#1
Heres the story.
Recently i learned Starry Night by Joe Satriani, which is in the key of C. It sounded really good and i love playing it.
Yesterday, i was doing some improv on a jamming track i had which was also in the key of C. I ended up playing Starry Night over it even though it wasn't the backing track for that song and i noticed that it had no-where near the effect of when i played it over the original backing track. It didn't sound anywhere near as soulfull and sounded flat and just like i was doing boring pentatonic noodling.

Why would it sound like this when the backing track is in the same key? It wasn't to do with my playing because i played it the same both times. It just didn't have that wow factor the original had. Is this something to do with chord tone soloing, so that the chord underneath each part of the solo is important?

Or i might just be going mad
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#2
yeah i wud say it wud be to do with the backing.....its not just the solo, its everything involved that makes it so good, when you listen tio the solo section your not just hearing the solo your hearing everything thats being played, which creates he whole sonic experience
#3
The backing chords is what really gives music most of its feel, so yes. Especially so when you have 2 chord progressions in the same key that start on different degrees, because it portrays the feel of an entirely different mode, although I don't think this is the case with Starry Night because it is in C Ionian and I assume your backing track is as well
#4
You're not going mad, that's just the way it is. In a solo it doesn't really matter which notes you play but it matters what their relation is to whatever you're playing it over.
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#5
Quote by pinguinpanic
You're not going mad, that's just the way it is. In a solo it doesn't really matter which notes you play but it matters what their relation is to whatever you're playing it over.


Maybe this is why my solos/improv sounds a bit bland and boring, as i just play random notes on the pentatonic scale that i think sound good. How do you choose the right notes in relation to the chord changes?
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#6
Actually I don't have a clue, I just practiced a lot and eventually it just came to me natural. So I don't think I can be much of a help here. I just experimented a lot with it untill I "found" my sound.

Sorry for the vague answer perhaps someone else knows.
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ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#7
You're not going mad. Notes have a different efect over different chords, bear in mind that Satch's was specifically designed for his song, not someone else's. This means it will probably sound at its best over Starry Night.
#8
id say think of the melodies in your head and translate them to guitar instead of trying to play notes within the scale on your fretboard. I would say good phrasing during improvisation comes from being familiar/proficient enough on your instrument that you can do that in real time...
#9
I lolled. Why do you think there exists something as chord progression.

In almost all music EVERYTHING depends on the melody and harmony relation.

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#10
Quote by nugiboy
Maybe this is why my solos/improv sounds a bit bland and boring, as i just play random notes on the pentatonic scale that i think sound good. How do you choose the right notes in relation to the chord changes?

Start actually thinking about what you're going to play and listening to the results. Are you honestly surprised that playing the melody of a song sounded wrong when you payed it over some random backing? Arguably the most important skill for improvising is know ing how a note will work over the underlying chords, if you're not paying attention to the backing then you're not really soloing.
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#11
Quote by pinguinpanic
Actually I don't have a clue, I just practiced a lot and eventually it just came to me natural. So I don't think I can be much of a help here. I just experimented a lot with it untill I "found" my sound.

Sorry for the vague answer perhaps someone else knows.


Sounds like you have same problem as I and many other guitarists.

Try to train your ear so you can pick the notes out faster or something. It's hard to do I am not good at it either but when you do get good it shows. Ways to do this are do some ear training things you can find them free on the internet. http://musictheory.net is one. Another thing I was told to do is listen to your favorite music and just try to solo over it until.
#12
Why would it sound like this when the backing track is in the same key? It wasn't to do with my playing because i played it the same both times. It just didn't have that wow factor the original had. Is this something to do with chord tone soloing, so that the chord underneath each part of the solo is important?


Unfortunately music is a whole.

It's not like some kind of lego where you can just "click" things together if they're the same key.

Basically, all I can say is listen. Hear the obvious - different things sound different over different things.
#13
What everyone else said. Plus, for me, whenever I'm playing over a backing track, I start really feeling it (if I'm at all in the mood), and feel like I play better.
#14
Quote by Freepower
Basically, all I can say is listen. Hear the obvious - different things sound different over different things.
, this.