#1
i was look at ug lessons and saw
one for harmonic and one for melodic

what the diffrent betwen this two

ok i have met som problem in sticky
........
C is the root note (the note you start building the scale off of)
One whole step (two frets) from C is D
One whole from D is E
One half step (one fret) from E is F
One whole step from F is G
One whole step from G is A
One whole step from A is B
And one half step from B is C (our starting note).

what its
one whole=?
g=
a=
c=
etc
pls explain me i will be very happy if som 1 explain me
Last edited by BloodRain at Dec 24, 2008,
#4
Those are scale degrees. If you don't understand those, read the sticky, they represent the notes of the scale.

I'll give you an example in the key of A minor and you can compare them.

A Minor Natural scale: A B C D E F G A
A Minor Harmonic scale: A B C D E F G# A
A Minor Melodic scale: A B C D E F# G# A (Use natural minor scale if you're descending or "going down")
#5
The major scale is a set pattern. There are seven distinct "pitch classes" in the major scale. Each degree of the scale is represented by a number. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. This is done so that one can discuss scale relationships without reference to a specific key.

Every other scale is written in relation to the major scale. So the Major Scale is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. The Natural Minor scale has a minor 3rd, minor 6th and minor 7th interval compared to the major scale so is written 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. b3 means "flat 3". In this context it means that in relation to the major scale this note is lowered one semitone.

The Natural Minor scale poses problems for the composer when writing harmonically as the triad built on the 5th degree of the scale is a minor chord. This provides a less powerful resolve than a major triad. The reason for the minor triad built on the fifth degree is the b7 of the natural minor scale (which is a minor 3rd above the 5th degree of the scale).

To bring back the powerful resolve of a major triad on the 5th degree moving back to the tonic composers often restore the 7th back to it's major quality. The result is the natural minor scale with a major seventh. This is spelled as such 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 (notice the 7 is no longer b7.)

When playing melodically the natural 7th or major 7th is also a very important when ascending toward the root note as it leads so strongly up one semitone to the tonic. This is why the major 7th degree is called "the leading tone" - because it leads in so well to the tonic.

The Harmonic Minor scale is not a great solution here because of it's disjointed interval structure. If you were moving from the 5th for example you would move up one semitone to the b6th then up three semitones to the 7th and up one more semitone to the 8th or root note. This is not a smooth sounding run. In order to compensate the b6 is also restored to the major sixth and so the run upwards from the 5th then becomes a move up two semitones to the 6 up two more semitones to the 7th then up one semitone to the 8th or root. This is a much smoother and more pleasing movement up toward the root.

When descending melodically (moving away) from the root the leading tone is not as important since we don't have the need for it's strong pull toward the root - we are after all moving away from the root. Traditionally the Melodic Minor scale is only used when ascending. However, over time it has come to be used in both ascending and descending instances.

Hence the Melodic Minor is the Natural Minor with a restored major 7th (as is the Harmonic Minor) but also a restored major 6th degree (not found in the Harmonic Minor).

So:
Major Scale = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Natural Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Harmonic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7
Melodic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
Si
#6
wow dude your english is so hard to undearstand for me
but i think i undearstand somthing exsept
how undear stand when you write 1 2 3 4b 5 6#< how i undearstand this
b=minor
#=major
but what is the numbers mean
#7
Quote by BloodRain
wow dude your english is so hard to undearstand for me
but i think i undearstand somthing exsept
how undear stand when you write 1 2 3 4b 5 6#< how i undearstand this
b=minor
#=major
but what is the numbers mean


b does not equal minor, and # does not equal major. They mean flat and sharp respectively (b is flat, and # is sharp).

At the risk of sounding patronising, if you don't understand the concept of flats and sharps (what they mean); you should probably rewind your studies and forget about harmonic and melodic minor until you can grasp the fundamental basics, which includes half steps and whole steps, which you don't seem to understand either.
#8
Quote by BloodRain
wow dude your english is so hard to undearstand for me
but i think i undearstand somthing exsept
how undear stand when you write 1 2 3 4b 5 6#< how i undearstand this
b=minor
#=major
but what is the numbers mean


Before trying to understand scales you need to understand other basic things, like alterations, accidentals, notes, degree, maybe intervals too, and then understanding scales, harmonic or melodic minor will be a piece of cake.

Although the lesson could be about melody and harmony instead, but whatever...
#9
Quote by gonzaw
Before trying to understand scales you need to understand other basic things, like alterations, accidentals, notes, degree, maybe intervals too, and then understanding scales, harmonic or melodic minor will be a piece of cake.

like you see i am not know english so good
and i live in new country so i cant go to teacher i wont undearstand him
so i would like if som 1 will can give me a link to lesson from the lesson list in the site
and say me what to learn step after step............

Although the lesson could be about melody and harmony instead, but
whatever...

the same i said to the first.......

i really dont know what to learn for progres ...........
#10
Quote by BloodRain
the same i said to the first.......

i really dont know what to learn for progres ...........


If you are not that familiar with English, go to a website with a language of your choice (google it) that teaches theory maybe..

I could give you a kind of lesson, but I am going out in 15 minutes and I'll be gone for like a week....
#11
Quote by BloodRain
wow dude your english is so hard to undearstand for me
but i think i undearstand somthing exsept
how undear stand when you write 1 2 3 4b 5 6#< how i undearstand this
b=minor
#=major
but what is the numbers mean

The numbers are "stand-ins" for the different notes in the major scale. Using numbers instead of notes means we can talk about the make up of a scale as it applies to any key.

So
Major Scale = 1  2  3  4  5  6  7
Key of C      C  D  E  F  G  A  B  
Key of A      A  B  C# D  E  F#  G#


Natural Minor Scale = 1  2 b3  4  5 b6 b7
Key of Cm             C  D  Eb F  G  Ab Bb
Key of Am             A  B  C  D  E  F  G


b = lower the note by one semitone
# = means raise the note by one semitone

So you can see how the C major scale is made up and when you compare it with the natural minor the third sixth and seventh are all lowered by one semitone.
The same can be said of the A major scale compared with the A minor scale.

I hope this is clearer for you.
Si