#1
I have two questions. Me and my friend have been recording music together for a few months, and we're about ready to record a full length album. We'd like to do everything ourself, because we've already made products on a tascam digital 8 track recorder that are hi-fi enough for our liking, and we don't want to spend money to get professionally recorded. Frankly we like the lo-fi DIY sound we get, but my questions are

1) For recording our final products, we'd like more than 8 tracks. As I've said the only thing we've been using is a tascam digital 8 track, with external effects and whatnot used. Now would we be able to record onto a computer (we both have macbooks) using some sort of software, and not have it take away from the quality? The reason I ask is that I've recorded my guitar amp, output through my mac, and it's sounded too twangy and strange, not "pure" and real like on an external 8 track.

2) If we decided to just use the 8 track and bounce tracks to allow for more than 8, what would be a good program to mix down our final recordings, and add effects and whatnot?
#2
Oh and if you'd recommend using a computer, are there just 1/4" to USB cable adaptors or something that we'd have to use?
#4
the reason directly lined guitars often sound weak and strange is that the speaker(s) do their amount work processing on the sound too (bigger speaker, fatter sound)

don't know how that is to work with or how it's out/inputs goes, but I'd recommend (unless you can do it with the recorder) buying a soundcard and record everything on the computer. much easier to mix and do afterworks such as putting effects and such...

Buy some good mics and record one thing at the time, guitars, lyrics, drums, bass, w/e and then mix it on the computer.
Good allround mics would be SM57's. two of those and you'll do quite well


EDIT: and stop double posting and bumping, you won't last long here if you continue to do that
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#5
1. Depends, sometimes software has to bring the quality of the track down to meet the recording buffer size . . . I think, not entirely sure but I can recommend looking around at differnet softwares before buying

2. What kind of program are you looking for, what kind of effects? And what is whatnot?
#6
Quote by linus.d
the reason directly lined guitars often sound weak and strange is that the speaker(s) do their amount work processing on the sound too (bigger speaker, fatter sound)

don't know how that is to work with or how it's out/inputs goes, but I'd recommend (unless you can do it with the recorder) buying a soundcard and record everything on the computer. much easier to mix and do afterworks such as putting effects and such...

Buy some good mics and record one thing at the time, guitars, lyrics, drums, bass, w/e and then mix it on the computer.
Good allround mics would be SM57's. two of those and you'll do quite well


EDIT: and stop double posting and bumping, you won't last long here if you continue to do that


Could you reword what you said about directly lined guitars losing quality? I don't really understand what you said. And what would you recommend I do to avoid this?

And as for recording on the computer, you didn't answer my original question about what software to use and whatnot?
#7
Quote by Comrade Curry
1. Depends, sometimes software has to bring the quality of the track down to meet the recording buffer size . . . I think, not entirely sure but I can recommend looking around at differnet softwares before buying

2. What kind of program are you looking for, what kind of effects? And what is whatnot?



OK, let's say we recorded a song on my tascam 8 track digital recorder, and then wanted a delay effect on the vocals at 1:17, just a hypothetical random example. What program could we use to do this after mixing the recordings down on the computer? Other effects and "whatnot" would be like reverb, phaser, flange, etc, just the basic effects used on recordings...
#8
I'd record everything on the computer. I use Sonar as my workstation software and use a the POD 2.0 to record my guitar directly into the computer. If you don't want to go directly in you can get some good mics, SM57s as stated above are perfect, and record like that.

Since you are using macbooks, Garageband should be okay for recording as well but the same hardware can be used. If you decide to record directly, there are also good units by M-Audio and PreSonus.

OK, let's say we recorded a song on my tascam 8 track digital recorder, and then wanted a delay effect on the vocals at 1:17, just a hypothetical random example. What program could we use to do this after mixing the recordings down on the computer? Other effects and "whatnot" would be like reverb, phaser, flange, etc, just the basic effects used on recordings...


Sonar has built-in VST effects, as does other software such as Reason and Cubase. I know Garageband has effect tools that can be applied as well, though I don't know what they use exactly. You can select a certain area on the audio file and apply the effect or you can make a seperate track for the clip and apply the effects to that track only.

You can also get an audio editing software, such as Audacity in which you can highlight a certain area of the audio file and apply transformations to it.
Last edited by TheNoManBand at Dec 25, 2008,
#10
Yea like TheNoManBand said most recording software has VST effects where you can just select the portion of track apply the effect and modify the effect almost as if it were a pedal, Sonar for example is a very good program with VST, if you're looking for something free well THE best software is Reaper, has excellent VST plug-ins and is simple to use for the most part, plus it's free.
#11
Quote by TheNoManBand
I'd record everything on the computer. I use Sonar as my workstation software and use a the POD 2.0 to record my guitar directly into the computer. If you don't want to go directly in you can get some good mics, SM57s as stated above are perfect, and record like that.

Since you are using macbooks, Garageband should be okay for recording as well but the same hardware can be used. If you decide to record directly, there are also good units by M-Audio and PreSonus.



So to avoid the guitar problem I'd have to get some sort of preamp or mic it?

And Sonar would be what we actually recorded in, correct? Can you also mix down and edit your recordings with effects in Sonar?
#12
Thanks for the software recommendations guys. Are there any programs other than SONAR that will be well suited for recording, or would SONAR be the best route to go? I'm just looking for options to look into.
#13
If you prefer using the eight track, you could fill the tracks, record them to a high quality wav on your mac, record the rest of the tracks, and do the same. Then you can mix the whole lot down on your mac.

As for software, I'd definitely say Sony Acid. It's one of the easiest to get to grips with, and I'm guessing you don't want to spend a long time getting to know new software.
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#14
Quote by rabidguitarist
If you prefer using the eight track, you could fill the tracks, record them to a high quality wav on your mac, record the rest of the tracks, and do the same. Then you can mix the whole lot down on your mac.

