#1
how do i know the correct way to call an interval?

for example, when should it be third major and when should it be diminished fourth?
Last edited by alexcp94 at Dec 27, 2008,
#2
depends how the notes are written.
For example, E to G# is a major third, but if the G# was written as Ab (because they're enharmonic) E to Ab is a dim fourth.

edit: for extra clarification just in case you didn't know this, E to A is 4 notes and E to G is three notes so that's why the interval changes. like E to A is even if it's Eb to Ax(double sharp) which is as large as a minor sixth, its still a fourth. You probably know that, but I just wanted to be clear in case you were new.

edit again: yeah the guy below me gave a better answer for how you name an interval in context. haha, I probably answered the question wrong.
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Last edited by sharpiemarker at Dec 27, 2008,
#3
If you've got two enharmonic equavilents in a scale such as a sharpened 3rd or a flattened 4th you go for the one which hasnt been repeated. For example you'd say - 1, 2, 3, flat 4. Not 1, 2, 3, sharp 3. etc. Thats convention but obviously in some scales its unavoidable. For the chord usually you just take the 1st, 3rd and 5th note of the scale so just name the notes and intervals of the chord as you would the scale.
#4
Quote by sharpiemarker
depends how the notes are written.
For example, E to G# is a major third, but if the G# was written as Ab (because they're enharmonic) E to Ab is a dim fourth.

edit: for extra clarification just in case you didn't know this, E to A is 4 notes and E to G is three notes so that's why the interval changes. like E to A is even if it's Eb to Ax(double sharp) which is as large as a minor sixth, its still a fourth. You probably know that, but I just wanted to be clear in case you were new.


i knew that but i was concentrating more in counting the half steps between intervals, and like 2 mins before you replied i discovered that.

thanks for the help
#5
Quote by no lolage
If you've got two enharmonic equavilents in a scale such as a sharpened 3rd or a flattened 4th you go for the one which hasnt been repeated. For example you'd say - 1, 2, 3, flat 4. Not 1, 2, 3, sharp 3. etc. Thats convention but obviously in some scales its unavoidable. For the chord usually you just take the 1st, 3rd and 5th note of the scale so just name the notes and intervals of the chord as you would the scale.

Right idea, poor example. There is a half step between the 3 and 4 to begin with so a sharp 3 is not enharmonic to a b4. A sharp 3 (augmented 3rd) is enharmonic to a 4 (perfect 4th).
Si