#1
1) learn songs together
2) cut a demo on an Indie label
3)play clubs
4)gain a following
5) send that demo to Major labels
#5
Ask yourself this, what other possible order can those five things be listed and make logical sense? But I would definitely gig first, gets you more attention and more confidence too. Do what suits your bands situation best

If you are asking this because you're getting subconsciencely aggrivated not getting those things accomplished, just remember, **** takes time my friend, **** will take time...

No offense..
#6
1) learn songs together
2)play clubs
3) cut a demo on an Indie label
4)gain a following
5) send that demo to Major labels

That's the only switch I would do.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc

Hi 5 man! this is what Im talkin bout!


Rig:
05' B.C. Rich Warlock
Line 6 Spide III 75 Watt Combo
Behringer Cry Babe
Digitech Death Metal
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Rodam Cables
D'aDarrio XL
Chain for a strap
#8
I'm amazed that everyone seems to assume an indie label will sign any new band that comes along. Indies are in business to make a profit. I know many established local bands who have been gigging, recording and touring for years without support from an indie either because a) various indies have looked at them and don't believe that the band will ship enough units to turn a profit or b) the band didn't think that being legally tied to an indie was in their best interest.
What you need to do is write songs. Not just any songs, but tight songs that have no bull**** in them. Edit, edit, edit. If you don't think a song is good enough, it's for damn sure your audience won't. Then, you practice, practice, practice until the songs are super tight. Play a few shows to get your live legs under you. Videotape them, and then critique the performance. What works? What doesn't? Is your interaction in a theatrical sense, tight? If not, why not? Record your songs, ideally at first in a cheap, demo studio (ideally on a bandmembers computer using a cheap DAW like Sonar or Cubase). Work out the arrangements. This will save you money when you record the songs in a real studio. Sell the demo at shows. Organize a small tour. And then take it from there.
#9
Koslacks got it right. Play clubs should come before you think about an indie label. Cut your own demos at home. Even if they're crap. Team up with someone who can record at home...Play shows. Play a LOT of shows. Play until you have a decent fan base locally. Then you can think about indie lables. But these days, some indie labels only do the distribution side of things so you can either record at a studio, send to labels, or the other way around, depends on the type of label. Some labels are tiny. But others are decent sized indie labels and will handle a lot of stuff.

Whatever you do, you need to know your stuff. Dominate the stage. Know what you're doing. This comes from playing more shows than you need to. If you have a decent local following you find it much easier to impress a label.

Labels aren't a charity. You want to be the walking dollar bill. Packed out local shows = people liking your band = money. Labels like money.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Dec 27, 2008,
#10
I'd have to disagree with Chris about playing a lot of shows about home, but I'm talking having only lived and played consistently in one city, which is not known for supporting local rock artists (Montreal. DJ's do great here, but our big rock acts all moved to Toronto to make it). Play shows, but at least here, odds are the only people coming are your friends and the friends of the other bands on the bill. The important thing her is to network with the soundmen and bar owners. Make sure they like you on a personal level so that when a bigger band comes through and needs another band on their bill, you're the first person asked. This is how my band has landed our bigger bills, because our members have played all the clubs repeatedly over the years. We've been asked to open for bands such as 10 Foot Pole, The Ataris, Gob and The Planet Smashers simply because we became friendly with the managers and owners of venues.
A word of advice: to build a fanbase, you should hit small towns. Metropolitan centers have a million things to do at night other than check out no name bands. In small towns, people take entertainment where they can get it, and will adopt a band they like as if it's their own.
#11
Ah, sorry. What I forgot to mention in my post was, that playing shows in your home town is often a good place to start, getting experience. You don't want to restrict yourself but it's a good place to keep it on the D low for a while, when you're really sorting yourself out.

Playing lots of parties, etc. Getting people around you to know who you are. Then you can think about elsewhere. But yeah, all good points, making friends with bar managers, other bands etc. is always a good idea. Making friends with other bands can get you some sweeet gigs.
#12
Here's mine...
1. Learn songs and get them tight... if they're not tight, they're not going up on stage
2. Play small gigs
3. Build up your fanbase
4. Try to get signed
5. Get an album


About the major label... it might not ever happen. It's about who you know and who wants you. I also don't really suggest dpoing this because they *could* start turning you into some mainstream radio tool... not saying all mainstream is bad but they the major labels look at you as money. If if you're not pulling in enough money they'll try to change your style so you are.
bro0otal

Drummer



Guitarist___________Bassist________________Vox______________________Lead Guitarist
______________________________________________________
#13
Koslack and Chris are both right here.

