#1
My guitar is up at uni so i thought i would brush up on my theory and finally learn modes. Now here's my question, if i had a chord progression in C Major like so :

C , F , Am , G for example.

And i were to improvise in 'mixolydian', would that be essentially the F Major scale, (C D E F G A Bb C), or would it be, 'C mixolydian over the C chord', 'F mixolydian over the F chord' etc etc. Because the Bb over the Am chord would sound harsh, but is this the purpose of modes, to get weird sounds?

Thanks in advance and i apoligise for another mode thread.
#2
Quote by Hairboi_
My guitar is up at uni so i thought i would brush up on my theory and finally learn modes. Now here's my question, if i had a chord progression in C Major like so :

C , F , Am , G for example.

And i were to improvise in 'mixolydian', would that be essentially the F Major scale, (C D E F G A Bb C), or would it be, 'C mixolydian over the C chord', 'F mixolydian over the F chord' etc etc. Because the Bb over the Am chord would sound harsh, but is this the purpose of modes, to get weird sounds?

Thanks in advance and i apoligise for another mode thread.



^ Your in C Major. Using modes in the way you are suggesting would be inappropriate in this situation. Just use C major for the whole thing.
shred is gaudy music
#3
That progression is in C major. It clearly resolves to C after the last G chord, which is the dominant of C major. Therefore, you play C major over this. Not G mixolydian, or F lydian o B locrian but C major.


There are lots of threads on how to know when something is modal and when it isn't.
#5
A mode is a Key, you seem terribly confused.

People really make modes out to be more important than they are, especially on this website.. you really should slow down and get to where you understand the major scale in and out before you start getting into modes
#6
No.. Modes are also useful to play over chord changes when there's no diatonic relationship between them. They are also useful to create different sounds in the same key (switching from C major to G Mixolydian, by changing the progression so it resolves to G).

The following is an excerpt from something I wrote a while ago, as a way to show the differences of the modes and a different way to look at them. (Be sure toc heck out xxdarrenxx's thread on creating modal progressions, it's very good).

"For example;

Let's say the key is C, common progressions would be the standard I-IV-V-I major progression, or the standard vi-IV-V minor progression. You probably already know that these have their own distinct quality and sound to them.

Using modes in the key of C, you can create entirely different sounds, using the SAME notes. It really isn't hard to understand, because the same is happening when you use the natural minor mode (Aeolian) in C. Apply the modes in the same way you would apply the minor mode ---> Use the flavour note of the mode, and use the chords that suggest it and emphasize it. The thing is though, the rest of the modes aren't so strong as the relative major and minor. Therefore, it's REALLY important you focus on the chords + melody to outline the mode.

If that doesn't make sense, try to look at modes in this way.

C Ionian : standard major -> CDEFGAB
C Dorian : "altered" minor -> CDEbFGABb
C Phrygian: "altered" minor -> CDdEbFGAbBb
C Lydian: "altered" major -> CDEF#GAB
C Mixolydian: "altered" major-> CDEFGABb
C Aeolian: standard minor -> CDEbFGAbBb
C Locrian: diminished -> CDdEbFGbAbBb

I used the term "altered minor" and "altered major", that's because I want you to look at the minor modes in relation to the natural minor, and the major modes in relation to the major scale. That way, you will be able to see the differences more easily.

Let's look at C Major and C Lydian, you will see they share the same notes, except for the raised 4th in C Lydian (F#). So basically, the only difference between these scales is the 4th. So how would you use C Lydian in comparison to C Major? That's easy! Use the note which defines C Lydian, and DISTINGUISHES it from C major. Remember, that's ONLY the raised 4th. Bearing that in mind, you would want to create a chord progression which emphasizes the difference between C and C Lydian.

Now look at this;

C major contains these chords; C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bdim
C Lydian contains these chords: C - D - Em - F#dim - G - Am - Bm

Merely using the I, V and vi chord won't give you the distinctive Lydian sound, as it shares those with C major. (It will end up sounding like C major). However, the D major, F#dim and Bm give C Lydian it's distinctive sound.

