#1
when people say that light gauged strings feel "rubbery" or likewise, do they mean that the string bounces up and down too much the harder and faster you pick?

i'm currently using 9's, and when i play fast chromatic scales or anything fast, my picking hand feels "out of touch" with the strings. like the strings aren't where they're supposed to be. does this have anything to do with my gauge or i simply suck?
#2
Did you change your string gauge? A lot of people don't like 9s because they're pretty much just used for standard tuning and you can't do drop tunings well with them. Others don't like them simply because they're lighter, they feel loose and they don't like the tone of them. However there are a lot of people that like them because they're easy to do bends with. Really, it's all just preference.
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#3
i think its mostly the string, im sure if your technique is good you can do fine on 9's but i use 11's or lower for that reason, i like the skinny top heavy bottom's by ernie ball, they're like a set of 11-10's on top, and like 12 or 13's on bottom, good for fast riffing and drop d
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#4
if youre doing reasonably fast alternate picking the strings just move out of the way instead of actually being plucked, but you get used to it
#5
Quote by thsrayas
Did you change your string gauge? A lot of people don't like 9s because they're pretty much just used for standard tuning and you can't do drop tunings well with them. Others don't like them simply because they're lighter, they feel loose and they don't like the tone of them. However there are a lot of people that like them because they're easy to do bends with. Really, it's all just preference.

you mean they bend too easily? vibrate too much as you pick harder?
#6
Quote by lozlovesstrats
if youre doing reasonably fast alternate picking the strings just move out of the way instead of actually being plucked, but you get used to it

i was hoping that heavier gauged strings don't "move out of the way" that much, which helps me a bit.
#7
Edit your posts, don't double post.

Yes, light gauge strings bend easily. Some people like how easy it is to bend them, others don't and it sounds like you're the latter. Heavier gauged strings will stay in place easier so try a heavier gauge but remember that you might have to set up your guitar for the new strings since the tension will be different (adjusting the truss rod and possibly your bridge).
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#8
i love the ease on my fretting hand but at the same time hate the over-vibration on the picking hand side. what gauge should i try now? 11's or 12's?
#9
After years and years of experimenting I finally found a setup that suit me perfectly. I use a mix of 10's and 9's. My low E and A are from a 10 set, and the D G and B strings are from a 9 set, and the high E from a 10. I use the High E as I find the .9 sting too sloppy. I use the middle strings from a 9 set, as this makes some of the rather untraditional chording techniques I sometimes use easier. I use the two low strings from the 10 set as this provides a bit more bass/deeper sound than if those were 9's.

Lots of people will tell you that heavier gauges are the only way to go, and they are much fuller sounding. IMO heaveier strings dont sound better, but merely different. And too heavy strings will IMO take a bit of the enjoyment of playing away, as you have to fight the strings more´. I used 11's for a couple of months once, and after a 2-3 hour session my wrist were aching a bit. And I found that my sound was too heavy and bassy for this option to be the best. As you can see from my setup, I have found a compromis between 9's and 10's. IMO thin gauges dont sound worse than thicker ones, but simply sound more trebly, and tend to be clearer/ less muddy than thicker counterparts.( which is another reason I have lighter gagues on the middle strings) And as for comfort it's all about finding the strings that arent too sloppy, nor too thick causing playing to be strenuous.

Hope youll find the right setup good luck

edit: I always play in std tuning
Guitars:
Gibson L. P std. 2006
Gibson L. P studio
Höfner asj228
Main amp:
Marshall 2061x HW head
Marshall 2061cx cab
fx:
Stock BD-2
TU-2
verbzilla
C.M. Red repeat
T-rex F.T.
Practice:
Epi vjr head
2x12 V30 cab and 4x10 G10 cab
#10
Quote by necrophilic
i love the ease on my fretting hand but at the same time hate the over-vibration on the picking hand side. what gauge should i try now? 11's or 12's?


try 10's then 11's, then maybe 12's (that's light in acoustic strings)

if your hands are strong enough 11's should give you the tension you want w/o being too hard to bend, i always prefer to use heavier strings and build up my callouses, in make acoustic playing easier too, and i like the sound much better, i don't like the thinness of light string sound
Quote by strq010
this guy, Nihil, is currently my hero.

Quote by clincher09
Why is Jesus a dinosaur?
#12
Quote by necrophilic
what do you do with the remaining strings assuming that you buy sets?


I guess that was for me I just throw the rest in the trash But really strings are cheap as chips, and the d'addarios i use and love keep their tone for a decent amount of times anyways I'd rather pay 6 bucks for a string set that is just right for me, than 3 for a set thats not so perfect But really experimentation is the way to go about strings i'd say. but here are a couple of rules to summarize my last and way too long post

- A thinner string will be more sloppy, but easier to fret, vibrato, bend, use crazy techniques etc.
- A thicker string will be easier to pick quickly, as the tension is greater.
- A thinner string will give you more treble than a thicker string, whereas a thicker will give you more bass than a thin.
Guitars:
Gibson L. P std. 2006
Gibson L. P studio
Höfner asj228
Main amp:
Marshall 2061x HW head
Marshall 2061cx cab
fx:
Stock BD-2
TU-2
verbzilla
C.M. Red repeat
T-rex F.T.
Practice:
Epi vjr head
2x12 V30 cab and 4x10 G10 cab