Most indie labels will not pay for you to record. They are small businesses that will help promote and distribute you once you have a product ready for market.

You did notice the word 'business' right? Just like the majors, they ain't interested unless they can take it to the bank. The difference between an indie and a major is the amounts of money involved.

Compare an independent store to a major chain store:

An independent store will take a product from a person in the community and put it in their store. It might only make them a few bucks, but doesn't really cost them anything to put it on their shelf. They will only advertise it if they figure it will help bring people into the store. They have the independent freedom to choose what they sell and what they do not sell. A few bucks is better than no bucks.

A corporate chain store spends a lot more money, and as a result also risks a lot more money. However, they're not stupid. They don't risk money for sport, and tend to get upset when those risks don't pan out. They are calculated risks. They have so much product and so much staff that if something is only going to make them a few bucks, it costs them more to stock it than they will make on it by selling dozens of units. They'll say no based on that alone. If they want to promote it and market it, they are looking at big bucks. It had better sell. It's not a wish. It is a demand.

This is where the "if you're not pulling in enough money, they'll try to change your style so you are" comes in. The indie labels, seeing you lose money, will give you advice on how to do better, and if you don't, they'll just stop plugging you and let you rot on their roster. It's not like they're going to throw good money after bad. They have to eat too. A major label has that infrastructure and experience to draw from, and will give you access to it in order to make money. If that means re-packaging you with a different corporate image, adjusting your product to make it more marketable, then so be it. They'll coach you through that, and with their experience, you can all win - though it will require a compromise. You can refuse to take it. At that point, they drop you immediately, because it costs them money in accounting, paperwork, etc. just to keep you on the list. They'll just let you swing before they let that happen.

We had our CD completed before we played any more than a couple of shows or so. Our rationale for that was that we would be taken more seriously and given a lot more credibility by actually having something for sale, compared to being a bunch of yahoos who just thought they'd throw together a band. It seemed to work.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
I strongly recomend against any label. Start your own. D.I.Y and you get 100% of the profits.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc

Hi 5 man! this is what Im talkin bout!


Rig:
05' B.C. Rich Warlock
Line 6 Spide III 75 Watt Combo
Behringer Cry Babe
Digitech Death Metal
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Rodam Cables
D'aDarrio XL
Chain for a strap
#16
Quote by xEpidemicx
I strongly recomend against any label. Start your own. D.I.Y and you get 100% of the profits.


The problem with this is that with a label, you already have a network set up. You have distribution, advertising money, tour connections, etc... If you start your own, these things don't magically happen. Also, you mention you get 100% of the profits; the reverse is also true. You have all the risk and are responsible for raising all the capital.
#17
Quote by koslack
The problem with this is that with a label, you already have a network set up. You have distribution, advertising money, tour connections, etc... If you start your own, these things don't magically happen. Also, you mention you get 100% of the profits; the reverse is also true. You have all the risk and are responsible for raising all the capital.


I meant do everything yourself. Advertise, distribute, book shows, ect... do it all yourself. The less contracts you sign the less likely you will get ripped off.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc

Hi 5 man! this is what Im talkin bout!


Rig:
05' B.C. Rich Warlock
Line 6 Spide III 75 Watt Combo
Behringer Cry Babe
Digitech Death Metal
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Rodam Cables
D'aDarrio XL
Chain for a strap
#18
What kosklack was saying was that it is a tradeoff.

Would you rather have 100% of 2000 sales, or 10% of 500 000 sales?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Quote by xEpidemicx
I meant do everything yourself. Advertise, distribute, book shows, ect... do it all yourself. The less contracts you sign the less likely you will get ripped off.


That's fine on a local level, but try setting that up nationally. **** costs money, bro. And if you don't turn a profit, those losses are entirely yours.