So you would want to create a chord progression that uses those chords appropiately. I will give an example;

Cmaj13#11 (the #11 is the raised 4th, the F#) - F#m7b5 - Bm7 - Cmaj7#11

This is just one example of a C Lydian progression, you can use more chords as well (I-iii-II-vii-I progression), but bear in mind that it gets harder and harder to make it resolve back to it's tonic, it will most likely want to move to G or Em if you don't do it properly. (Respectively, the relative major and minor).

Do this comparison with the rest of the modes as well, figure out what note distinguishes it from the standard major or minor scale."
#7
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#8
Just read through that myself. Thank you for writing that darren.
Practice. Play. Sleep. Repeat.

Quote by pearlJam_31490
i take it next your going to tell me that Cb is a note too!
#9
Quote by Hairboi_
My guitar is up at uni so i thought i would brush up on my theory and finally learn modes. Now here's my question, if i had a chord progression in C Major like so :

C , F , Am , G for example.

And i were to improvise in 'mixolydian', would that be essentially the F Major scale, (C D E F G A Bb C), or would it be, 'C mixolydian over the C chord', 'F mixolydian over the F chord' etc etc. Because the Bb over the Am chord would sound harsh, but is this the purpose of modes, to get weird sounds?

Thanks in advance and i apoligise for another mode thread.

The parent major scale to C Mixolydian is F Major.

I disagree with most of the responses above. You can use C Mixolydian as a kind of altered scale for melodic ideas over this progression.

However, the third in the G is a B natural and the C Mixolydian modal note is Bb. So there is potential for a clash here. Just be careful with the Bb modal note over this chord and play around with it.

EDIT: And yes if you were using improvising in Mixolydian you would tend to use C Mixolydian over the whole thing (except maybe the last chord, or the Am as you point out, which you might or might not raise the Bb to a B natural depending on what you're after).
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 27, 2008,
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
You can use C Mixolydian as a kind of altered scale for melodic ideas over this progression.



I have to disagree with that. It's a standard I - IV - vi- V progression in major. Thinking modally here is really unnecessary and inappropriate. I suppose you could convince me if you made a recording of yourself playing C Mixolydian over that entire progression and make it sound good.

* of course if your intention is to play something that sounds out of place or mismatched, then of course any scale other than C Major will do........ including C Mixolydian.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 27, 2008,
#11
Perhaps not the first choice over such a progression but that doesn't mean one can't do it.

Also even if one were to think this way (Mixolydian) when constructing a melody/lead over the progression one could just as well interpret the Bb as nothing more than an accidental in the key of C rather than analysing the melody/lead as a "modal/mixolydian" melody/lead.

That's not to say one can't interpret it either way. There is no right or wrong here it's just a matter of taste and preference.
Si
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
I have to disagree with that. It's a standard I - IV - vi- V progression in major. Thinking modally here is really unnecessary and inappropriate. I suppose you could convince me if you made a recording of yourself playing C Mixolydian over that entire progression and make it sound good.

* of course if your intention is to play something that sounds out of place or mismatched, then of course any scale other than C Major will do........ including C Mixolydian.
Why is it unnecessary and inappropriate? If it's tastefull and sounds good and if you have the skill for it, why not?

C mixolydian over the WHOLE progression wouldn't really work, but T/S's second suggestion (C mixo over C, F mixo over F, A dorian/aeolian/phrygian over Am) would work. It's called playing the changes. Although it's hard, some musicians prefer it as they can tailor their sound more than basing the solo around only one scale.

I like 20's suggestion. I think he means to play this scale: C D E F G A Bb B C, which fits all the chords and has notes from both C mixolydian and C ionian. I think it's called polymodalism?

The other way to play modally (which is more for composers than improvisers) is to write a melody, make it resolve on another note other than the tonal center of the parent scale then write a few countermelodies to it. This is how modal music used to be made.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#13
TS,

If you want to play modally, your progression can only really consist of two chords maximum, and each chord doesn't have be a diatonic relationship to the other. More importantly, to emphasise modal playing, a chord needs to be prolonged to a good few bars before a change.

If you do decide to keep the chords diatonic, that's fine, but don't go beyond two chords in a progression, plus don't stray to far from the root chord. There is a huge risk of a V-I (Dominant to Tonic) movement. You don't wnat this as it will immediately suggest tonal harmony.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 29, 2008,
#14
Quote by demonofthenight
Why is it unnecessary and inappropriate? If it's tastefull and sounds good and if you have the skill for it, why not?





