#1
After finding out in my previous thread that the chords your improvising over actually are important to what sounds good, i realised i should try and find out how to make my solos have more of a point instead of just going up and down the penta scale. I was looking on google and sound this.

The theory speaks about two ways to approach improvisation:

The vertical approach – the player solos according to the current chord.

The horizontal approach – the player solos according to the current scale


I came to realise i'm stuck on the 'horizontal approach' and thats why my solos can send a baby to sleep. I need to learn chord soloing, but i don't know how. I've got an idea but i need a bit of starting knowledge on it.
Say there was a C major progression of:

C-Dm-F-Am

How would i chord solo this? Does it mean just play the 3 notes of the triad for each chord as the chords come up? Or does it mean over C i play something in C major and over D i play something in D minor?

Give me some ammo! A lesson thread, a site. Anything!
Are You Shpongled..?
Last edited by nugiboy at Jan 1, 2009,
#2
^Tis an easy answer, sir. It's what we were talking about in the last bit.


The "vertical approach" is called "playing the changes". "Changes" is a jazzy term for chord changes (or: progression). All you do is focus on the chord you're soloing over. Focus on the tones in it and all that stuff. For a good thing on this, look up Marty Friedman's Melodic Control video.

The "horizontal approach" is just thinking "oh I'm in this key, so I'll use this scale and follow it".


For your example, that would come out to:

"Vertical"-

I'm playing C major, I'll hit the B note because 7ths are dissonant and then I'll go down to the 3rd which is more consonant and then I'll add flavor by hitting a b5 and then b2... oh now a D minor is coming up, D F and A are my "safe" notes, I'll mess with the A to sound real "nice" right now...oh an F major....


"Horizontal"-

That's in the key of C so I'll use the C major scale and dick around.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#3
Quote by metal4all
^Tis an easy answer, sir. It's what we were talking about in the last bit.


The "vertical approach" is called "playing the changes". "Changes" is a jazzy term for chord changes (or: progression). All you do is focus on the chord you're soloing over. Focus on the tones in it and all that stuff. For a good thing on this, look up Marty Friedman's Melodic Control video.

The "horizontal approach" is just thinking "oh I'm in this key, so I'll use this scale and follow it".


For your example, that would come out to:

"Vertical"-

I'm playing C major, I'll hit the B note because 7ths are dissonant and then I'll go down to the 3rd which is more consonant and then I'll add flavor by hitting a b5 and then b2... oh now a D minor is coming up, D F and A are my "safe" notes, I'll mess with the A to sound real "nice" right now...oh an F major....



"Horizontal"-

That's in the key of C so I'll use the C major scale and dick around.


So it sounds like you really have to know your fretboard and the notes of chords inside out to do this.
Are You Shpongled..?
#4
Quote by nugiboy
So it sounds like you really have to know your fretboard and the notes of chords inside out to do this.
Oh hell yeah.

When I'd get bored in school, I'd take out a piece of paper and think of a key. After I did that I'd write out the 7 basic triads in it and every note in the triad. I'd do that in like every key.

I'd write out the Co5, too so I could always remember how many sharps/flats every key has.

There are shapes to triads on the fretboard. You can invert those shapes twice and use them starting on any 3 adjacent strings. If you know the notes of the fretboard, you can find your triad notes anywhere near your fingers.


Tip from the master Joe Satriani: Set your metronome on a really slow level. Think of a note and find it on the board every time it beeps. Keep it slow enough that you get it right. Don't speed it up if you can't do it.

Also, there's this: http://www.musictheory.net/trainers/html/id81_en.html


If you have any questions, comments, anything, ask/post away. I gotta go for tonight though (I think).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#5
For starters stick with major and minor triads. You might want to learn the standard
5 positions for each of these arpeggios so you can play them all over the neck. There's
lots of other ways to learn the arpeggiated triads, but that's as good as any.

Now take a chord progression. Start simple -- maybe only 2 chords, and practice
walking the arpeggios over the neck with the chords.

Do lots of that. Also learn playing diatonic ascending and descending triads in all
inversions. Up and down and across the neck.

Practicing triads and arpeggios is one of those things that is so important you should
really plan on doing some aspect of it every day.
#6
If you were to play to the "chord" I guess that site is saying to play the scale to which would be

C - Play C Ionian Scale
Dm - Play D Dorian
F - Play F Lydian
Am - Play A Aeolian

That's a modal approach really used in jazz.

Or They could be saying to play arpeggios which are the notes in a chord played separately.

The vertical and horizontal approach are bs terms.

When your playing be "creative". I say you mess with the all three ways of playing. Playing just the pentatonic scale for a solo. Then playing the modes or changes. And then just playing arpeggios for the chords. You can have a feel for all the areas and then incorporate them all into your playing. Not necessarily all the time though.

And think of your own ways to make interesting solos. For example one of the things I do sometimes is I will play in the regular old blued pentatonic scale box then for a second or two move the box up a step and then back down. I would be hitting pretty random notes but if I find the note to be odd sounding I can always just bend it up to sound better.
Duke Ellington - If it sounds good, it is good.
#7
Quote by edg
For starters stick with major and minor triads. You might want to learn the standard
5 positions for each of these arpeggios so you can play them all over the neck. There's
lots of other ways to learn the arpeggiated triads, but that's as good as any.

Now take a chord progression. Start simple -- maybe only 2 chords, and practice
walking the arpeggios over the neck with the chords.

Do lots of that. Also learn playing diatonic ascending and descending triads in all
inversions. Up and down and across the neck.

Practicing triads and arpeggios is one of those things that is so important you should
really plan on doing some aspect of it every day.
+1,000,000,000

I try not to kiss your ass too much but I swear, every time you post it's always: true, helpful, and full of the wisdom you have in your years of playing. You deserve more respect dude. (you AND Mr. Seagull)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#8
Quote by metal4all
+1,000,000,000

I try not to kiss your ass too much but I swear, every time you post it's always: true, helpful, and full of the wisdom you have in your years of playing. You deserve more respect dude. (you AND Mr. Seagull)


LOL.

Working a little bit every day on triads is the #1 simple thing anybody can do that will
help their playing in many different ways. All you have to do is repeat and repeat them.
Not much else is required. If you're patient, things will definitely be revealed as you go.