#1
Could someone please tell me what I can play in over the chord progression
G C D#, F A# D, D# G# C, D G B
and how you exactly figure it out? I tried writing out the notes and seeing if they fit any mode progressions, but I could not fit it to any one mode; I wouldn't be surprised if I made a small mistake when writing out the notes.
Thanks for the help!
#2
is it all major chords, or are some minor?
but yeah, presuming their all major id say...G and C can be C major, D# Major for the D# chord, F major, A# Major, D Major, D# Major, E major for D# and G#, C major for the C Chord, then D Major, then G Major.
Basically, unless some are minor (which would make loads more sense....), you should just play from the notes that compromise each chord instead of bothering with scales, as youd have to modulate every chord (though you should know what non-chord tones are consonant and which ones are not).
Sorry I could'nt be more helpful.
#3
G C Eb, F Bb D, Eb Ab C, D G B. Now doesn't that look better? C natural minor would seem to work very well. Of course over that finaly G major chord you might want to play a C harmonic minor just so that you can resolve nice and smoothly back to C minor if you cycle the progression.
#4
Well, if you replace all sharps in your progression into flats, you get G, C, Eb, F, Bb, D, Eb, Ab, D, G, B. And it's a diatonic progression in C minor, exept for one chord - B, which could work for modulation purposes. So you could play C minor scale across all this progression, exept the B chord, on which you could play B major or B lydian.

But all this would work only if you're playing a power chord progression, or if you didn't write all the minor chord symbols, because all your chords written here are major. And if you really play only major chords then you need to play a different scale on each chord. That would be G ionian, C ionian, D# ionian, etc.
Last edited by UNIe at Dec 29, 2008,
#5
Quote by UNIe
Well, if you replace all sharps in your progression into flats, you get G, C, Eb, F, Bb, D, Eb, Ab, D, G, B. And it's a diatonic progression in C minor, exept for one chord - B, which could work for modulation purposes. So you could play C minor scale across all this progression, exept the B chord, on which you could play B major.

But all this would work only if you're playing a power chord progression, because all your chords written here are major. And if you really play only major chords then you need to play a different scale on each chord. That would be G ionian, C ionian, D# ionian, etc.


an E note is not in the key of Cminor thus not diatonic.

Anyways I maybe come back to this 1 tomorrow, I gotta play over the progression to see what works nicely.

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#7
Uh, people, please, don't over complicate matters. C natural minor fits perfectly well for the most part and C harmonic minor over that towering dominant G major chord should see him firmly equipped to create some great music.
#8
Quote by UNIe
And where do you see an E chord in this progression?


The C chord has the notes: C, E and G

C minor has C, Eb, G

Look better, it's not that hard.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#9
Quote by MisquotedTeabag
Uh, people, please, don't over complicate matters. C natural minor fits perfectly well for the most part and C harmonic minor over that towering dominant G major chord should see him firmly equipped to create some great music.


Well, yes. But if he wants to know why we suggested C minor, explanation is always helpful
By the way, why does nobody say anything about the B chord? It's the one that would ruin everything if you didn't change the scale on it.
#11
What bloody B chord? It's a G Major. A lovely dominant, candential, functional G major chord that resolves ever so smoothly to the tonic C minor! Thus the need for that wonderful scale the Rennaissance composer came up that we refer to as the Harmonic minor scale or in this case C harmonic minor....Is nobody reading my comments? =(
#12
Quote by UNIe
And I've said that it's not a diatonic progression if all the chords he played were major. Look better ;]


I don't see any C5 G5 or any *5.

And to misquoted ^^

The first 2 chords are a V - I in C Major.

You'd be booed off the stage after the first 2 chords if you played Cminor over those, Unless you have a very good stage outfit

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#13
Oh golly gee. Darren, you are an expert theoretician but you certainly do need a prescription for a new pair of glasses. Please notice the peculiarly unobtrusive comma that invades the space between every 3 notes in the original posters question...He's simply depicting 3 chords in a somewhat unique way...


[EDIT]

4 chords, not 3. =)
#14
Quote by MisquotedTeabag
Oh golly gee. Darren, you are an expert theoretician but you certainly do need a prescription for a new pair of glasses. Please notice the peculiarly unobtrusive comma that invades the space between every 3 notes in the original posters question...He's simply depicting 3 chords in a somewhat unique way...


[EDIT]

4 chords, not 3. =)



Oh, I didn't saw.

Lol I don't need glasses, I just need coffee, I didn't saw his somewhat weird style, it's almost a puzzle.

I was dazzled at all the "weird" replies; Was like wtf are they on about lol.

My Apologies

To TS;

For the first 2 (or 3) chords use C minor, for the last 2 chords C Harmonic minor.

If you change the last chord to minor instead of major, then C minor would work over everything.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#15
Yes, but don't change it to g minor, G major yields a much more satisfactory resolution of the leading note to the tonic.

