#1
It's obvious that you can play in E minor key this chords:

Em7 Am7 Bm7

But how do I know what 6 chords sound good. G6 sounds amazing in such progression
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
Quote by 08L1V10N
It's obvious that you can play in E minor key this chords:

Em7 Am7 Bm7

But how do I know what 6 chords sound good. G6 sounds amazing in such progression
We're in E minor, right? Not G major?
I'll also assume you're talking about maj6 chords, not a chord in it's first inversion (sometimes called a "sixth" chord).

First off, don't use a Bm7 in an Eminor progression if you plan to use it to resolve to Em (so no Bm7-Em movements). Also, don't resolve on 7th chords (of any quality or type), it doesn't produce a very nice resolution.
Use a B7 instead of a Bm7. It's more common to see a B7 than a Bm7 in an Eminor progression.

Also, avoid III chords in minor keys. You wouldn't want to accidentally resolve on a III chord, else you'll lose your minor tonality and your progression will become a major progression. So no G6's in minor progressions, Gmaj is the III chord of Eminor.

BTW, I generally use minor sixth chords on the second degree (iiadd6). I use these chords (F#m6 in E minor) to resolve downwards to the I or i chords (Em or Emaj). This makes a sort of dominant chord (as it contains all the right notes that cause resolution).

I don't think I've ever seen a xmaj6 chord in a minor progression. It doesn't seem to fit. Generally I've seen them used in major keys on the I chords or IV chords.

If you knew voice-leading and counterpoint you could probably fit a maj6 chord anywhere
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Dec 30, 2008,
#4
Quote by 08L1V10N
It's obvious that you can play in E minor key this chords:

Em7 Am7 Bm7

But how do I know what 6 chords sound good. G6 sounds amazing in such progression

Well, take any chord in the progression and instead of m7 make it a m6 instead.

You know your chord formulas and voicings right? So just experiment with them at different points on the fretboard.

If you're talking major 6 chords, then Gmaj6, Cmaj6 and Dmaj6 would be your options.

Use your ear, 6 chords are very common in Jazz, so it's sometimes difficult to get them sounding good in general rock type progressions.
#5
G6 contains the same notes as Emi7 ... used correctly it will work very nice in a minor progression...experiment with inversions it will produce some very nice and surprising results...

play well

wolf
#6
What kind of progression do actually sounds good in minor?

i-?-?-i

I only know major ones
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#8
Quote by 08L1V10N
What kind of progression do actually sounds good in minor?

i-?-?-i

I only know major ones
i - iv - V - i
i - bVII - bVI - V - i (I don't really like this one, but it's suprisingly common)
i- V - i (simple and effective)
i - bVI - V - i
i - ii - V- i

Then you could also sub out all the V's for vii0 (full diminished chords). THis doesn't always work btw.
So:
i - ii - V - i becomes: i - ii - vii0 - i

Or you could sub in a tritone substitution. Not the best resolution and doesn't always work.

In the end it's just a matter of finding different predominant chords and sticking them in between an i (or I) chord and a dominant chord (either V, V7, vii0, bII7 or iiadd6) and then resolving back to the i chord.

You could also add some chromatic movements (usually with the help of tritone subs) and use voiceleading to find some non-diatonic chords or whatever.

If you really suck at creativity, just copy someone elses progression. No shame in doing this, the song "I've got rhthym" has had it's progression used by every well known jazz musician.
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#9
Quote by demonofthenight
We're in E minor, right? Not G major?
I'll also assume you're talking about maj6 chords, not a chord in it's first inversion (sometimes called a "sixth" chord).

First off, don't use a Bm7 in an Eminor progression if you plan to use it to resolve to Em (so no Bm7-Em movements). Also, don't resolve on 7th chords (of any quality or type), it doesn't produce a very nice resolution.
Use a B7 instead of a Bm7. It's more common to see a B7 than a Bm7 in an Eminor progression.

Also, avoid III chords in minor keys. You wouldn't want to accidentally resolve on a III chord, else you'll lose your minor tonality and your progression will become a major progression. So no G6's in minor progressions, Gmaj is the III chord of Eminor.

BTW, I generally use minor sixth chords on the second degree (iiadd6). I use these chords (F#m6 in E minor) to resolve downwards to the I or i chords (Em or Emaj). This makes a sort of dominant chord (as it contains all the right notes that cause resolution).

I don't think I've ever seen a xmaj6 chord in a minor progression. It doesn't seem to fit. Generally I've seen them used in major keys on the I chords or IV chords.

