#1
Hey guys i was playing my guitar once and instead of playing D I played this

http://www.jguitar.com/chord.gif?define=x%2Cx%2C0%2C2%2C3%2C3&root=D&chord=Suspended+4th

I thought is sounded pretty cool playing a D to Dsus4 and fell in love with the sound.
I asked my guitar teacher about it and well hes the one who told me it was a "sus4" chord. I can see why it has a 4 cuz D-G is 4, But what does Sus stand for? Can this be applied to any chord? Is there any songs out there you guys can let me know of that use "sus4".
RAW ROCK KILLS!- ShowBread
Hello, My name is Armando and im your bunny
#3
Bob Dylan uses this a lot. Mr. Tambourine Man is a tune he uses sus 4 chords in.
12 fret fury
#5
Sus means suspended, because the 3rd is being replaced with a 2 or a 4, and yes, it can be done to any chord. It can be used in place of some other Major/minor chords as well
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#6
you play "the" four instead of "the" three.

War is over (or whatever it is called ) by Lennon.
#7
Also, suspended chords are not considered major or minor for the reason that you take out the 3rd note.
LIFE IS TOO SHORT NOT TO LET YOUR MIND SPREAD WINGS AND TAKE FLIGHT

Quote by KeepOnRotting
+Infinity. This dude knows good metal.
#8
Sweet child o mine has some sus chords...and some add chords as well i think
#9
Quote by LaGrange
Also, suspended chords are not considered major or minor for the reason that you take out the 3rd note.


so your saying it can be used like Power chords in the sense that it doesnt have a 3rd to define it major or minor?
RAW ROCK KILLS!- ShowBread
Hello, My name is Armando and im your bunny
#10
sus stands for suspended. You suspend the third for a fourth.

In a classical sense this means that you play a chord and hold over a note from the previous chord that acts as a fourth in the new chord and then resolve down a half step to the 3rd while the chord is sounding.

For example you might use G Dsus4 D
G is the "preperation" the G note is naturally in this triad. The Dsus4 is the suspension (there is no 3rd, no F#). Then the G resolves down to the 3rd the F# of the final D chord.

In contemporary settings many of the technicalities are ignored and it is simply a chord played with a fourth and no 3rd. In music today it does not need to be prepared or resolved in the traditional setting in order to be a suspension.

If you like that try Asus4 Am Asus2. These combinations are common in a lot of songs and sound really sweet.

Or try Dsus2 along with your D and Dsus4 also. Same idea but one is in A the other in D one is using a minor3rd and the other major3rd.

Good Luck

EDIT: PS in the classical sense of the term suspended you can suspend any note by holding over a note from the last chord and resolving down a semitone to the new chord tone.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 28, 2008,
#11
Quote by Esp_kill07
so your saying it can be used like Power chords in the sense that it doesnt have a 3rd to define it major or minor?


basically