#1
Well I know the modes.


Ionian
Dorian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Aeolian
Locrian

Okay. Say if I had a chord progression G Major. What are the relatives (Thats what I think they are called) to the G Major Scale. This is not correct just trying to explain.

Ionian - G
Dorian - F
Phyrigian - A

ect ect.
So if I was to solo over a g scale, what dorian scale could I use ect ect.
Please try and help me 'cos i'm confuse
Thanks
Cam
#2
I might be wrong, but isn't it the other way round?

Wouldn't it go

G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phrygian

etc?
#3
Ye, i didn't know. So i was showing an example off how I wanted it to be set out. Or a way how to figure it out, sorry if you didn't understand.
#4
Oh okay yeah. So the way I understand it, you just count up - the modes have numbers, so you stick them in order, with Ionian first. Then you do your list thing, put Ionian with G, then count up from there. Maybe.

So like

G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phrygian
C Lydian
D Mixolydian
E Aeolian
F Locrian


If I'm talking out of my arse, could someone correct me
#6
^you got the order right, so yeah.

Keeping in mind, T/S, the chords and harmony have a larger say on which mode you're using than whatever pattern you pick. If your progression is G major, you use the G ionian scale. You can't really play A dorian over a Gmajor scale, it will sound exactly the same G ionian.
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#7
Quote by Cammeh
Well I know the modes.


Ionian
Dorian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Aeolian
Locrian

Okay. Say if I had a chord progression G Major. What are the relatives (Thats what I think they are called) to the G Major Scale. This is not correct just trying to explain.

Ionian - G
Dorian - F
Phyrigian - A

ect ect.
So if I was to solo over a g scale, what dorian scale could I use ect ect.
Please try and help me 'cos i'm confuse
Thanks
Cam

If your chord progression was in G then you would look to use G Dorian, if you try to use the relative mode of A dorian, or indeed any of the relative modes, then you'd just be playing in G major still.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
Quote by gabcd86
Oh okay yeah. So the way I understand it, you just count up - the modes have numbers, so you stick them in order, with Ionian first. Then you do your list thing, put Ionian with G, then count up from there. Maybe.

So like

G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phrygian
C Lydian
D Mixolydian
E Aeolian
F Locrian


If I'm talking out of my arse, could someone correct me


You are correct, except that F chord. It should be F#, since it's in G major.
#9
just wondering, the modes to play depends heavily on the chord progression?

could someone give me some examples of when it is more suitable to use the G ionian scale and lets say, the A Dorian scale? what kind of chords must be present to determine the use of A Dorian?
#10
Quote by disillusia
just wondering, the modes to play depends heavily on the chord progression?

could someone give me some examples of when it is more suitable to use the G ionian scale and lets say, the A Dorian scale? what kind of chords must be present to determine the use of A Dorian?


Well, you can play any mode over any chord that is diatonic (in the same key as the whole song). So you just have to play what sounds best for you. But, if you have chords that are from different keys, it's best to play different scales on each chord. Dorian, aeolian and phrygian scales are played over minor chords (dorian and aeolian most often) and mixolydian, ionian and lydian over major chords. Locrian scale is most often played over m7b5 chords.
#11
Quote by disillusia
just wondering, the modes to play depends heavily on the chord progression?

could someone give me some examples of when it is more suitable to use the G ionian scale and lets say, the A Dorian scale? what kind of chords must be present to determine the use of A Dorian?
A dorian: Am7 - Am7 - D7

G ionian: Gmaj - Cmaj - Dmaj

You might want to give this thread a look over: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=999592
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[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#12
Quote by gabcd86
Oh okay yeah. So the way I understand it, you just count up - the modes have numbers, so you stick them in order, with Ionian first. Then you do your list thing, put Ionian with G, then count up from there. Maybe.

So like

G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phrygian
C Lydian
D Mixolydian
E Aeolian
F Locrian


If I'm talking out of my arse, could someone correct me


Ye, but how do you work that our for other scales?
#13
It's always the same, the modes are in the same order and the scale degrees.
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#14
Modes shine through BIG when you only have 1 guitar player and no other harmonic instruments other then bass.


If a Bass player plays A And you under stand the modes, you can play so much variations, since there are no limitations on harmony.

Check the 2nd in my sig for basic modal progressions and explained a bit more.

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