#1
My current understanding of constructing major scales is that from your starting point, you have to use every letter until you get back to the one you started from. For instance, in someones sig ive seen the C# major scale:
C# D# E# F# G# A# B#

even though B# and E# are enharmonic to C and F, we name them like this.

Can there be double sharp notes?

D# major scale:

D# E# F## G# A# B# C##

similar situation on the G# and A# major scales. So what gives? Are the double sharps okay? Do you have to just go with Eb instead? How is this supposed to be handled?
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#3
Yes, double sharps are perfectly okay. You just play a full step up from the original note.
Quote by SynGates7X

you are indeed mr. awesome.

Quote by Duane_Allman
eckmann88 you sir are a god.

Quote by SavageNights
Oh, you're so damn shallow, eckmann88. They have nice boobs, don't they?

Quote by DraketheFake
good job eckman, seriously, that last one alone would give me an eternal erection!

Help
Space
#4
Technically, there isn't a key of D#, because double sharps aren't used in key signatures. you would have to call it Eb, which has 3 flats in the key signature.

EDIT: Same thing with G# major, and A# major. They don't have key signatures, so you'd have to call them Ab and Bb.
Neon Neon Neon Neon Neon Black


UG's #1 anti-active advocate

Gear:
Engl Powerball
Carvin DC727
Schecter C-1+
Line 6 Flextone 3
Line 6 M9
#5
Double sharps can be used but usually aren't practical in a key signature, for the sake of simplicity I'd stick with Eb.