#1
Here's my problem, I've recently bought an electric acoustic from ebay and it's a sweet enough guitar but the strings seem to be way too far off the fret board, making playing on it quite difficult.

I've adjusted the truss rod and straightened the neck but still the strings seem too high. I've looked at the bridge and it seems too high, is there anyway to lower the bridge saddle? maybe take it out and sand it down a bit.

Seems like a stupid question but wanted to seek advice before heading straight in and damaging anything.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. =]

Thx
#3
lol, your guitar is probably ruined now because you needlessly adjusted the truss rod without knowing what it actually does.

the saddle and nut are responsible for action, not the truss rod, which is responsible for backbow. for your sake i hope you didnt adjust it too much
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#4
Come on guys, the truss rod and neck bow DO affect action, he said he straightened it, not bowed to back to get lower action derp derp derp...

Yeah, you can sand the saddle down a little bit, there are great tutorials online, bu dont sand it down to much or you'll get horrible fret buzz!!!!
#5
Quote by redking14ca
Come on guys, the truss rod and neck bow DO affect action, he said he straightened it, not bowed to back to get lower action derp derp derp...

Yeah, you can sand the saddle down a little bit, there are great tutorials online, bu dont sand it down to much or you'll get horrible fret buzz!!!!


The truss rod affects bow, which in turn affects action. However, it's wrong to say that truss rod is used to adjust action. The saddle height should be the primary way of adjusting the action.
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#6
Quote by captivate
The truss rod affects bow, which in turn affects action. However, it's wrong to say that truss rod is used to adjust action. The saddle height should be the primary way of adjusting the action.


I know, bro.. i wasn't saying the truss rod is used to adjust action, but it can help.. he said he straightened the neck, not used the truss rod to lower the action
#7
Thx guys, and thx for the concern but the truss rod id fine, i sought out advice from another guitarist with him confirming that the neck had bowed, so i've straightened it and left it at that, but thanks for t=the advice concerning the saddle, do i just remove it and sand down the bottom? Figured i'd seek more advice before attempting an edit.
#8
you CAN, but don't sand off too much, and if it's acoustic electric especially the bottom HAS to be COMPLETELY flat... you should prolly have a professional do it.
#9
Definitely don't take it somewhere. They will charge you too much for something you can do at home. I use and rough nail file that my wife has(she let me use it wasn't too happy, lol) to sand them down. I have done this to a few acoustic electrics and it has turned out just fine. Just do it in steps rather than all at once. Check it every now and then to see if it is low enough for you. That way you avoid doing too much.
#10
Quote by ajricketts
Definitely don't take it somewhere. They will charge you too much for something you can do at home. I use and rough nail file that my wife has(she let me use it wasn't too happy, lol) to sand them down. I have done this to a few acoustic electrics and it has turned out just fine. Just do it in steps rather than all at once. Check it every now and then to see if it is low enough for you. That way you avoid doing too much.


yeah, the guys that did it at the shop i bought mine from ruined my first saddle... and then i ruined the second one
#12
Quote by Tony83
buy another one

i wanted one of the specialized acoustic electric notched fake ivory ones from graphtec "more tone than bone"

for now.. the electrics in my A/E died, so i gutted them, and for the saddle problem i just put a toothpick under it to raise the action so it wouldnt buzz and snap strings....


but i am thinking now of just going to a local music store and having them put a bone saddle and nut on.. that way i can get the perfect setup for my guitar as well..

but its a 300$ guitar, and it seams a little much... might as well buy a whole new guitar
#14
Measure the action at the 12th fret, then decide where you want it to be. Let's say the action is 4 mm and you want it to be 3mm. That's 1mm difference. Since the 12th fret is halfway between the nut and the saddle, that means you need to take 2mm (twice as much) off the saddle. "Davey4557" of Youtube fame suggests this method for removing the excess material: clamp it in a vice with the top of the vice at the correct mark, then grind it down with an electric grinder.

You do this only after adjusting the truss rod so that the relief is about right. There are no hard-and-fast rules for relief. In the course of this exercise, you might find that you need to take too much material off the saddle so that it sinks below the bridge or the string break angle is too low.

My opinion is that you can still use the truss rod to lower the action. Even if the neck is completely flat, so long as there are no buzzes, there's no problem. I have had guitars with completely flat necks that did not buzz. In fact this would seem to be the logical method of adjusting the truss rod: start with no relief and keep increasing it until playability is acceptable (i.e., no buzzes). The only problem is that it's a lot of work, since each time you loosen the truss rod you have to take a little bit off the saddle and each time you do that, you have to loosen the strings and then re-tighten them...
#15
Well GuitarPetey, welcome to UG! Word of advice though, try and let sleeping dogs lie. This thread is 5 years old.....