#1
My bandmates and I practice in our rhythm guitarists garage. We have mats down to stand on and all of our amps are on tables and racks.

I'm playing a Gibson Les Paul through a 65W Kustom Amp, and whenever I put my fingers on the strings I can feel the slight constant tingle of electricity. It's not enough to zap me or to be uncomfortable, it's just odd.

No one else can feel it and was certain that I was faking it until finally our bassist was able to feel it. So we started a bit of a process of elimination to determine the problem.

We ran my guitar to a different amp, and I was still able to feel the tingling. Thus eliminating a faulty amp from the equation. Then we changed chords, I could still feel the tingling. So by this point it seemed to definitely be the guitar.

Well then we just changed the guitar, I switched to a Danelectro, and I still feel the tingling.

I'm worried that maybe I've done something to damage my fingers as its only me (for the majority of the time) feeling this. Anyone have any tips or suggestions?
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#4
Quote by HIM%(^
thats called improper grounding..and yes..thats dangerous


I understand improper grounding, but why would no one else feel it?
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#5
Quote by TheGallowsPole
I understand improper grounding, but why would no one else feel it?

Because it's your guitar that's not grounded right. Make the other players hold it and ask them if they feel it, they will if it's a grounding issue.
It is kind of weird that both guitars have grounding issues...
#6
We changed guitars, I can feel it in a completely separate guitar; and only one other person has felt it once on mine.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#7
Every person has a different natural resistance. Perhaps yours is just lower than your bandmates?
#8
Today I'm going to switch surge protectors and see if that fixes the problem, if I still feel the tingling, should I assume that my natural resistance is just lower?
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#9
Or you're friends were pulling your leg.
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#11
Twice actually.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#12
Quote by Bottle of Dirt
Because it's your guitar that's not grounded right. Make the other players hold it and ask them if they feel it, they will if it's a grounding issue.
It is kind of weird that both guitars have grounding issues...



No Because the outlet the amps are plugged into are not grounded properly, which is REALLY dangerous... a new surge protector can't fix this...

And the reason not everyone can feel it, is because certain electronics will be affected adversely by improper grounding, and some others will still be within operable ranges.
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#14
I wouldn't worry about your fingers, people just have different sensitivities to these kinds of things.. Whats strange though is that it's happening when you're standing on mats and concrete, both of which are good insulators. Are you using any mics or touching anything else that could complete the circuit (if not don't try to, cause you could get a real shock)? I had a friend using a bad amp that didn't cause any problems until he started singing.
Anything with two prongs is garbage, but even three prong outlets can be wired incorrectly (which happens more often than it should) so you should buy a tester.
#15
I don't know if it's similar in any way but I have static on my strings pretty much any time I'm not touching them. It's like a humm that you can hear constantly unless I touch the strings. Using an acoustic amp for my electric as I just got it and haven't bought an electric amp yet. This is also to do with improper grounding. Changed outlet to a grounded one and the buzz was gone.

Alternatively (since the grounded one is not in my room) we tried hanging a stripped wire with a piece of metal on it from the back of the guitar. The lid on the back is missing so we tied it to the springs. I first tried standing on the piece of metal when it was hanging on the ground, but I had to step real hard on it to feel any difference. Then I tried putting the piece of metal in the back of my boxer (err, yeah). Well that seemed to close the circuit and the buzz was all gone.

Not too much of an electrician to tell wether I'm zapping my organs using that method or not though