And Darren, a nice glass of iced coffee works good as any glass for your eyes. And believe me, I was quite perplexed myself at how perplexed everyone else was. =)
#16
Quote by MisquotedTeabag
Yes, but don't change it to g minor, G major yields a much more satisfactory resolution of the leading note to the tonic.

And Darren, a nice glass of iced coffee works good as any glass for your eyes. And believe me, I was quite perplexed myself at how perplexed everyone else was. =)



roflz it's 12 midnight going to bed in a sec no coffee for meee.

Massive communication fail in this thread epicly lol.

I agree don't change the chord. But how this guy writes chords I didn't want to overcomplicate it for him.

BTW I actually am novice theory. I started with theory only since august. I'm a "play-by-ear" kind of musician or however u call it, just wanted to see how it all translates in theory and expand my understanding of western music.

I also started learning/reading sheet music as of 1/2 weeks ago.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#17
It's 4 am here. Too much coffee for me a few hours ago. And self proclaimed novice or other wise your lessons on your sig were very informative and your example improvisations were certainly a testament to how good you put theory to music. I don't mean to sound patronizing, I'm just saying, you make a lot of good points.


Anyway, good night to you and I'm sure any lose ends on this thread have been tied together.
#18
Quote by MisquotedTeabag
Oh golly gee. Darren, you are an expert theoretician but you certainly do need a prescription for a new pair of glasses. Please notice the peculiarly unobtrusive comma that invades the space between every 3 notes in the original posters question...He's simply depicting 3 chords in a somewhat unique way...


[EDIT]

4 chords, not 3. =)


Ok, NOW I see it
Ok, then forget about everything I said in earlier posts. But that's a confusing way to write chords like that.

So the chords then are: Cm, Bb/F, Ab/Eb, G.

Yeah, C minor all the way and C harmonic minor over G ;]
Also, you could imply Bb major scale over Bb, Ab major over Ab and G major on the G.
#19
Quote by UNIe
Ok, NOW I see it
Ok, then forget about everything I said in earlier posts. But that's a confusing way to write chords like that.

So the chords then are: Cm, Bb/F, Ab/Eb, G.

Yeah, C minor all the way and C harmonic minor over G ;]
Also, you could imply Bb major scale over Bb, Ab major over Ab and G major on the G.


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and to misquote gnite

Theory was easy, cause I listen very deep too music. Not trying to sound like some divine god or w/e, but I do have a connection, and I was aware of modal sounds before I even knew their names simply because modal sounds appealed to me aurally for as long as I can remember.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 29, 2008,
#20
TS, if you approach it the way that I have, with all chords major (and a somewhat odd rhythm.. timing is NOT 1 chord each measure the way I'm doing it), I don't know how you would go about playing over something like this. I'm playing it kind of weird, though, and I really don't know that anyone would EVER approach it this way. If it were done the way that I'm approaching it, I really don't know how you'd do it, unless you were playing over each chord, and not just from one scale. You'd get lost otherwise. I'll see about recording the rhythm that I'm playing, though, just to give everyone an idea of why it'd be so difficult the way that I'm playing this (which is completely wrong, I can just say right now).
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#21
Quote by Page&HammettFan
TS, if you approach it the way that I have, with all chords major (and a somewhat odd rhythm.. timing is NOT 1 chord each measure the way I'm doing it), I don't know how you would go about playing over something like this. I'm playing it kind of weird, though, and I really don't know that anyone would EVER approach it this way. If it were done the way that I'm approaching it, I really don't know how you'd do it, unless you were playing over each chord, and not just from one scale. You'd get lost otherwise. I'll see about recording the rhythm that I'm playing, though, just to give everyone an idea of why it'd be so difficult the way that I'm playing this (which is completely wrong, I can just say right now).


I think you have the same problem I had. It's not 12 chords it's just 4 chords. He wrote out the notes of each chord separated by the ','.

The chords are: Cm, Bb, Ab, G.

Anyways I recorded an improvisation over said progression using the Cmin scale and Harmonic minor. (I'm really following the chords, but I use notes of those scales, with also a few blues notes thrown in)

IT's in my Profile


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#22
Inspired by xxdarrenxx's last comment, I also made a recording on this wonderful chord progression (it's also in my profile). For it to be more interesting, I made it in 3/4 meter and in an eastern kinda style. I also changed the bass line here and there so that the progression would get a bit more colors. I hope you get some ideas on improvising from it. Have fun with your playing ;]
#23
I really guessed that it wasn't all majors like I was playing it, but I didn't even want to bother changing everything, because I knew looking at all of the replies that someone had already done all of that and there was absolutely no need for me to do it. I added a few chords on the end of it, too, though, and I think that what I did with it was very interesting. I'll post it later on tonight, but with not solo. I don't wanna attempt to outline those chord changes Leave that to the jazz masters. Something about the way I played it sounds pretty familiar, though.
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