Quote by demonofthenight

C mixolydian over the WHOLE progression wouldn't really work,

You answered your own question.

So why wouldn't it really work?
hmmmmm, maybe because it won't sound appropriate?


Quote by demonofthenight

but T/S's second suggestion (C mixo over C, F mixo over F, A dorian/aeolian/phrygian over Am) would work. It's called playing the changes. Although it's hard, some musicians prefer it as they can tailor their sound more than basing the solo around only one scale.



Out of curiosity, do you have any experience with this approach, and could you make a recording of yourself doing exactly what you suggest? I'm interested in hearing you present something aurally that you think sounds good that's been done with your suggested approach. I would be more convinced by hearing you successfully taking that approach, then I would by reading your suppositions about it.

btw, the term " changes", generally refers to a change in tonality. in a stock I IV vi V progression, there are no " changes".


Quote by demonofthenight

I like 20's suggestion. I think he means to play this scale: C D E F G A Bb B C, which fits all the chords and has notes from both C mixolydian and C ionian. I think it's called polymodalism?


^ thats your suggestion, not his. He suggested using Mixolydian over the entire progression, which you already said " wouldn't really work". And btw thats just a Major scale with a chromatic note thrown in. Not the same thing is Mixolydian.
Also do you think polymodalism is a good place to start for someone that's just learning about modes? I would suggest that it's not.

Quote by 20Tigers
Perhaps not the first choice over such a progression but that doesn't mean one can't do it.

Also even if one were to think this way (Mixolydian) when constructing a melody/lead over the progression one could just as well interpret the Bb as nothing more than an accidental in the key of C rather than analysing the melody/lead as a "modal/mixolydian" melody/lead.

That's not to say one can't interpret it either way. There is no right or wrong here it's just a matter of taste and preference.

Ofcourse you can do whatever you want, but Im not going to suggest the complicated and uncommon to a person that said they are "brushing up on there theory and finally getting into modes".
Also by your reasoning you could play any scale over that progression and find some way to justify it. I just don't see the point in peddling that kind of approach to someone who clearly needs a more solid grasp on the basics.

think of learning theory as if you're building a house:

- build the foundation first. without a solid foundation the rest of your house comes crashing down.


Taste and preference is developed through experience. My experience tells me that C mixolydian over a stock C Major progression is going to sound out of place and mismatched. Not sure if thats what the TS is going for, but my instinct says probably not.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 28, 2008,
#15
Ok, i kinda understand, so if it was a continuous C7 , F i could play C Mixolydian? As the Bb is in the C7 chord, and is in the F Major scale?
#16
Quote by Hairboi_
Ok, i kinda understand, so if it was a continuous C7 , F i could play C Mixolydian? As the Bb is in the C7 chord, and is in the F Major scale?


well kinda, but not exactly. Because C7 to F is a Dominant - Tonic relationship, it will likely be heard as V - I in F, so what would be more appropriate to just think of it as F Major. ( assuming you're just going back and forth between C7 - F for say one measure each)

if you have a progression where C7 is the tonal center, then C mixolydian would be appropriate. For instance a C7 vamp ( continuous C7)..... would be an appropriate place to play C mixolydian over.

To really understand modes, you need to have a solid grasp of basic theory up to the point of being able to recognize stock major and minor progressions in many if not all keys, and being able to recognize the relationships between the modes and their parent scales. you should also be able to see the modes as unique individual scales with their own unique formulas and sounds.

for instance if you are aware that the courts are the key of C are:

C Dm Em F G Am Bdim C

And you're aware of the relationship between D Dorian and C major. you should be able to make a D dorian chord progression that utilizes the same key signature as C Major ( no sharps no flats), but whose tonal center is D minor.

For instance a vamp that goes from Dm - Em, or Dm - G7 would be inappropriate place to play D Dorian.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 28, 2008,
#17
OK, let me try again, C 1 bar, C 1 bar, C 1 bar, D/C 1 bar, repeat.

This could be C Lydian?
#18
Quote by Hairboi_
OK, let me try again, C 1 bar, C 1 bar, C 1 bar, D/C 1 bar, repeat.

