#1
Okay, so i got a cheap starter drum kit today (thanks santa), and i was thinking to myself, the cymbals could sound better.
Is there anything i could do to them to make this happen, or could anyone suggest to me some new cymbals on a budget, or even a manufacturer.
Also, maybe suggest some good budget drum head manufacturers?
Cheers.
#3
I know nothing about drums, but from what I've heard around the interwebz, cymbals (good ones anyways) are hella expensive. Stick with those, see if you like the drums, get good, then make an investment. However, Sabian and Zildjian both make excellent cymbals.
#4
Do you really need new cymbals on a starter set , just play it alot , learn to play it then buy a decent drum kit.Starter packs always suck.
#5
Quote by Kroaton
Do you really need new cymbals on a starter set , just play it alot , learn to play it then buy a decent drum kit.Starter packs always suck.


It's probably better that he upgrades his kit piece by piece rather than get a whole new kit.

I've heard good things about Sabian B8s, as far as price-to-quality, but I've never played them.

Paiste is also a real cheap brand. The only drummer that I know of that uses Paiste is John Dolmayan from SOAD.
#6
i can play drums, i only got the starter kit so that i had my own to play on rather than use other peoples.
i just dont know much about them.
#7
Cymbals are definitely one thing you should never skimp out on. Particularly the hi-hat and the ride.... if those two sound ****ty, then people are going to notice. If you can, you could try and find some decent cymbals second hand. I managed to score a small set of Zildjian A-Customs (20" Medium ride, 15" fast crash, 12" splash, 14" mastersound hi-hats) for 200 USD. You would actually do well to hit up the pawn shops. If that doesn't turn out any good results, i would probably recommend Sabian's XS 20 cymbals.... as they are the cheapest cymbals that are actually made from decent sounding bronze.

Now, as for drumheads...... i use Remo clear Pinstripes on my tom-toms. If your toms have a thick shell, i would strongly recommend using some type of dual ply head. On the snare, i use an Aquarian coated Focus-X drum head. It's a decent head configuration for playing rock music. However, you don't necessarily need to replace your heads right away. You could always apply varying degrees of muffling to them until you get a decent sound that is tolerable to your ear. For that you can just secure something like a bit of a sponge or a napkin to the drum head (out toward the rim of course) with a bit of duct tape (you could get some moon gel or muffle rings, but most households have duct tape and sponges on hand.... so just decide $5 or free).

Enjoy the kit, and good luck on the cymbal hunt.
#8
Look into getting Sabian Pro cymbals, I think you can get them all in a package reasonably priced, their not as heavy duty as some cymbals I've seen but they sound awesome and they aren't so pricy if you look hard enough. Perhaps check ebay or something.
#9
i second the paistes, my old drummer used to use them. they're pretty cheap and sound REALLY good for what you pay for them.
#11
You'll find that when you get a starter drum-kit, you'll probably want to upgrade your parts.
My starter drum-kit's cymbals were crap, so I bought some new ones and stuck 'em on instead.

Have a look at the cymbal brands:
Sabian,
Zildjian,
Istanbul,
Bosphorus,
Meinl,
Alchemy,
Orion,
Xilxo,
Factory Metal,
and Wuhan.
My Last.fm
USA Fender Stratocaster | Roland Cube 60 | VOX ToneLab LE
#12
I was going to make a thread, but I won't because I found this.
My brother has been playing drums for a couple years now, and is ridiculously good at them, and has $200 US to spend on cymbals. he already has a pair of decent double kicks, an has an 18" crash/ride and hi-hats and that's it. Basically a starter kit, but he wants to get more. Specific recommendations? He really wants a splash, and I think a smaller (16" or so?) crash would be really good to get.
He's big into metal and the -core genres, and plays in a metal band.
Quote by Jackal58
If I was Santa you'd all get shit for Christmas.
#15
When did Paiste start making cheap cymbals? I haven't looked at 'em since i first started playing and back then, they were the most expensive out of the big 3.
#16
Second rate is right on so many levels. For one, buying second hand is good, because cymbals mellow out over time, and so you know that the cymbal you bought isn't going to change in sound if it's used.

Also, hi-hats and rides are damn important to a kit. Get good ones, lest ye face the wrath of the drum gods.

EDITTOABOVE: I saw several paiste rides for 50-100 US dollars.
#17
okay, i thank you all. paiste cymbals seem cheap, and if they sound good, thats even better.
i didnt know that the sound changes the older they get, i might hold out for a bit to see if the ones i have currently get any better, i dont think that they will but we'll see.
also, my bass drum (kick drum) seems to sound high, i was wondering if there is any tips or tricks you could give me to make it sound more... Bassy, if thats a word?
#18
Quote by Grevious555
okay, i thank you all. paiste cymbals seem cheap, and if they sound good, thats even better.
i didnt know that the sound changes the older they get, i might hold out for a bit to see if the ones i have currently get any better, i dont think that they will but we'll see.
also, my bass drum (kick drum) seems to sound high, i was wondering if there is any tips or tricks you could give me to make it sound more... Bassy, if thats a word?


