#1
I once read that Blues Boy uses a very heavy classical style vibrato (lateral action, where the pitch swings above and below the fretted note) , using the whole arm as opposed to a typical electric (across/along the fret) technique.
Any comments/ confirmation? I figure the standard technique can also be exaggerated to involve the whole arm as well.
#2
I think he does both and/or a combination of both classical and "Rock" vibrato.

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#3
The famous BB vibrato is a very narrow rock vibrato, no lateral movement at all, lots of very fast arm rotation channeled to the string through the first finger. I hate it.

Although I believe he uses a classical vibrato elsewhere.
#4
Quote by Freepower
The famous BB vibrato is a very narrow rock vibrato, no lateral movement at all, lots of very fast arm rotation channeled to the string through the first finger. I hate it.


Do you dislike the mechanics of the technique or the musical result? and why? - just curious.
#5
The musical result, to me it sounds weak and sharp. I understand what he was going for and I "get" the sound, but it's just the complete opposite of what I like vibrato-wise (I prefer more subtle or more outrageous, but definately more distinctly controlled).

Physically I have no problem with the way BB does it, but it's one of those things that someone could mistake for an excuse to just rotate their arm "as quick as possible" (quoted from BB) - without really listening to their own vibrato. Learning to hear your vibrato is so important and tbh, one of my greatest weaknesses as a player - BB hears his, and I have no complaints on that account.

ED: by the way, my info on the technique and it's mechanics comes from an old interview he had for guitar.com, which has unfortunately completely restructured itself since then and the interviews have gone. I actually tried to find it for quite some time before my original post, but no luck.
#6
Quote by Freepower
The musical result, to me it sounds weak and sharp. I understand what he was going for and I "get" the sound, but it's just the complete opposite of what I like vibrato-wise (I prefer more subtle or more outrageous, but definately more distinctly controlled).

Physically I have no problem with the way BB does it, but it's one of those things that someone could mistake for an excuse to just rotate their arm "as quick as possible" (quoted from BB) - without really listening to their own vibrato. Learning to hear your vibrato is so important and tbh, one of my greatest weaknesses as a player - BB hears his, and I have no complaints on that account.

ED: by the way, my info on the technique and it's mechanics comes from an old interview he had for guitar.com, which has unfortunately completely restructured itself since then and the interviews have gone. I actually tried to find it for quite some time before my original post, but no luck.

I'm trying to figure out the "rotation" aspect here, classical vibrato "rocks' but doesn't rotate. I assume it is wrist rotation you are talking about? (actually entire forearm, the wrist joint doesn't rotate, it only hinges). I also assume finger movement, aside from movement resulting from the arm/wrist action, doesn't form part of the technique. The result must then be highly dependant upon how, and on what angle (with respect to the line of the fingerboard), the hand is presented to the neck. If the starting point of the knuckles are parallel (as for chromatic scales) the rotation effect is different to the effect resulting from starting by fretting the note with the knuckles at an angle to the neck. From memory King doesn't adopt the parallel presentation.
#7
You are entirely right, let me see if I can find a good example -

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ny5ajCn0xw

If you go to about 1:39 in that video you can see the vibrato mechanism from an instructive angle. I hadn't been sure about this before, but notice that that not even the thumb is in contact with the guitar for this vibrato.

I actually quite dug the vibrato in this video, might learn it as a kind of "sweet" alternative to my rock vibrato...
#8
Thanks for that, cleared a few things up. Loved how his amp was set up, just on the cusp, sounded very Dumble like.
#10
Quote by Freepower
Those are those supersweet blues amps? I believe I was recently talking to a chap who found a amp building kit that provided a fairly similar tone...

Check out Larry Carlton, Robbin Ford, SRV. for a range of dumble sounds, I think of them as more jazz/rock fusion orientated but maybe 'blues" is good adjective.
Howard (Alexander) Dumble = tone genius. Same goes for Ken Fisher.

ED: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=cOeB4oANTVg
Last edited by R.Christie at Dec 31, 2008,