This could be C Lydian?


yeah, C Lydian would be appropriate there.
shred is gaudy music
#19
So to be able to play in a certain mode, you have to use chords that are in the key (C in this example), but the chords you choose are based around the notes that are different from the usual scale. Like emphasising the #4 in lydian? or b7 in mixolydian
#20
Well, a modal chord progression will have a different tonal centre than the parent scale.
So a D dorian progression utilizes the key sig of no sharps or flats, but has a Dm tonal center instead of C.

The modes do offer some different colors such as the #11 (#4), and b7 as you suggest.
shred is gaudy music
#21
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, a modal chord progression will have a different tonal centre than the parent scale.
So a D dorian progression utilizes the key sig of no sharps or flats, but has a Dm tonal center instead of C.

The modes do offer some different colors such as the #11 (#4), and b7 as you suggest.


Wouldn't D dorian have the same key sig as D minor? One flat. The B naturals would be written in as accidentals. I was taught that modes are not keys, and you use key sig of whatever minor or major key it is in.

Edit: I think I missed the context of your statement.
#22
Quote by blueriver
Wouldn't D dorian have the same key sig as D minor? One flat. The B naturals would be written in as accidentals. I was taught that modes are not keys, and you use key sig of whatever minor or major key it is in.

Edit: I think I missed the context of your statement.



No, D dorian would be written in the same Key sig as C major. You use the signature of the parent scale. It sounds like you learned about modes here at UG?

You may be confusing the fact that D Dorian is a minor type of scale and is comparable to the natural minor scale with the only difference being that it has a raised/natural 6th.

my guess is that you saw somebody's explanation like this:

Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 n6 b7

and made the assumption that they would also share the same key signature? ( an easy mistake to make when it's presented that way and/or if you don't have any experience reading modal music)


While this relationship is very important to understand for application purposes, it is also important to understand the relationship to the parent scale, as it's this relationship that gives us the proper key (commonly used) signature.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 28, 2008,
#23
Quote by Hairboi_
My guitar is up at uni so i thought i would brush up on my theory and finally learn modes. Now here's my question, if i had a chord progression in C Major like so :

C , F , Am , G for example.

And i were to improvise in 'mixolydian', would that be essentially the F Major scale, (C D E F G A Bb C), or would it be, 'C mixolydian over the C chord', 'F mixolydian over the F chord' etc etc. Because the Bb over the Am chord would sound harsh, but is this the purpose of modes, to get weird sounds?

Thanks in advance and i apoligise for another mode thread.

Quote by GuitarMunky
Of course you can do whatever you want, but Im not going to suggest the complicated and uncommon to a person that said they are "brushing up on there theory and finally getting into modes".
Also by your reasoning you could play any scale over that progression and find some way to justify it. I just don't see the point in peddling that kind of approach to someone who clearly needs a more solid grasp on the basics.

Well I was just trying to answer his question, which, as I read it was if I had a progression that resolved to C Major and I were to play some Mixolydian improv over it would I a) apply Mixolydian over the whole thing, or b)play mixolydian over each individual chord?

Unfortunately the progression wasn't modal itself which makes it a bit more of an adventurous proposition. But who am I to determine that he can't handle such an idea.

And the argument that you could use any progression and find some way to justify it. Well, it's not like I'm suggesting he use C#major over a C Major progression.

C Mixolydian is rooted in C and is a "major" mode. This gives it the essential elements to work over the C Major progression but with the one modal note different (Bb) it is different enough to form the basis of exploring some less tread sonic territory. It may be less tread because it is dangerous territory but that's how you learn - from experimenting and putting a foot wrong every once in a while.

Anyway maybe when I get some time I'll see what I can do using C Mixo over that particular progression.

EDIT:
Quote by mdc
TS,

If you want to play modally, your progression can only really consist of two chords maximum, and each chord doesn't have be a diatonic relationship to the other. More importantly, to emphasise modal playing, a chord needs to be prolonged to a good few bars before a change.

If you do decide to keep the chords diatonic, that's fine, but don't go beyond two chords in a progression, there is a huge risk of a V-I (Dominant to Tonic) movement. You don't wnat this as it will immediately suggest tonal harmony....