If you knew voice-leading and counterpoint you could probably fit a maj6 chord anywhere


dont resolve to 7th chords - lmao
dont use III in a minor progression - LMAO
theres nothing wrong with using a minor v chord

looks like you read a few things on baroque harmony and think they are universal rules for writing music. The guy didn't even mention a style he wanted and you are giving him suggestions that are only relevant to certain styles.
#10
Quote by princess piggy
dont resolve to 7th chords - lmao
dont use III in a minor progression - LMAO
theres nothing wrong with using a minor v chord

looks like you read a few things on baroque harmony and think they are universal rules for writing music. The guy didn't even mention a style he wanted and you are giving him suggestions that are only relevant to certain styles.
Haha, baroque? Try rennaisance. The whole minor v thing ended when the major/minor systems of tonality came in.

And yes, I'm going to suggest a modern western style of music. Because I highly doubt he want's to write ethnic music or archaic music. Actually, if I had to guess, he's writing rock music.

And yes, III and iii chords are generally avoided in progressions due to being weak.

And yes, don't resolve on 7th chords. Inside a major seventh there's a leading tone which wants to move. Inside a minor seventh theres a minor seventh interval to the root, which doesn't establish tonality very well. Test it yourself. First resolve on a seventh chord, then resolve on a straight triad.
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#11
the things you are describing were developed moreso in the baroque period and you are using that ideal of harmony which doesnt apply to many genres. You dont have any idea what "modern western music" is if you are saying these things. many things that you consider "archaic" are very commonly used in modern music. Don't resolve on 7ths.. lmao have you heard of jazz?

its pretty cute you are trying to play the role of mr.bigshot theory professor but maybe you should take a few classes beyond intro harmony because you have no idea what "modern music" is. cheers you goober
#12
Quote by princess piggy
the things you are describing were developed moreso in the baroque period and you are using that ideal of harmony which doesnt apply to many genres. You dont have any idea what "modern western music" is if you are saying these things. many things that you consider "archaic" are very commonly used in modern music. Don't resolve on 7ths.. lmao have you heard of jazz?
Yes, I've actually played real jazz in a real band, have you?
I've never thought many jazz songs resolve too well. Jazz is a bad example as those guys would finish songs on altered dominants and other weird things.
Sevenths just don't sound "resolved." Play it yourself.
Quote by princess piggy
its pretty cute you are trying to play the role of mr.bigshot theory professor but maybe you should take a few classes beyond intro harmony because you have no idea what "modern music" is. cheers you goober
It's cute that someone with a little girly name, who just signed up, who uses little girly insults like goober believes that she's the all authority on music. In all honestly, how old are you?
I'm trying my hardest to help. You're trying your hardest to troll. See a difference?
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#13
There's nothing wrong with iii(or v) chords, they are in fact pretty popular. There are also III chords that don't resolve to the vi in common mainstream Western music. I cite Over The Rainbow as an example of the former and Santeria by Sublime for the later.

TS, if you're trying to find out which chords "sound good" in a key, try figuring out what chords are made of. If you knew a 6th chord was made of the root, major third, fifth, and major sixth, then what you could do is simply take each note of the key and figure which note in the key each set of that intervals fits in the scale. For the sake of ease, the 6th chords you "can" use in E minor are G6, C6, and D6.
#14
it doesnt "resolve well" in the ideals of baroque harmony and theres no chance in freaking hell that hes writing in that style and considering practically all modern music doesnt "resolve well" in that regard its really stupid to tell him outright to follow rules which don't result in anything anyone who isn't a retard would call "modern"

also im not a freaking girl mate
Last edited by princess piggy at Dec 31, 2008,
#15
@demonofthenight

Em7-Am7-Bm7-Em7 resolves just fine.. Now I agree with you that B7(b9) would have a better resolution. However, it really depends on the chord progression if you'd want to use that substitution.

The current progression flows nicely and resolves well. If you'd have something like F#m7b5 - Bm7 - Em7, then I'd agree that you'd preferably want to substitute the Bm7 with the B7b9 (sounds nicer IMO, but then again, depends on your own preference. Bm7 itself resolves well enough to Em7).
#16
should in minor the V be v? Am Bdim C Dm Em F G
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#17
^ In natural minor/aeolian, yes, but not in harmonic minor, the harmonic minor specifically being used for harmonies.
#18
So in A harmonic minor this is the i - iv - V - i progression:

Am - Dm - E - Am
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#20
Well, the same way you find out what 7th chords are in a key, you can find out what 6th chords are in a key. If you can do A, you can do B, and if you can't do A then you need to learn to do it.