#1
okay
ive been teaching 2 nine year old boys how to play guitar for about 2 months now
i am trying to teach them chords but they think they are too boring
is their anything i can do/say to help them with that?

and
does anybody have any good tips for me since they are so young..?
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#2
Teach them chords through playing songs they like ?
And make them a colourful poster of the diagrams of the chords
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#3
Yeah, I agree. It's good to teach them chords and all the basicis and such. But you need to also let them have some fun. Like, if there is a specific song they really like, teach them how to play that using those chords you are teaching them. That's just my input.
Last edited by tele432 at Dec 29, 2008,
#4
Well, chords ARE dead boring unless one also sings or engages in ensemble activity. Teach them to read music and open the world of melody up for them. They sound like ideal candidates.
If you can't do that send them to a professional (preferably qualified) teacher.
#5
Quote by R.Christie
If you can't do that send them to a professional (preferably qualified) teacher.

Unless the TS's idea is to make money, then that's probably not a good idea. Kinda selfish and greedy I know but....
#6
^

More to the point, teach them the basics of whatever songs or styles they like. Do they like the Chilli Peppers or Fall Out Boy? Because they're so young, you need to keep things lively and fun while staying in control, which is pretty tricky.
#7
Quote by Freepower
^

More to the point, teach them the basics of whatever songs or styles they like. Do they like the Chilli Peppers or Fall Out Boy? Because they're so young, you need to keep things lively and fun while staying in control, which is pretty tricky.


One ought to be careful here. Making lessons fun and lively is a different issue to incorporating popular repertiore. But being a bit "old school" by inclination I am uncomfortable with letting pupils largely dictate the relevance and content of lessons. They don't have the 20, 30 or even 40 year overview that a teacher has. They have little or no idea of where the music they select stands in the scale of their own musical and technical development. Allowing pupils mostly call the shots on content also limits scope of musical style they are exposed to. There is a risk that search (never-ending) for the (ever-changing) popular relevance of a musical style can take greater priority over other aspects of an ordered musical education. I could go on as there is more to consider besides. I often find that amateur teachers place too high a priority on this popular "relevance", perhaps because they are unaware of the other aspects.


My experience is that young pupils (under say 12 or 13 yrs) are highly open to all manner of repertoire and there is a golden window of opportunity for a teacher to exploit this ability at those ages where a pupil is beyond infancy but not yet in the grip of adolescent peer-pressure and/or marketeers. Thankfully they bring far fewer preconceptions, less fashion and prejudicial attitudes to bear on musical taste. Most are happy with the learning and music making process in itself and not overly concerned with musical style, this ia an age group where Ode to Joy has as much appeal as Smoke on the Water.

This is not to ignore current popular fashion and pupil requests completely; and the whole picture dramatically changes for adolescents.
#9
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fw2SXcE32o8

Show them this video. I know for a fact following Larry's lessons produces master guitarists.
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