#1
Hi.

A quick search found me no answer to my question, so, I was just wondering if anyone could recommend me a medieval scale, much like the keyboard (?) solo in "Children of Bodom" by CoB, approximately 3:50 into the song (youtube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Y56OTputSs).

Thanks.
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Last edited by Vitamin_A at Dec 24, 2008,
#2
I haven't seen the video, but maybe Harmonic Minor? I know COB have used it before, so it might be similair to whatever the guy does in the video.
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#3
Well, medieval stuff is going to be based on modal scales for the most part. Things like dorian or aeolian. Oh, and avoid diminished fifths as they are usually never used.
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#6
Quote by Paquijón
The link you posted doesn't work, and I unfortunately can't find the song on Youtube...


sorry, fixed it now.

and thanks everyone, i'll try those out
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"An Iron Curtain has descended over our classroom..."

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#8
In medieval music there were 4 modes used. Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, and mixolydian. Thats the simple answer. A simple search on wikipedia of gregorian modes will yield more informative answer than i care to give, but just to let you know, you're barking up a very difficult to understand tree. If you're trying to do something like a medieval sounding dance piece just stick with simple 5th harmony and the dorian mode.
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#9
Medieval music (like what has already been said) is completely modal. Nothing key based at all.

After a composer has written a (modal) melody, he would write an accompaniment with counterpoint. Most medieval peices are very contrapunctual. Most medieval composers probably learn their art from monks or from other musicians (from the time). Seeing as all of these monks and musician are dead, this information would be hard to come by. Your best bet is to study "Gradus Ad Parnassum" and study some medieval peices (John Dowland writes some great stuff)

Minor scales are not used though. Minor scales is a later invention when tonal music was invented. This happened at around the 1600's?

Also, that peice in Children Of Bodom (the song) doesn't sound medieval, it sounds very baroque based (imho). Baroque is just a name for early common era music (what you philistines call "classical music"). The way most composers learn to write classical music (a very long and drawn out process) is by studying counterpoint. The counterpoint text book most 17th and 18th century composers would have studied would have been Fux's "Gradus Ad Parnassum."
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#10
^You might be right about the baroque thing. It sounded like it was played on a harpsichord which is an instrument used alot in the baroque period but rapidly became unpopular after it. It has lots of continuos quavers or semi-quavers which is another feature.

Also, I haven't heard much Medieval Music but the stuff I've head have been very slow chants which don't sound much like that.

To me it sounded like harmonic minor but I haven't worked the notes out yet so I don't know for sure.
#11
After a composer has written a (modal) melody, he would write an accompaniment with counterpoint. Most medieval peices are very contrapunctual. Most medieval composers probably learn their art from monks or from other musicians (from the time). Seeing as all of these monks and musician are dead, this information would be hard to come by. Your best bet is to study "Gradus Ad Parnassum" and study some medieval peices (John Dowland writes some great stuff)



You're thinking of the Renaissance period, starting around 1450/1500.(I think that's the date, I know the middle ages go up to about 1500, but the Renaissance first starts to appear a bit before that)

Dowland is a Renaissance composer. Medieval is monophonic, ala Gregorian chant, based on the Ecclesiastes modes as opposed to the Greek modes.


EDIT: Reading on wiki. There was poliphony in the Medieval period, but solely based on fourths and fifths until the higher middle ages, in the period of Ars Nova when they started using more complicated poliphony.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Music
Last edited by Confusius at Dec 25, 2008,
#12
Quote by Confusius
You're thinking of the Renaissance period, starting around 1450/1500.(I think that's the date, I know the middle ages go up to about 1500, but the Renaissance first starts to appear a bit before that)

Dowland is a Renaissance composer. Medieval is monophonic, ala Gregorian chant, based on the Ecclesiastes modes as opposed to the Greek modes.


EDIT: Reading on wiki. There was poliphony in the Medieval period, but solely based on fourths and fifths until the higher middle ages, in the period of Ars Nova when they started using more complicated poliphony.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Music
Arghhh you're probably right . When was counterpoint invented, 1400's sometime?
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