#1
Pointless thread really, but I just need some confirmation on something.

Listening to this song, the Irish sounding riff at the beginning, I was counting it and it sounds to me like 9/8. What do you think?

If it is, would I be correct in saying that it's Compound Triple Time, derived from a 3/4 with a dotted crotchet as the beat unit?

Something else, totally unrelated, I recently came up with two riffs.

One in 5/4, and one in 7/8. It's actually kinda cool, the "one" beat in both riffs re-sync every 3 bars... I think. Where your help comes in is, is there a drum time sig could I use which would land on the "one" every 3 bars, that's not 5/4 or 7/8?

Thanx,
M
#2
I haven't heard the song, but you're correct in thinking 9/8 is compound time derived from 3/4.

As to the second question, I don't quite understand what you're trying to say.
#3
Quote by michal23
As to the second question, I don't quite understand what you're trying to say.

Neither do I lol! I'm experimenting with poly's. Thanx for the confirmation on the first one though. The song is from Professor Satchafunkilus and the Musteion of Rock.
#4
On the 2nd question.

They won't line up after 3 bars unless they are different tempo's.

As for linking up every 3 bars, you'll still need a time signature.

you can do like 3/4 and 7/8 through each other.

Something like this;

D|---2-3-5-3-2-----3-5-7-5-3-----5-7-8-7-5---|--------
A|-3-----------3/5-----------5/6-----------6-|/8~-----
E|-------------------------------------------|--------
   1             2             3               1   

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 31, 2008,
#5
Wouldn't the 7th eighth note of the 7/8 land on the 1st eighth of the 3/4 in the 2nd bar though? Cuz a 3/4 has 6 eighth notes right?

Are you playing those at the same tempo though?
#6
^No, I don't think so.

If you're doing polyrhthyms I think (I'm not too good at polys, truth be told) you'd want to keep the barring the same, otherwise you won't get a poly.

I'm not sure if polys work in such a way that you do what you're thinking. I think it's just a matter of beating it out like this this:


7/8 ||0| | | | |o| | | | |o| | | | |0| | | | |o| | | | |o| | | | |0| | | | |o| | | | ||
5/4 ||0| | | | | | | |o| | | | | | | |0| | | | | | | |o| | | | | | | |o| | | | | | | ||

A space denotes a non-stressed beat. A 0 denotes a strong stressed beat. A o weak stressed beat. Keeping in mind there's a choice with which beats you stress in 7/8 and 5/4.

Every beat is an eight beat, as we're in X/8 time (what's the actual term for that?).

If you wanted to call that one time signature, I'd call it 35/8 (there are 35 beats in total). The way I got this was by finding the lowest common denominator between 7 and 5, which (for you who failed simple maths) you can usually find by multiplying each number together.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
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#7
Quote by mdc
Wouldn't the 7th eighth note of the 7/8 land on the 1st eighth of the 3/4 in the 2nd bar though? Cuz a 3/4 has 6 eighth notes right?

Are you playing those at the same tempo though?


It's really just Math.

3/4 = 6/8

2 bars of 6/8 = 12/8 (12 8th notes)

2 bars of 7/8 = 14/8 (14 8th notes)


My example is a polyrhythm. There are 7 notes between each beat.

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#8
Thanx guys, I'm no bgc but my maths is actually pretty good since I'm doing structural engineering! Cut me some slack, I did come up with this idea at 4am lol!

Having looked at it again, the 1 beats line up after every 10 bars of 7/8, or if you want look at it from the other signature, 7 bars of 5/4.

The hardest thing about it, is maintaining good time when playing the 7/8 single note riff over the 5/4 rhythm guitar.

Anyways it was just an experiment for me really, since I never work with polyrhythms. *Goes listens to Dream Theatre*.