#1
i was watching another lesson by Joe Pass today, and he explained this really cool idea. and i was wondering if any of you have used it before, and if you could help me understand it. he said its his idea to make songs interesting, instead of using the same scales.

his "idea" (i think, im kinda confused) is that a way to make your jazz songs interesting is just by picking a random note on one of the top two strings.
so lets just say, G#.
(he calls the note a pedal tone)

then what you do is, you play a chord with the G# on top.
any random chord, as long as the highest note in the chord is a G# (if you picked G#, thats just my example).

then you play a run, or just the scale, that that chord is made from.
so if my note is G#, lets say i use a Emaj7 chord in this voicing:

e--4--
B--4--
G--4--
D--6--
A--7--
E--x--

then, like i said, you do a run in the scale that includes a Emaj7 chord.


then after you do that, he said use the same note, but choose a different chord, and then do a run up to it.
it doesnt matter if the chord is in the same key, as long as it sounds good to your ears.

and my question is, is that a "style" or tool all jazz players use?
cause i know a progression that each chord has a desending note in it.
what i mean is, first chord has a D in it somewhere, second chord has a C# in it some where, third has a C in it somewhere, and so on and so forth, but every chord is in a different key.
is that the same thing that Joe Pass is trying to explain, only without the descending notes?

but basically my question is, the thing Joe Pass explained, do all jazz players do that? or is it just him?


EDIT: heres the lesson, it was very cool.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIZkQyREKf4
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Dec 25, 2008,
#2
That's slash chords I think. You just use different roots than the chord calls for. Take Stairway To Heaven. It has a beautiful A minor fingerpicking section at the start (you know what I'm talking about) but the root note on the D string goes A, G#, G, F#, F.

But I don't jazz, so if someone corrects me, then they're probably right .
#3
i play jazz

random notes?

never
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#4
Quote by Austyn6661
That's slash chords I think. You just use different roots than the chord calls for. Take Stairway To Heaven. It has a beautiful A minor fingerpicking section at the start (you know what I'm talking about) but the root note on the D string goes A, G#, G, F#, F.

But I don't jazz, so if someone corrects me, then they're probably right .

no i know what slash chords are.
but i was curious if all jazz players do the thing where he picks a "random" chord (im not sure if its random) and does a run in the scale that the chord is in....
idk, if you watch the video youll understand it more.
lol im confusing myself, because its a simple concept, i guess, but it sounds so perfect.


Joe Pass = AWSOME


EDIT:
i play jazz

random notes?

never


i know there isnt random notes, but every single chord is made from a different scale and in a different key, so to someone who doesnt know it exactly (like me) it seems random.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#5
Well, jazz is never in a scale usually (some guy who loved Kurt Cobain asked what scale would make hi sound jazzy once.) It's always like switching scales over the chord you're playing.

It seems like you know more about this subject than I do, so I'm gonna sneaky-snake my way out of this thread.
#6
Quote by Austyn6661
Well, jazz is never in a scale usually (some guy who loved Kurt Cobain asked what scale would make hi sound jazzy once.) It's always like switching scales over the chord you're playing.

It seems like you know more about this subject than I do, so I'm gonna sneaky-snake my way out of this thread.

lol
im here to learn more about music and talking about and try to teach music.
(i want to be a music teacher).
so any input is fine by me =]
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#7
It's a fun way to explore chord tones. That's pretty much it.

Allan Holdsworth's entire book on Melody Chords focuses on being able to play any chord with any note as the top note in the chord. Basically the opposite side of the same idea.
#8
Sounds like a guideline leading to disaster in most cases. I'm not saying guessing around doesn't work: The famous guitar intro to Pink Floyd's "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" was a complete happenstance, David Gilmour even says so himself. And it's one of my personal favorite moments in music. But in general, guessing, as I've learned through experience, is time-consuming and limiting, not to mention in many cases frustrating.
#9
Quote by Paquijón
Sounds like a guideline leading to disaster in most cases. I'm not saying guessing around doesn't work: The famous guitar intro to Pink Floyd's "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" was a complete happenstance, David Gilmour even says so himself. And it's one of my personal favorite moments in music. But in general, guessing, as I've learned through experience, is time-consuming and limiting, not to mention in many cases frustrating.

why does it sounds like disaster?
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#11
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
why does it sounds like disaster?


I never said the example given by the TS sounded like disaster, but rather the "technique". Maybe "disaster" isn't the appropriate word for it. How about, "unproductive"?

Also, awesome song, Freepower. I especially enjoyed 1:04 - end, using open strings in such a way has always been a favorite of mine.
#13
For clarification, Pass isn't talking about actually doing this DURING improvisation, or as a songwriting technique, but as a practice method to build a sense of location: when this chord, right here in this position, know instantly what you have this available to play.

Doing it this way isn't universal (really that's the first I've seen it) but the concepts are nothing new and practiced in different ways. It's a just a method, a specific isolation (a good one - always pay attention when mr. pass speaks, he's brilliant).