...But it's not going to imply the sounds of these modes because it doesn't follow the rules stated in my 1st two para's.

Those are not "rules" and do not need be followed. It is good advice for someone starting out in modes but not something you should consider "rules" that must be followed in order to achieve a modal sound.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 28, 2008,
#24
Quote by 20Tigers


Unfortunately the progression wasn't modal itself


Exactly, that was the point of my first post.

Quote by 20Tigers
But who am I to determine that he can't handle such an idea.


I can generally tell where a person is based on the question they ask. especially if someone says they are " finally getting in the modes"....... that says to me that they know very little about modes, and are just beginning to discover them.

Quote by 20Tigers

And the argument that you could use any progression and find some way to justify it. Well, it's not like I'm suggesting he use C#major over a C Major progression.

well it's the same concept, except that C#major over a C Major progression is a far more extreme example.


Quote by 20Tigers

C Mixolydian is rooted in C and is a "major" mode. This gives it the essential elements to work over the C Major progression but with the one modal note different (Bb) it is different enough to form the basis of exploring some less tread sonic territory. It may be less tread because it is dangerous territory but that's how you learn - from experimenting and putting a foot wrong every once in a while.

Anyway maybe when I get some time I'll see what I can do using C Mixo over that particular progression.



C mixolydian over a C major vamp would work fine, because you would basically be defining it as C7 by utilizing the Bb.

When you have a chord progression though, it's a little more locked in. I'm assuming here btw, that your goal would be to play something that sounds consistent with common practice. If you're trying to play "out", then there are a multitude of options. as I said before though I don't see those options as being appropriate for someone that doesn't have the background to understand them. Artistically though, you can do what ever you want, of course. If playing C mixolydian over a standard C Major progression gives you the sound you want, then that's what you should use.

btw if you do make a recording of yourself playing C mixo over that entire C Major progression, I would be happy to listen to it. I'm more convinced by actual aural examples than I am by supposition.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 28, 2008,
#25
Quote by 20Tigers
Those are not "rules" and do not need be followed. It is good advice for someone starting out in modes but not something you should consider "rules" that must be followed in order to achieve a modal sound.

"Guidelines" then, and they should be followed.

Let me know when you have a modal progression that contains 3 or more chords that are diatonic, with you soloing over them.

I'd luv to here it. I'm sure I'll be blown away by it.

I suggest you listen to the album "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis which explores modality in its entirety.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 29, 2008,
#26
Quote by GuitarMunky
No, D dorian would be written in the same Key sig as C major. You use the signature of the parent scale. It sounds like you learned about modes here at UG?

You may be confusing the fact that D Dorian is a minor type of scale and is comparable to the natural minor scale with the only difference being that it has a raised/natural 6th.

my guess is that you saw somebody's explanation like this:

Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 n6 b7

and made the assumption that they would also share the same key signature? ( an easy mistake to make when it's presented that way and/or if you don't have any experience reading modal music)


While this relationship is very important to understand for application purposes, it is also important to understand the relationship to the parent scale, as it's this relationship that gives us the proper key (commonly used) signature.


I see. I figured D dorian has D as its tonal center so it would have D minor as a key sig. I haven't encountered any modal sheet music apparently.
#27
Quote by mdc
"Guidelines" then, and they should be followed.

Let me know when you have a modal progression that contains 3 or more chords that are diatonic, with you soloing over them.

I'd luv to here it. I'm sure I'll be blown away by it.

I suggest you listen to the album "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis which explores modality in its entirety.


Check 2nd link in my sig and watch the vid example of me soloing over Mixolydian mode (3 chords).

Or check out Phrygian also 3 chords. So far I had 7 people that asked me if I played eastern scales in the Phrygian vamp, so i'd call it pretty effective.

They didn't understand that I only used notes from the C major scale for the entire Phrygian piece.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#28
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Check 2nd link in my sig and watch the vid example of me soloing over Mixolydian mode (3 chords).

Or check out Phrygian also 3 chords. So far I had 7 people that asked me if I played eastern scales in the Phrygian vamp, so i'd call it pretty effective.

They didn't understand that I only used notes from the C major scale for the entire Phrygian piece.

I'll check em out, I'm on the net at the gym right now and I haven't got my ear phones (don't have a pooter at home).

