#1
I am an intermediate guitar player and I'm going to be playing in an indoor-drumline group through my school (it's percussion and guitar/bass playing rock-themed songs) and I think that learning to read music would be very beneficial for me to for guitar. I can already read notes off the staff, as I play 3 other instruments, but my problem with guitar is translating the note itself to a certain fret on my guitar (especially since there is more than one way to play each note). Does anyone have any advice or websites or anything that could help me out with this? Thanks.
#2
Whatever key the song is in, play the music as much as possible in that possition. Like if the song is in E minor, start with your hand all the way up at the seventh fret. Whenever I read music, I automatically go to the scale position and the notes come easier.
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#3
If you're ambitious enough you could pick up the Modern Method for Guitar series by William Leavitt. They are quite good for sight reading, but a lot of people seem to find them quite boring.
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#4
this may help...

scan the entire piece...find the lowest note and the highest note...find a scale/position that will cover those notes....if the difference is two octaves away...find the scale/position that will cover that note...

if you know your scales in all octaves you will be able move to the higher/lower octave...

look for familiar note sequences....scale runs...arpeggios...whole steps...cromatic runs etc...finger them if you have time before performing...

hope this helps


play well

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#5
I'm going through the same thing, I've been playing for four years and am trying to learn. I use a real book and will often try and sight read songs off of the paper (of course my sight reading right now involves stopping frequently =/) I always put my hand in whatever position the key is in and according to the feel (major/minor) like if the key sig is C but the song is in reality A minor in terms of feel then i go to fifth fret and work my way from there
#6
a non conventional way

if you photocopy the score , you can add a non conventional way of notating with a pencil which is a letter followed by a number :

you can play middle "c" as A3 or E8

when using this method for the high e string i suggest you use a little e , e8 being concert pitch middle c, as would be B1,G5 D10, A15 and E20 .

another method
another method is to use roman numerals for the fingerboard position ,numbers in circles for the strings and plain numbers for the fretting hand finger :

so :

II (5) 2

tells us the 2nd position on the 5th string use the middle finger ,
(the fret board position is where you place you index finger so with position 2 which is II you will place your index finger on he 2nd fret middle on the 3rd fret , ring on the 4th and pinky on the 5th )
#7
Quote by 451F
Whatever key the song is in, play the music as much as possible in that possition. Like if the song is in E minor, start with your hand all the way up at the seventh fret. Whenever I read music, I automatically go to the scale position and the notes come easier.

That's not particularly constructive, all that does is over-emphasise the physical aspects of playing the guitar...the threadstarter wants to learn more about music.

Best thing to do is just keep working on it....the more time you spend locating notes on the fretboard the more familiar you'll become withthem and the better you'll get at it.
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