#1
is there a such thing? my friend is writing a song and all it is is the chords D, B#, and B and he continues this through the whole song, I was like is that all it is 3 chords? and hes like its a little more complex than that, it has foundation notes. i never herd of that. Are there a such thing
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#2
Maybe he meant "root notes". There is no such note as a "B#" maybe he meant Bb or C.
#3
Does he mean bass notes that are different to the root of the chord, ie C/G or G/E etc etc etc?
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#4
Quote by Abacus11
Maybe he meant "root notes". There is no such note as a "B#" maybe he meant Bb or C.

tut tut tut depends on the key signature, C# major has a B# in it.
Quote by uvq
yeah fire him secretly... thats what im doing except im firing myself and secretly joining someone elses band

Quote by Jekkyl
If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

Quote by DiveRightIn63
thanks for the compliment man!
#5
^ +1 technically there is a B#, however in this case it doesn't sound like there would be.

as for foundation notes, never heard that term before and i've been studying music theory awhile now.
#6
Quote by Abacus11
Maybe he meant "root notes". There is no such note as a "B#" maybe he meant Bb or C.


I used to think of B# as one of those hypothetical notes you never encounter until i started playing Mozart songs on piano.
#7
You guys are right, theoretically there is a B# tone depending on your starting note (for example using a G# to start a major scale will contain a B# tone that can be played where the C is physically). I figured that in this case it was just a typo or misunderstanding. I'm pretty sure that by saying "foundation notes" he meant "root notes" which basically just means the first note in a chord that the chord is based on and named after.