#1
Hey,

I have a problem when i try to bend. When i bend a string my fingers and the string that i'm bending always touch the strings above or below and this makes those strings sound as well. How do i stop this from happening. Has this happened to anyone else and if it has how did u stop this from happening?

Also i'm wondering some times i get tabs which tell me to bend and do a vibrato at the same time. Its notated like a note 2nd string with an arrow curving up with a 1 above it and above that is the curvy line telling me to do a vibrato. Could some1 plz tell me how to do this?

thanks
#2
When bending, try to keep the other strings over the fretboard. I never had any problems with this, but it might be your technique. Try to use your fingertip more when bending, to avoid the other string to touch the fretboard.
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#4
Quote by Freepower
You can use your first finger to touch the other strings to mute them - like a barre, but without any pressure, just touching the strings.


This.

I'd like to add, you just need to go very slowly without getting much noise (I recommend using max gain and quite a high volume so nothing gets past ur ear.

You also need to develop finger strength. This will come over time, and all those things + the acquired muscle memory will become 2nd nature.

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#5
Quote by Freepower
You can use your first finger to touch the other strings to mute them - like a barre, but without any pressure, just touching the strings.


x60 it's really just practice. Oh and the way you mute when bending depends a little on your string height. Also if you have a flat radius or a rounder one. Experementation is key here Though I will say that when your playing alone, epecially when bending the high E string a bit of noise from the B and G string is inevitable but shouldnt be audible in context. listen to some of the pro guys on youtube, and youll here they do this as well.
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#6
so what about the vibrato and bending at the same time thing? how do i do that? sorry but i didn't really understand chucklesmginty's answer.

Thanks
#7
Use your ears. Bend the note to the desired pitch; until your ears say it's certainly at the desired pitch after that holding the bend slightly move the string up and down, as to vary the pitch ever so slightly. It's hard at first, but after your fingers start getting stronger it'll be second nature. Just remember to use your ears at all times when bending and using vibrato.

P.S. It also might help to use fingers that aren't fretting a note to aid with the bend and vibrato as well. For instance if you're bending with your pinky or ring finger 'grab' the string with your middle finger and pointer finger as well to get a better grip on the strings.
#8
Quote by Aisten
so what about the vibrato and bending at the same time thing? how do i do that? sorry but i didn't really understand chucklesmginty's answer.

Thanks


Bend very slowly and vibrato very slowly. Make sure the sound is even.

This is just practice and you need to listen well. Also developing vibrato is random. Some have their "perfect" vibrato in 2 years some in 4 years.

If you develop muscles in ur fingers then it will go easier and you will have more control. Really just keep practising and it will come.

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#9
Quote by Aisten
Hey,

I have a problem when i try to bend. When i bend a string my fingers and the string that i'm bending always touch the strings above or below and this makes those strings sound as well. How do i stop this from happening. Has this happened to anyone else and if it has how did u stop this from happening?

Also i'm wondering some times i get tabs which tell me to bend and do a vibrato at the same time. Its notated like a note 2nd string with an arrow curving up with a 1 above it and above that is the curvy line telling me to do a vibrato. Could some1 plz tell me how to do this?

thanks


well thats pretty normal. you have to work on muting with your picking hand you get rid of the extra noise. it just comes with time really.

andbasically just bend up to a note, and then do smaller little dips down from that note and back up to it. you could also go a bit above the note as well. its really more of an ear thing than physical i think. practice by sliding up to the note you want to bend to, and put virbrato on that note. really know what that sounds like. then try to make that same sound when bending to that note. it just takes time and effort.
#10
Quote by Aisten
so what about the vibrato and bending at the same time thing? how do i do that? sorry but i didn't really understand chucklesmginty's answer.

Thanks

That's because his explanation is unclear. Forget the explanation regarding two strings. The notation you describe simply means bending the pitch one tone higher and applying vibrato. It is not easy to apply controlled vibrato once the finger is under muscular tension due to the bending action. The advice regarding slow deliberate action is probably soundest. At some stage you will have to get it up to performance tempos and this is a time when players sometimes encounter a 'barrier' difficult to break through. Sometimes relaxation and "letting it happen" (a mental trick) solves the problem, especially when adequate slow training has taken place.
#11
ok i understand that i should go slow but should the strings touch each other when your bending?

i found a way to stop th adjacent strings from sounding by having them tucked under th string im bending but the one above that still sounds mainly because i'm letting the strings come into contact with it but the song i was trying to learn said to bend that high.

so should the strings come into contact with eachother?

thanks
#12
I had to go to my guitar and do a few bends to see precisely what I was doing, because it's a little tricky to explain.

But, anyway, the bent string doesn't come into contact with the other strings. Like I said, it's a bit tricky to explain - but here goes. The string I'm bending is under my 2nd and 3rd fingers. As I push these fingers up towards me to bend the string, the fingers (not the string), bump into the next string (the adjacent lower pitched string) at a point a little bit closer to the nail and push it out of the way. The gap for me between the point on my fingers which is fretting the bent string, and the point on my fingertip which is pushing the other strings out of the way is between 1/8th and 1/16th of an inch (1.5 mm for metric peeps). While all of this is happening, my index finger is extended parallel with the fret board covering (making contact with but not pressing down) both the fretted string and the strings getting pushed out of the way in order to mute.

One thing - the action on your guitar (height of the strings) makes a big difference. If it is too high, your fingers may go under the adjacent strings rather than pushing them out of the way. This causes big problems, and I dont know how to fix that other than lowering your action.

On to bend vibrato. This is a very tricky technique, so be prepared to spend a fair bit of time. It takes quite a bit of strength and control, and a certain feel for it. It's also one of those techniques that you slave away w/o apparent results until one day it clicks for you. Start out like this (fret numbers are example, do it multiple positions). Pick the high E on the 2nd string (17th fret) without bending for a reference pitch. Drop down two frets and bend the 15th fret up to the pitch of the first note. Pick it again at the top of the bend to check that it's pitch matches the first note. If you have trouble nailing this consistently, don't worry about the bend vibrato yet. Just do this in various positions all over the fretboard until you have it down.

So if you do have it down. The next step towards getting the bend vibrato is to take your already bent note, and bend it a little sharper, then release it down to the pitch of the original bend. Once you've spent some time on this, start applying a slow steady rhythm to those additional amounts of bend. Then start messing around with different types of rhythms.

When this starts getting easier, the next step is to vibrato the E at the 17th fret without a bend, then drop down and bend the D up and vibrato the bend and try to get it to match how the first note sounds. It may help to pre-bend the D before applying the vibrato at first. The last step is being able to do this consistently, and with lots of different kinds of vibrato.

Good luck! It's a lot of work, but a really key skill to be working on.
Last edited by se012101 at Jan 1, 2009,