#1
ok. back story.

ive had this hudson electro-acoustic for probably about 3 years now. to be totally honest, ive always been more of an electric player so its not got constant use, but every now and then ive brought it out when ive felt the need.

to cut a long story short, ive always felt like the strings at the body end are a little too far from the fretboard, and every now and then if i bend a high note my finger ends up sliding under the string next to it, which to me seems like its not normal. i think thats also one of the reasons i havent played it so much, because it feels laittle uncomforatble.

i finally took the thing into a guitar shop today and the guy there adjusted the truss rod (he agreed with me that they were very far away from the fretboard, and this was probably just as a result of not being adjusted in three years, possibly also to do with string gauges, etc) as far as he was able to. the result is that the strings are marginally closer to the neck but still not comfortable.

i have nothing really to compare the strings to, and ive been playing guitar for 5 years now so to have to come and ask such basic questions like this is fairly embarassing, but does anyone know anything about this? namely:

is it normal?
how can i correct it?

ive also heard about people who've sanded off a portion of the plastic bridge to allow the strings to sit lower across the body. any thoughts on that?

any help is greatly appreciated, im going to take a couple of photos and ill upload those later.
#2
eh... yeah you can sand the bridge, don't touch the nut! If you know a luthier or are willing to dish out around 50$ have a professional do it for you... or have them install a Bone nut and saddle.... and then make them set it up perfectly? lol i dunno, been thinking of trying this...

going to a luthier, having him install a bone nut and saddle with as low of action as possible and no BUZZZZZZZZ not really cuz i care about the material so much as i want as low of action as possible with no DAMN EFFING BUZZING
#3
I would suggest having a guitar techie/luthier do it as well.

What they normally do is take out your saddle and sand the bottom of it(NOT the top where the strings sit). They then adjust the neck bow(with the truss rod) if necessary. The neck bow is never the for adjusting action. It's purpose is to change the bow angle(which can sometimes solve a VERY minor action problem caused by too much of a forward bow).
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- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

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#4
Quote by captivate
I would suggest having a guitar techie/luthier do it as well.

What they normally do is take out your saddle and sand the bottom of it(NOT the top where the strings sit). They then adjust the neck bow(with the truss rod) if necessary. The neck bow is never the for adjusting action. It's purpose is to change the bow angle(which can sometimes solve a VERY minor action problem caused by too much of a forward bow).


or fret buzz.. which is my main problem
#5
Fret buzz in regards to bowing is caused by either a lack of bow(neck is too straight) or a backwards bow. The lack of bow makes for too low clearance for the higher frets, thus creating fret buzz.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
cheers guys, i think ive pretty much sorted it now, ive compared it to a couple of mates' guitars and the difference is now pretty miniscule so i think it just needed that initial adjustment.

i will definitely bear in mind your advice about the saddle though, and more importantly wont do it myself.