I had a quick look at the progressions and you've managed to avoid the V-I movement in both modes, but do they resolve to Em (Phrygian) and E7 (Mixolydian)? I can't here right now obviously. If they do resolve, then you've got a 3 chord diatonic modal progression.

Some smart ass is gonna come on here and say "yeah they resolve mate, so stfu" before I log bak in tomorrow.

I'm bak in tomorrow.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 29, 2008,
#29
Quote by mdc
I'll check em out, I'm on the net at the gym right now and I haven't got my ear phones (don't have a pooter at home).

I had a quick look at the progressions and you've managed to avoid the V-I movement in both modes, but do they resolve to Em (Phrygian) and E7 (Mixolydian)? I can't here right now obviously. If they do resolve, then you've got a 3 chord diatonic modal progression.

Some smart ass is gonna come on here and say "yeah they resolve mate, so stfu" before I log bak in tomorrow.

I'm bak in tomorrow.


Well they don't resolve ala cadence, but those are the "home" sounding chords or "tonal centre's".

Might not like the music style, but it doesn't sound awkwardly wrong anywhere and it flows natural.

On the Phrygian 1 it goes G - F - E. It's more logical to make that last E a C and that would resolve stronger. However, because of the section before that goes E - F; An E chord sounds right and the major C chord sounds actually awkward and "out of style" with the solo and rest of the progression (going from a dark feel suddenly to a 5 - 4 -1 progression, it sounds so cheesy I actually want to eat babies if I'd play that chord).

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#30
"Guidelines" then, and they should be followed.

Let me know when you have a modal progression that contains 3 or more chords that are diatonic, with you soloing over them.


Umm what about this progression? Dm6-Em-F-C-Dm6

It has 4 chords, and resolves to Dm (D Dorian progression)..

The following are common progressions;

I - IV - V - I --> Ionian mode

ii - iii - IV - I - ii --> Dorian mode

iii - ii - vi - IV - iii --> Phrygian mode

IV - vi -V - iii - IV --> Lydian mode

V - IV - I - V --> Mixolydian mode

vi - V - IV - V - vi --> Aeolian mode
#31
^^Well, you've utilized an imperfect cadence on the Mixolydian example, IV-V. Although it is known as THE weakest cadence out of all the cadences.

I'll come bak tomorrow m8 and have a nose at this Barry White.
#32
TS: You want to play C major throughout, and stress the notes of the corresponding chord being played. This is basically changing modes every chord but it a much simpler way of thinking.
#33
Quote by mdc
^^Well, you've utilized an imperfect cadence on the Mixolydian example, IV-V. Although it is known as THE weakest cadence out of all the cadences.

I'll come bak tomorrow m8 and have a nose at this Barry White.


True, but I did something smart there.

The progression can be seen as a V - I - (IV) in A Major, but the 3rd chord is ironically exactly what makes it modal. I made the A chord (the 2nd chord)with the C# in the bass/root(1st inversion).

Here follows an example of what I mean;


e|-----|
B|-5-7-|
G|-6-7-|
D|-7-7-|
A|-4-5-|
E|-----|


the C# is the leading tone compared to the next chord. I know this isn't the leading tone in the key, but aurally it "wants" to go (or is aurally nice to go) to the 2nd chord (D in the example). If I play an E7 then I continue with the ascending fashion.

Although it doesn't sound resolved like a cadence, it does focus the attention on the E7 chord in a perfectly acceptable musical idea, as well as E Mixolydian being the nicest sounding set of notes to use over this progression.

If I played a normal A (no inversion), then it would lean more toward a V - I - (IV) progression in A.

This is a musical "smart" way of bending around the rules.

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The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#34
*Sigh* OK. I don't wanna stray away from the TS's question. TS, your progression has a V-I (G-C) movement. It's tonal, and in C major. C Mixolydian won't work. If you want to play C Mixolydian, go by the guidelines set in post #13.

I'll repeat this quote again for emphasis with a slight edit.
Quote by Chewbacca
I suggest you listen to the album "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis which explores modality in its entirety. Modal jazz is the correct term, listen to this, alot. The fact that it's not guitar music is irrelevant. Guys like Miles, John Coltrane, and Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock were pioneers of this stuff.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 29, 2008,