#1
I'm good with playing odd chords like Suspended, Augmented, Diminished, 6/9 etc.

BUt I'm currently writing an indian piece but I have no idea what type of chords gop along with Eastern Music. Can anyone help?
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#2
im no expert on the subject but I'm pretty sure they don't play many chords, its mostly like droning basslines. getting that sound has a lot to do with timbre of indian instruments and semitonal inflections.

like in these videos its mostly just a droning bassline with melody on top

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=7QuDEx3_Ygo
http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=LzN2gUGYUGc

it also sounds like there are some sharp 11 chords in the second one
#3
They also use a microtonal system, unlike Western music.
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#4
I'll look into the song Genocide by Steve Vai. I remember in the backgroud it has some really foreign sounding chords now that I think about it.
Guitars:
Schecter C1 Classic
Schecter C1-FR
Dean DW8 Backwoods 6-String Banjitar
Esteban Midnight Legacy [Its now a Fretless]
Luna Muse 12-String
Takamine Jasmine

Bass:
Dean Playmate

Amps:
Roland Cube 20-x
Traynor DynaGain 30R
Traynor Custom Valve 80
#5
Best guess is to read into some tradition Indian music. I'd find a translation of the Rigveda, an old Indian hymnal. Otherwise, I'd say finding a precise theory is beyond me. It'd be a great study for an ethnomusicologist, so try looking one major professors up in your area if you live near any colleges.
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#6
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindustani_classical_music
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnatic_Music

Depends what you are trying to play...

If you find hindustani hard to understand, maybe this helps a little although maybe not that much (regarding composition, etc)

http://theory.tifr.res.in/~mukhi/Music/music.html


For Carnatic music (since I can't find any site for the moment) try googling "sruti" and maybe you'll find something...
(also search "raga" and "tala")


I don't know about chords or even if they have them so I can't answer that..
#7
I'm gonna go ahead and assume that rather than playing actual Indian music, you want to play something that "sounds Indian", in which case, armed with some ear training and an understanding of theory, you should be able to listen to something "Indian-sounding" and have a rough idea of what to do. For the sake of ease, a good place to start might be the Harmonic Minor scale and MAYBE some of its modes, the first I'd suggest being Phrygian Dominant.

And like someone said, it's not really about chords and harmony so much.
#8
Classical Indian music does not use western scales. They have a system similar to scales though, they're called the 'raga.' There are thousands of them, each with a different character. They're what make normal western chords sound Indian, so get to know them.
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#9
Quote by UltraVai445

BUt I'm currently writing an indian piece but I have no idea what type of chords gop along with Eastern Music. Can anyone help?


You just don't know the most BASIC part of Indian Music.

They don't use chords. The two types of Indian music, Karnatak and Hindusthani are based only on melody. So they NEVER use different notes at the same time.


EDIT: Back to the topic, if you need some help with Indian music I can help you 'cos I've studied it. Give some kind of a description, like what notes you use(the key)...
Last edited by YA89 at Dec 31, 2008,