Try tuning it lower first, and if the low end still seems a bit trapped in the drum..... cut a hole 6 to 8 inches in diameter in the front head.
#19
Quote by Grevious555
okay, i thank you all. paiste cymbals seem cheap, and if they sound good, thats even better.
i didnt know that the sound changes the older they get, i might hold out for a bit to see if the ones i have currently get any better, i dont think that they will but we'll see.
also, my bass drum (kick drum) seems to sound high, i was wondering if there is any tips or tricks you could give me to make it sound more... Bassy, if thats a word?



Okay so a generally good method for tuning your toms is to tighten all the lugs about as tight as you can get them with your fingers; I do this by the rod, instead of the top of the lug, as one can REALLY tighten the hell out of a drum by the top of the lugs, whereas by the rod you'll usually achieve LPP, or Lowest Possible Pitch. Go around the drum SEVERAL times using your fingers, because as you tighten one lug, the head shifts and stuff. So go around until none of the lugs will budge.

(trust me, they'll probably get raw and dirty and hurt like a bizzatch, but it's something that just like guitarists and fretting, will go away in time. Well the pain will, unfortunately your hands will probably need a scrub afterwards )

This works for the bass drum too, but the method for that is a bit more complicated; I'll get into it later

The toms generally want to be tuned sympathetically, or so that both heads vibrate at the same speed, thusly producing the same pitch when the batter head is struck. Achieving this is REALLY easy with a decent amount of muscle memory. After all the lugs are tune to FT, or Finger Tension, you're gonna wanna tighten all the lugs at even intervals (quarter turns, half turns, etc), moving in a star-complimentary fashion. By half turn, I mean going from 3 o clock to 9 o clock, and by quarter i mean 3 o clock to 6 o clock. Generally once you've gone around doing 1 or 2 half turns, you're ready to move down to 8th and 16th turns. Basically with toms, if you can tune the batter, you can tune the resonant side too. Most drums have a 'sweet spot' they'll tune to; a 12 inch is generally a mid-high punchy tom, whereas a 18 inch is generally (if you're on cheap drums, flappy and weird, and if you're on nice drums, booming and bassy).

Anyway, onto the kick.

With the kick, you can start the same way you do with the toms; tune all the lugs using your fingers about as tight as you can.

Here's where the method differs from tuning the toms; after you have the lugs tuned the same, put a 5lb or something-like-that weight in the center of the head. This will be a reasonable, and close-to-how-much-pressure-you'll-exert amount of tension on the head. If you don't have a weight, simply bend over the drum, and push down into the center of the head, while keeping a hand free to tune. The base of a mic stand works too.

Then proceed to give each lug a quarter to half turn, increasing, and checking every now and then. Generally a half turn or a whole turn will suffice. You're gonna wanna tune your reso either sympathetically or higher by a semitone or two.

With snares, it's really a feel-it-out method, although I can say the reso does good a 3rd away from the batter (major or minor, it isnt like guitars so it's really just however high you want it)...although you can use a tuner; grab one and use it's A-producing function as a starting point. For instance, you tune your reso to an A (whatever octave you desire), and your batter to C#

Snare wires you generally don't want to have choked, nor flappy. Find a sweet spot where they rattle around a bit, but don't take away the pop, nor let them violently (and terribly-sounding) vibrate. To check the pitch of the drum itself, grab a guitar (or have your guitarist or whatever) go through some scales on his guitar until you find a note that REALLY "wakes your snares up" so to speak. This will show you what note your snare is closely tuned to. This is because the resonance of the two heads, plus the dampening of the snare wires, conveniently (and sometimes quite accurately) reproduces a single note.

Basicaly though, a few key points.

1. Toms ALWAYS sympathetically, or if you really want the vintage tone/sound, tune the reso SLIGHTLY, EVER SO SLIGHTLY, higher than the batter.

2. Ensure all lugs on any drum at any given time/place, are at equal tension/pitch. Check the pitches by tapping right in front of the lug.

3. Have fun drumming and don't, like me, let the tuning make you hate playing.


OHHHHHHHHHHH


and..

Budget drum heads (?)

ATTACK makes really good drumheads that aren't as much as the other company's. Although I can tell you their resins and bonding agents and production techniques aren't of the higher quality as the other company's are. Evans and Remo, make good stuff, and generally skimping on your equipment isn't a great idea.
:]
Last edited by FrankTheDrummer at Jan 5, 2009,
#20
Quote by FrankTheDrummer
Okay so a generally...(amazing ****ing stuff) ...reproduces a single note.



Yeah,dude

His advice is totally solid and he covered everything


FrankTheDrummer, you should like, write a whole sticky or general drum thread and give all of us some advice and stuff; I see drumming related posts on here alot, and they rarely receive the answers, or at least, ones with the thoroughness of your responses, haha.
#21
I'll think about it..

If the demand was made or whatever I definitely would,

But I don't wanna spend a ton of time typing a professional document if the thread's gonna die in a week. Haha.
:]