#1
I guess i can improvise making solos, but i can't create solos to go along with songs. I am trying to be in a band but it is hard when it takes forever to create a solo going with the riff my friend is playing.
#3
Quote by Guitarism12
learn lots and lots of scales. tis the key to a good solo.

I know about scales and how to use them, but I still struggle. My friend can still create stuff without scales easily.
#5
Quote by CHOCOmoney
improvise, keep what you like

i can improvise, but often when i try to improvise it doesn't go along with it or if it does it doesn't sound good.
#6
Try taking a chord progression for a song and learn to improvise over it keeping with the feel and scale of the song. If you can do it with a song you know well it can help you to learn to write a solo for a new song.
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#7
Quote by gsomej
I guess i can improvise making solos, but i can't create solos to go along with songs. I am trying to be in a band but it is hard when it takes forever to create a solo going with the riff my friend is playing.


If you know scales, do you know how to play in key with what your friend is playing? If he's playing a riff in Bb minor and you bust out an A minor pentatonic scale, then it won't flow. If you know that ( I hope so xD) then learn some solos you like and learn what they do. Example: I love Avenged Sevenfold, and Synyster Gates (probably 'cause of his jazz training) throws in a lot of chromatic tones (especially b2's and b5's). So sometimes I like to dance around the perfect fifth note (in A minor, that would be E) by going up a semitone to F, back to E, down to D#, back to E, and then nail the A.

Just practice as well. It'll eventually come to you. You won't the next Slash overnight.
#8
I like to plan my solos to an extent. If I know I'll have to solo over a particular chord sequence in a song, I'll sit down for a while and write a really catchy opening for the solo, to kinda draw the listener in and keep them interested. From there, I'll throw in some improvisation, while trying not to be too bland, and then write a really powerful ending with some sort of build up that flows back into the chord sequence.

I always find this adds more flavour to my solos, rather than just improvising the whole thing and using the same licks over and over again.
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#9
Start from the melody hook of the song and steal from your heroes. Works every time.
#10
Quote by Austyn6661
If you know scales, do you know how to play in key with what your friend is playing? If he's playing a riff in Bb minor and you bust out an A minor pentatonic scale, then it won't flow. If you know that ( I hope so xD) then learn some solos you like and learn what they do. Example: I love Avenged Sevenfold, and Synyster Gates (probably 'cause of his jazz training) throws in a lot of chromatic tones (especially b2's and b5's). So sometimes I like to dance around the perfect fifth note (in A minor, that would be E) by going up a semitone to F, back to E, down to D#, back to E, and then nail the A.

Just practice as well. It'll eventually come to you. You won't the next Slash overnight.

I guess i need to learn more about scales and stuff, I don't really understand half of what you are saying, haha. When I learned guitar i just basically played and learned stuff by myself
#11
Simple my good sir, find out the key the riff is in or what chord(s) the riff fits into. Then solo in that key.

Also learn a **** ton of scales, helps alot.
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#12
Quote by angus is god
Simple my good sir, find out the key the riff is in or what chord(s) the riff fits into. Then solo in that key.

Also learn a **** ton of scales, helps alot.

what do you mean by find the key? I don't understand

edit: nevermind, i know what you mean by the key i was just getting confused with the terms. what if they are doing differnet chords though?
Last edited by gsomej at Dec 25, 2008,
#13
Quote by gsomej
what do you mean by find the key? I don't understand

edit: nevermind, i know what you mean by the key i was just getting confused with the terms. what if they are doing differnet chords though?


What do you mean by different chords?

Someone has a riff/chord progression in E Minor, you solo in E Minor (or E Minor Pentatonic).

I recommend reading The Crusade series (starting here ). It helped me learn theory.

Good luck, and if you have any other questions, shoot.
#14
what i mean is, what if the chords they are playing isn't related to any scale?
#15
Quote by gsomej
what i mean is, what if the chords they are playing isn't related to any scale?


If you wouldn't mind, could you post the chords up?
#16
heres what i do, that might help.

At band practices, when soloing, i tell the other band members that the solo will run on until i decide to finish it, just for the sake of practice ( i never "write" solos, persay)

So when it comes time for the solo, i usually can nail a good intro, its something ive worked on over the years. But after that, i will just play in 3 ways, each for about 3 or 4 times through the progression.

