#1
so the chords are : G Bm C D

i want to apply a minor pentatonic scale here. so which scale will be preferable here ? this could be a noob question and im a noob so don't get hard on me.
#3
Go with G minor pentatonic, that's what your progression resolves to....well, it resolves to G major, but a minor pentatonic scale over a major progression is a common enough device in rock and blues.
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#4
The chords clearly point to G Major. What you have there is 1-3-4-5 in the key of G major. Playing G minor pentatonic here will clash big time. Combining major and minor over a single chord progression works some places, but definately not here. G major and G major pentatonic are what you should use.
#5
E minor penatonic, it's the relative minor of G Major, which is what that chord progression is in. Trust me, it will sound good as long as you resolve around G's in the scale, and not E's.
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#7
e minor pentatonic, a dorian , b phrygian will all do fine, and they are all minor modes.

it all depends on how you wanna sound. e minor pentatonic will fit into the tonic, but g minor pentatonic will sound more bluesy, and will clash.
#10
Quote by Kartman
E minor penatonic, it's the relative minor of G Major, which is what that chord progression is in. Trust me, it will sound good as long as you resolve around G's in the scale, and not E's.

You can't "play E minor pentatonic" if your progression is in G....those notes are G major in that context and referring to them as something else is just overcomplicating the issue.
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#12
ive one more question, how can you guys understand what scale to apply ? and why should i use G on that progression ? why not Bm, C or D ?
#13
I know because first of all, the chords all belong to G major. Then, I realized that the last two chords are the IV and V of G major. Those two chords have a very strong resolution towards G major. This tells me without needing to hear the progression that it's in G major.


EDIT: You could use "B phrygian" "C lydian" and "D mixolydian" but that isn't correct because this progression doesn't resolve to B, C or D, it resolves to G. Also, it's over complicating it. This is a fairly simple and common major scale progression, bringing modes into it just over complicates the matter, especially when you're not even using a mode. That would just be jumping into the deep end of the pool with no floats.

Make sure you understand intervals, key sigs (what they are and how to calculate them) the major scale, how to build chords from each of it's degrees, whether these chords are major or minor and how they relate to each other. When you understand these things you'll be able to see in what key a certain progression is in.
Last edited by Confusius at Dec 29, 2008,
#14
Quote by Confusius
I know because first of all, the chords all belong to G major. Then, I realized that the last two chords are the IV and V of G major. Those two chords have a very strong resolution towards G major. This tells me without needing to hear the progression that it's in G major.


EDIT: You could use "B phrygian" "C lydian" and "D mixolydian" but that isn't correct because this progression doesn't resolve to B, C or D, it resolves to G. Also, it's over complicating it. This is a fairly simple and common major scale progression, bringing modes into it just over complicates the matter, especially when you're not even using a mode. That would just be jumping into the deep end of the pool with no floats.

Make sure you understand intervals, key sigs (what they are and how to calculate them) the major scale, how to build chords from each of it's degrees, whether these chords are major or minor and how they relate to each other. When you understand these things you'll be able to see in what key a certain progression is in.


you're great man . im learning theories these days like the intervals etc. thnx for your help though.
#15
Over and above the theory side of things I know that progression so I know the sound of it....Happy Hour by the Housemartins uses the same movement.

If used correctly G minor pentatonic over it will tend to sound bluesier/rockier and a little meaner, G major pentatonic will sound poppier and more upbeat, possibly kind of country
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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 29, 2008,