#1
Can you guys suggest me a few really useful books
that talk over music theory, compostion, etc. ?

I'd really love if you can give the name of the book and author.
I need something to do when I'm bored, so why not read right?
Music theory books or guitar method books suggestions please.
#3
It's better to learn by doing. If you want to get a book like Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum to learn about counterpoint, then I would still recommend reading it with guitar in hand; so you can immediately hear what the book's talking about.
#4
Quote by blue_strat
It's better to learn by doing. If you want to get a book like Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum to learn about counterpoint, then I would still recommend reading it with guitar in hand; so you can immediately hear what the book's talking about.



I have to disagree with the statement above.

IF it were truly better to learn by first hand experience then people wouldn’t have books to read ( and LEARN ) from. We wouldn’t go to school, because who needs text-books when you can have REAL WORLD experience. Books Are important.


I don’t have any ideas, other than maybe a basic theory book. Just flip through a couple different *scales, soloing and Chord books at a guitar store sometime and pick one…Some are going to be better than others ----but something is better than nothing.

I really just wanted to correct that fallacy.
- to Make ourselves more than we are
#5
Quote by J0hnY
I have to disagree with the statement above.

IF it were truly better to learn by first hand experience then people wouldn’t have books to read ( and LEARN ) from. We wouldn’t go to school, because who needs text-books when you can have REAL WORLD experience. Books Are important.


I don’t have any ideas, other than maybe a basic theory book. Just flip through a couple different *scales, soloing and Chord books at a guitar store sometime and pick one…Some are going to be better than others ----but something is better than nothing.

I really just wanted to correct that fallacy.

Do you go to school, sit down and read the textbook, get up and go home?

Of course not. You're given exercises to go through and projects to test what you've learnt. If you're in a music class, you'll play an instrument. If you're in history, you may be given an essay to write about a subject.

My point is that just reading books won't get you very far.
#6
If ya really think about it, you have more than a simple book at your fingertips... The web. UG. Youtube. Google. These simple tools seem to contain more demo's, technique, video's and information than I could ever dream to locate in a deadprint-textbook.


-Slap...