#1
ok i have a couple of questions :


1-when writing a song do you stay in one key or you must play in different keys ?


2-when changing keys like now i know the minor scale in the key of A when you change the key does the pattern change or it stays the same ?


example:
now in the key of A its like this
E 5 78


do you play it like this lets say starting in 12th fret


E 12 14 15


i hoped everyone under stood sorry if its confusing
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#2
1 - typically, you stay in the same key for the entire song, unless theres a key change.
2 - if i understand you right, you keep the same pattern
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#3
1- it doesnt matter

2- scales are always based on the starting note and it is the intervals that defines them. so, if by the minor scale in the key of a, you mean f sharp minor, then the pattern changes but its kind of the same notes. i have no idea what you are on about when you go like this: "E 5 7 8"
but... basically get this out of it: scales are based on starting note and intervals between them, and dont feel like you have to follow a set of rules when playing. do what you think would be good, and listen to what you play and if it sounds good go for it and if not change it.
#4
Scales =/= Patterns

They are a set of notes and can be played anywhere they may lie on the fretboard.
#5
You must stay in one key the entire song, theres only two ways to change keys in a song if you are going to do it.

The first method is used more often. The major scale and the minor scale are the same scale, in the sense that they use the same notes, so A minor is also a C major. The reson that there is a diffrence in the use of the root note. If you are using the a minor you end on A if you are using a C major you end on C, also they way it easyer to tell wich to use is by looking at the cords, i'm not going to explane that, you can look on the internet and you will find alot of stuff on this.

The only other way to change keys during a song would be for you to change at the same time as the rest of the band. But this would sound like a whole new song, and i don't know of any songs that do this.

Now i think what your talking about is not switching keys, but infact switching modes. This is done almost all the time in almost every song, especally blues and jazz.

Go on the internet and look up scales and how their modes work, then look up how the modes relate to chords.

If you played
E 5 7 8

then played
E 12 14 15

You would of went from A minor to E minor
Last edited by Ganshar at Dec 28, 2008,
#9
14th fret is F#, there is no F# in C Major it would be in any key with an E F# and G. i would personally use G Major/E Minor because i am lazy.
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#10
Ganshar, your post is pretty much completely wrong. C major and a minor aren't "the same" and they aren't interchangeable. The example you showed doesn't illustrate changing scale or mode at all...modes don't even come into it. Your key and the scales you can use are dictated by your chord progression, not by the position you're playing or "the note you start from". Changing key is a common enough musical device, you don't have to stay in one key for a whole song at all, but if you want to change keys then you change the chords, not the lead part.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 28, 2008,
#11
Quote by steven seagull
Ganshar, your post is pretty much completely wrong. C major and a minor aren't "the same" and they aren't interchangeable. The example you showed doesn't illustrate changing scale or mode at all...modes don't even come into it. Your key and the scales you can use are dictated by your chord progression, not by the position you're playing or "the note you start from". Changing key is a common enough musical device, you don't have to stay in one key for a whole song at all, but if you want to change keys then you change the chords, not the lead part.


Yeah i worded that pretty wrong, I'm kinda loaded today. Your right though you can bridge it with the common chords.