As for software, I'd definitely say Sony Acid. It's one of the easiest to get to grips with, and I'm guessing you don't want to spend a long time getting to know new software.



Ahh that's a good idea. Thanks man, I'll check out sony acid
#15
i use logic pro but it's pretty expensive, i'd suggest getting an external usb interface that you can plug mics into and recording straight to whatever software you decide to use, i think you can do this in garageband but i havent really used it for a long time.
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#16
Quote by metal_al
i use logic pro but it's pretty expensive, i'd suggest getting an external usb interface that you can plug mics into and recording straight to whatever software you decide to use, i think you can do this in garageband but i havent really used it for a long time.


alright cool. I probably would try out SONAR and whatnot, because I dislike garageband
#17
Quote by fattyDQ
alright cool. I probably would try out SONAR and whatnot, because I dislike garageband


You really don't even need sonar for a little home studio project, home studio is just a watered down version of sonnar, but is still suited to fit your needs in my opinion.
#18
Quote by Comrade Curry
You really don't even need sonar for a little home studio project, home studio is just a watered down version of sonnar, but is still suited to fit your needs in my opinion.


???
#19
Quote by fattyDQ
Could you reword what you said about directly lined guitars losing quality? I don't really understand what you said. And what would you recommend I do to avoid this?

And as for recording on the computer, you didn't answer my original question about what software to use and whatnot?



Didn't mean quality necessarily is lost, but it often looses the little extra spice that speakers may give. granted, you can fix it relatively good with an EQ and/or ampsimulator, but why make things harder? (unless you want the sound of the ampsimulator )

As for programs, I'm using Cubase SX3 and find it perfect for me, quite easy to get along with if you have somewhat experience of mixing, rarely lags (never a single lag for me so far... and my computer is nearly 4 years old) , lots of functions and extras + decent VST plug-ins are included.

For drums I use EZdrummer, and if I need som other sound I either take it from HALion or go scouting for a VST instrument that'll give the sound I want
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#20
I use a microphone and Audacity to record.
The quality is awesome and it's easy.
#21
To record and mix my stuff, i use Ableton Live. Theres tons of DAW's out there though.

Cubase, Ableton, Sonar, Pro Tools, Logic, etc. and you can find more if you google.
Most of the company websites offer free demos, which dont let you save, but some offer full trials, which let you save for a few days.
#22
Quote by Tazeyo
I use a microphone and Audacity to record.
The quality is awesome and it's easy.

Seriously? I use a mic and audacity with my laptop and my quality sounds ****.


Not to mention I suck at the editing part..so when I try to match up the tracks Its like hell.
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#23
Quote by rabidguitarist
If you prefer using the eight track, you could fill the tracks, record them to a high quality wav on your mac, record the rest of the tracks, and do the same. Then you can mix the whole lot down on your mac.

As for software, I'd definitely say Sony Acid. It's one of the easiest to get to grips with, and I'm guessing you don't want to spend a long time getting to know new software.


Yeah, this is great.

I strongly recommend you get a Tascam / Fostex 8 Track recorder. Look out for the Tascam 2488 and 2488 MkII (I use this bad boy)

The thing is, people make a big fuss about running through a sound card straight to the PC, but you're going to need a PC with at least 2 GB of ram and a **** load of free space on the hard drive.

Its easier to run directly into a multi track recorder, THEN mix on the PC afterwards.

You wont believe how many times the stop and rewind buttons get pressed, you'll soon get pissed off with hitting the space bar on your PC.

The best things yo can spend money on are.. a decent condenser mic, good speakers and an 8 track recorder with either a USB or CD drive

Check out my recordings! done with a Tascam DPO1 and 2488, and the audio workstation "Reaper"
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#24
Quote by nick dixon
Yeah, this is great.

I strongly recommend you get a Tascam / Fostex 8 Track recorder. Look out for the Tascam 2488 and 2488 MkII (I use this bad boy)

The thing is, people make a big fuss about running through a sound card straight to the PC, but you're going to need a PC with at least 2 GB of ram and a **** load of free space on the hard drive.

Its easier to run directly into a multi track recorder, THEN mix on the PC afterwards.

You wont believe how many times the stop and rewind buttons get pressed, you'll soon get pissed off with hitting the space bar on your PC.

The best things yo can spend money on are.. a decent condenser mic, good speakers and an 8 track recorder with either a USB or CD drive

Check out my recordings! done with a Tascam DPO1 and 2488, and the audio workstation "Reaper"



Your music sounds like an old black folk singer before he got old, and he's in a phase of his life where he takes a lot of lsd. It's neat.
#25
For software, I don'tknow how much money you are willing to spend, but I use ProTools 7.4 LE software with a bunch of add-ons and plug-ins and such that give me quite a nice sound in basically every area. It's a bit expensive, and a tad complicated to use, but it's worth it.

For slightly lower-cost software, I have used Adobe Audition and Audacity, both of which are pretty good audio-editing softwares.
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#26
get a telephone

telephone local colleges (music engineering dept)

offer your services as a guinea pig

win
#27
Quote by zippidyduda
For software, I don'tknow how much money you are willing to spend, but I use ProTools 7.4 LE software with a bunch of add-ons and plug-ins and such that give me quite a nice sound in basically every area. It's a bit expensive, and a tad complicated to use, but it's worth it.

For slightly lower-cost software, I have used Adobe Audition and Audacity, both of which are pretty good audio-editing softwares.


But is it easy to learn protools? I have it, but it seems pretty complex to do anything other than record basic tracks...
#28
^ just experiment with it. There isnt a lot wrong you can do!
Squier Classic Vibe Custom
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