#1
When I'm improvising with a certain mode, let's say G Ionian.. Is it okay for me to switch from G Ionian to say, G Aeolian? Help me out.
#2
If youre in the key of G playing the G Ionian Scale, youre playing the G major Scale, However if you move to the G Aeolian that is the g minor scale which changes the key that you are using. If you want to you can go from playing the G Ionian to the E Aeolian, because E is the relative minor of G major
#3
There is absolutely nothing wrong with that if indeed that's the desired effect. G Ionian to G Aeolian would be a dramatic shift in mood and harmonic contour that can lead to some interesting music. There's nothing wrong in music, what matters is what feels good to your ears. A smoother transition of key, or mode would be achieved by changing to a mode that have a more smiler mood and implied harmonies; in most cases this simply means, more notes in common. This sort of shift of modes is something you could associate with Joe Satriani's Pitch Axis theory; more or less.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA
#5
If you are playing in G major, you can't play E minor, or Aeolean. This is simply because you will be playing the G major scale and stressing very awkward notes.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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#6
If you're playing in the key of G then you play G [mode]. Yes, you can switch between modes. Learning how to do that to produce the tonal effect you want is where the real skill comes in.
Practice. Play. Sleep. Repeat.

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i take it next your going to tell me that Cb is a note too!
#7
Quote by The_Sophist
If you are playing in G major, you can't play E minor, or Aeolean. This is simply because you will be playing the G major scale and stressing very awkward notes.
This

Remember if you're playing the changes (which I think T/S is doing) you must stress chord tones (best done by playing a chord tone on the first beat of the bar), and the mode you're using must have the same tonal center as the root of the chord (this is just a simplicity thing).

For example:

If your progression looks like this: Gmaj7, Am, Ab7

You can play these modes over these chords:

Gmaj7 - G ionian, G lydian

Am - A aeolian, A dorian, A phrygian

Ab7 - Ab mixolydian

There are also melodic minor modes and harmonic minor modes, but save them for later.

What you can't do is play relative modes and expect them to sound different. They won't. They'll just sound awkward. The context (the chord playing in most cases) defines the mode.
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#8
Quote by kevinbeingkevin
When I'm improvising with a certain mode, let's say G Ionian.. Is it okay for me to switch from G Ionian to say, G Aeolian? Help me out.


it's okay for you to do anything you want or that sounds good to you. The notes/scale you choose will sound as they relate to the chords that are supporting them. If your chord progression is in the key or G Major (Ionian if you absolutely must use the modal names......which btw you dont....its just Major), and you play G minor (aeolian) over it.... you will likely hear it as sounding "wrong" or misplaced.

If you really want to understand this stuff it will help to get a better grasp on melody to chord relationships in the standard Major and minor scales and then come back to modes.


Quote by one vision
The only difference is that if you're playing E aeolian, you should note that it's not exactly the same as playing "minor" because there is a lack of a major dominant chord.


well, aeolian = natural minor scale. There is no difference between the actual scales. It's just that in a particular period of music history it became common practice to use the major V chord instead of the minor v chord because the stronger resolution that the leading tone offers was preferred.
Either way, when your talking Ionian and aeolian there is in most cases no need to refer to them by their modal names. Its just Major and minor.

Quote by The_Sophist
If you are playing in G major, you can't play E minor, or Aeolean. This is simply because you will be playing the G major scale and stressing very awkward notes.


You could play "E minor/aeolian", its just that it will sound like G major. The notes you stress (assuming you know the Em arpeggio) will mostly be part of the G triad. The only one that isnt is the E which is a 6th to G...... a perfectly acceptable sound over a major chord. The thing is, if you play E minor over G, and not thinking of it in relation to G..... you probably aren't knowledgeable enough yet to realize that.

So I agree that you "shouldn't" be playing E minor over G and thinking of it as E minor....... ..... but I disagree that you "can't " play E minor over G...... you certainly can.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 25, 2008,