#1
I'm new to music theory, but I've been writing music, both for a band and to help me learn this stuff quickly.

I've written a song in F# minor ( i think anyway )

And it sounds a lot like "In This River", which doesn't seem to be. Seems like a dumb question, but why does it sound so similar?
Mine: F#m, D, A, Em

Zakk Wylde's: Em C G D
And what key would "In This River" be in?
#2
hint: move your all your chords down two half steps and you might see where the resemblance comes from
#4
Quote by seljer
hint: move your all your chords down two half steps and you might see where the resemblance comes from


This is true.

If your song is in F#m, I would venture a guess that the other is in Em.
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#5
Quote by seljer
hint: move your all your chords down two half steps and you might see where the resemblance comes from

yep. yours is a VI IV I V progresion in the key of A while Zakks is the same in the key of G.
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#7
yeah it's because they're both i-VI-III-VII progressions, its just that yours is in F# minor and "In This River" is in E minor. Also, yours wouldn't really be in F# minor because the G in the Em chord at the end is out of key (F# minor is F# G# A B C# D E). If it sounds good keep it that way but I'm just letting you know.

edit: don't worry about copyright infringement or whatever, as long as your melodies aren't the same there's no way you can get in trouble because you can't copyright a chord progression, there are only so many commonly used ones, for example "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", "25 or 6 to 4", "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" and "Brain Stew" all have the same progression, but each is a unique song. Plus, yours is in a different key, so you're in the clear.
Last edited by gbdp54 at Dec 30, 2008,
#8
Quote by TK1
yep. yours is a VI IV I V progresion in the key of A while Zakks is the same in the key of G.


To which the relative minor in those keys would be F#m and Em.
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#9
Quote by gbdp54
yeah it's because they're both i-VI-III-VII progressions, its just that yours is in F# minor and "In This River" is in E minor. Also, yours wouldn't really be in F# minor because the G in the Em chord at the end is out of key (F# minor is F# G# A B C# D E). If it sounds good keep it that way but I'm just letting you know.

edit: don't worry about copyright infringement or whatever, as long as your melodies aren't the same there's no way you can get in trouble because you can't copyright a chord progression, there are only so many commonly used ones, for example "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", "25 or 6 to 4", "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" and "Brain Stew" all have the same progression, but each is a unique song. Plus, yours is in a different key, so you're in the clear.

sarcasm meter, but i appreciate the helpfulness!

Also, it was just E, not Em, i made a typo.
#12
Actually, a VERY common example of a song in F# minor is "Crazy Train" by Ozzy Osbourne. Listen to the chord progressions in the song, and it will help you compose songs in that key signature.