#1
I need some opinions on this.


Basically I did some promotional work for a friend of mine, including some bassplaying.

He didn't pay me in any real sense but he's now offered to write me 20 tracks for 3 albums, and I would have total control over the style, speed and complexity, as well as writing the lyrics myself.

The problem: There is no guarantee that the album would actually get recorded, and it would take autonomy from my own band's stuff.

Should I accept the offer? Or should I run a mile?
#2
Ask him to write a few, maybe 2 or 3, see if you like 'em, if so, use them, and write some more with him. If not, just say..no?
#3
Quote by ReaperWaits
Ask him to write a few, maybe 2 or 3, see if you like 'em, if so, use them, and write some more with him. If not, just say..no?



Well I've heard his stuff and I do like it, but I am unsure as to whether I would want to be playing bass on that kind of track
#4
That's a bit of a weird trade off if you ask me. Just because songwriting is such a personal thing, and I can't imagine that anybody is going to be able to throw together 20 stellar songs as a favor. If you didn't expect anything from him in the first place, I wouldn't bother...If he is a friend ask him to buy you dinner sometime and call it even.
#5
Quote by take_it_t
That's a bit of a weird trade off if you ask me. Just because songwriting is such a personal thing, and I can't imagine that anybody is going to be able to throw together 20 stellar songs as a favor. If you didn't expect anything from him in the first place, I wouldn't bother...If he is a friend ask him to buy you dinner sometime and call it even.



I agree. This just seems kinda weird. I, personally, would just say no thanks.
#6
What's the alternative if you don't accept the deal? Does he pay you in cash or return the favour or something?

To be honest, weird as it sounds, I kinda like the idea of musicians writing songs for each other as payment for favours.
#7
Quote by SlackerBabbath
What's the alternative if you don't accept the deal? Does he pay you in cash or return the favour or something?

To be honest, weird as it sounds, I kinda like the idea of musicians writing songs for each other as payment for favours.



To be honest, I don't know. I may be able to nogociate some money.
#8
Do it all. Even the chance of making money off of doing something music related is not something you want to pass up. Seriously, run with it.
We're only strays.
#9
The only problem is that money has a value that is common to all people. Twenty dollars will buy you the same thing it will buy me. If I volunteer to write a song for someone, that song may be priceless to me, but valueless to anyone that person tries to pawn it off onto.

I'd be wary of such a proposition.

Look at it this way. How much money would otherwise be at stake? Fifty? A hundred? I personally wouldn't pay $100 for *anyone's* three albums, unless they had real collector's value. How much would you buy three of my albums for?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
To be honest, I don't know. I may be able to nogociate some money.


Hmmm, well if it was money, how would you figure out what to charge him? If it was the songs, how can you possibly place an accurate value on songs that haven't even been written yet? And furthermore, how can you guarrantee you will really own the songs? Let's say for instance that you record one of his songs and it ends up selling a million copies, what guarrantee do you have that he won't suddenly appear with the original score of your music claiming ownership of the material?

Personaly, and because he's a friend, I think the best thing to do is to just say thanks but no thanks to the songs and just have him return the favour some time. So If you find yourself needing help with promotion or needing a musician, or whatever, he's the guy you go to.
A lot of musicians friendships work like that, how many times have you heard people in the music business, from roadies up to music execs say 'I know a guy who owes me a favour.' ?

I do it all the time with other bands and musicians in my area. A mate might ring me up and say, 'Hey bud, any chance of borrowing your PA system? and if I'm not busy I might say, 'Yeah, OK.' and when they say 'How much?' I'll just say 'Owe me one!' Then the next time I'm organising a big gig with lots of bands in a large venue, that guy's band will either be playing for free or he'll be working the door for me or working the mixing desk or whatever.
#11
Reminds me of this one:
Current Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Gibson Explorer Standard
Tradition Strat
Crafter Acoustic

Peavey Classic 30
Line 6 DL4
Dano Fish 'n Chips
MXR Phase 90
Digitech Bad Monkey
Boss MD-2 Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby
#13
Well, I was thinking about it like this:

Say you agree and this guy is sitting their trying to write one of the songs for you. He messes around with a riff and some backing and finds something that he really likes. But he really likes it, so much so that he decides that he can't just give it to someone else so he decides to keep it for his own song.

This, for me, would be quite natural - if I thought of a really great intro I wouldn't want to give it to someone else. But if this guy keeps working in this way, what will the songs he gives to you end up as? The ideas that he didn't like enough to keep himself.

Because of this I'd be wary, it sounds like this guy just doesn't want to pay you so he thought offering to write songs would get him out of it.

If what you did was a small favour you could just say that you might want to ask him for a small favour sometime in the future. However, if you were expecting something in return then I'd ask for it, and not settle for this song stuff.