1) i play full out speed, with higher gain than in the verses, chorus etc.
2) i play slower, more bluesy, lower volume, more emotion.
3) i play in a jazz style, with lots of chromatism.

when this is done, i find a little patern. for instance in one of our songs, i started with full on blues solo. then i slowed it down to a little mix of 2 and 3, and then back into 1.

for another one, i have a section of 2, with a section of combined 1&3

After that, i pick an ending, and that becomes the cue for the rest of the band.
#17
Quote by gsomej
what i mean is, what if the chords they are playing isn't related to any scale?



The chords that are being played are always related to a key.

For example, if the progression goes G-D-C (a fairly common progression in the key of G Major), the notes that make up those three chords are all in the G Major scale. Then you can play a solo comprised of scales that sound good with the G Major scale.

Look over some basic, music theory. It will help you with your song writing and next time you have a question, you will be able to understand the anwers better
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Last edited by haggin13 at Dec 26, 2008,
#18
Quote by Austyn6661
If you wouldn't mind, could you post the chords up?

i never write tabs, but i will try...
4 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
and he repeats it 4 times i think
#20
You might wanna learn loads and loads of scales. It is THE key to of making a good solo.
#21
Quote by llanafreak44
Everything falls into a scale. What you posted is pretty simple, try playing the E minor scale.

thanks, can you try to tell me how they relate though?
#22
Quote by gsomej
thanks, can you try to tell me how they relate though?


Well the riff you have there is a bit ambiguous. The root is obviously E (rule of thumb is that the root is whatever note the riff is resolved on. Hitting E here makes it feel over, compared to an F).

E Major: E F# G# A B C# D#
E Minor: E F# G A B C D

Your riff has three different chords. The first one has F# on the low E, B on the A, and F# on the high E. This makes a B power chord (B & F#) Your next chord has F#, C#, and F#. "So isn't it in major then, because it has a C#?" NOPE! This is an F# power chord. When you make a power chord, don't think of it as a chord, think of it as a chunky version of a note (someone on UG said that once, I forget who ). The final chord is a repeated E power chord (E and B).

So altogether, you have F#, B, and E chords. So pick one of those two scales (or their pentatonics) and shred!
#23
To make things easier, just imagine the E minor scale


---------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------0--3--------------
--------------------------0-3---------------------
------------------0-2-4---------------------------
----------0-2-3-----------------------------------
-0-2-3--------------------------------------------

If what your friend plays corresponds with this, then this scale would fit.

The root note is E(0 on the sixth string). He also plays an F#(2 on the sixth string). Both of those fall on the E minor scale, he's just putting them into power chords. To make things short, you should just watch what he's playing, and try to see what scale it fits on, then just improvise on that scale.
#24
Quote by Guitarism12
learn lots and lots of scales. tis the key to a good solo.
For improvising, maybe.


When it comes to writing solos, all you need is a good pair of ears!

Basically, the more you listen, the more you learn.


Try listening to lots of different guitarists for inspiration. Here's a few with particularly unique/recognisable styles, you might pick up some new ideas from listening to them:

Brian May
Jeff Beck
Wes Montgomery
Randy Rhoads
Joe Bonamassa
Matt Bellamy
Eric Johnson
Guthrie Govan
BB King

Pay close attention to the way great guitarists build solos out of different phrases and licks, to give them a 'vocal' quality. It sounds a lot more interesting than someone playing scale patterns up and down as fast as they can...
#25
Quote by Austyn6661
Well the riff you have there is a bit ambiguous. The root is obviously E (rule of thumb is that the root is whatever note the riff is resolved on. Hitting E here makes it feel over, compared to an F).

E Major: E F# G# A B C# D#
E Minor: E F# G A B C D

Your riff has three different chords. The first one has F# on the low E, B on the A, and F# on the high E. This makes a B power chord (B & F#) Your next chord has F#, C#, and F#. "So isn't it in major then, because it has a C#?" NOPE! This is an F# power chord. When you make a power chord, don't think of it as a chord, think of it as a chunky version of a note (someone on UG said that once, I forget who ). The final chord is a repeated E power chord (E and B).

So altogether, you have F#, B, and E chords. So pick one of those two scales (or their pentatonics) and shred!



thank you so much, this helped a lot

you don't even know how much this means to me xD