#1
People recommend accenting notes well practicing, but how to you do it exactly?
At first I put a bit more force into my pick attack compared to the others, but you can't hear that through an amp. After a while I started doing this almost half assed pinch harmonic type thing, after realizing that you can do a PH on a down stroke too. This however sounds too different through an amp. Stealing all the volume compared to the non accented notes.
#2
try to make it sound more like a popping, grab your string with a finger and lift it, first gently, then gradually, harder till it sounds really accentuated, but that... a bit useless
anyway, why is people recommending you to accentuate notes?
#3
Accent? Like when you see those little ^'s and >'s in music?
I'm guessing your talking about volume, well your pinch harmonic thing works, also hitting it with more of the p[ick should produce a louder more sudden sound, quickly mutting the note helps accent it too
#4
well, there is several ways to do this, one is the amount of force you aply when picking, but as i think you have discovered, this does not work very well with alot of distortion.

second, and told by John petrucci: the amount of surface of the pick, that you let touch the string, the more volume, so if you just let the tip of the pick strike the string, it won't be very loud, and if you pick very "deep" you will get more sound, john p says this as the way to accent doing exercises.

third, told to me by my teacher, is the angle of the pick, this effect the sound of a note, not that much the volume.

fourth, told to me by some dude who played guitar for 40 years: you get a different sound, if the strings vibrate in different ways compared to the pickups: meaning that if the strings vibrate so that they move up and down over the pickups, you get one sound, and if they vibrate in the same height over the pickups, from side to side, you get another sound. only way i know to aply this is changing from picking with picks to pick with the fingers..
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#5
Quote by Veqq
People recommend accenting notes well practicing, but how to you do it exactly?
At first I put a bit more force into my pick attack compared to the others, but you can't hear that through an amp.


Accenting IS putting more force into the string causing a larger amplitude in vibration.
It's usually related to both the force of the pick stroke and other aspects of pick attack.

Of COURSE you can hear it through an amp. That is, unless you've gobbed on so much
gain, effects and distortion that you've removed all the dynamics from your signal. That's
entirely possible. The simple cure is to adjust your settings to allow the dynamics you
play to be transmitted. The downside is you'll actually HAVE to control your dynamics.
A lot of people can't and that's why they set the equipment to eliminate most of the
dynamics.
#7
That being said I don't think I've ever piled on enough effects to be able to completely drown out dynamics.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#8
It might not take as much as you think. The best way to tell is record yourself and look
at the sample waveform in a software program. Good settings for dynamics will have
the height of the peaks all over the place. No dynamics will look like a nearly flat bar --
every note you hit, no matter what you do, comes out basically the same. Just some
compression can do that.
#9
My recording equipment isn't exactly up to defining much as it is, so that test wouldn't be so effective. My microphone currently has the (copper?) insulation missing from around its cable and I use a converter to plug it into my none too good sound card.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#10
Palm mute when practicing accentuating rhythmic groupings. I don't exactly know why and how this works but somehow the sharp attack and decay of palm muting brings out dynamics better. Atleast this is the case with me. I'm thinking along the lines and tones of Paul Gilbert here. Distorted but stick twangy and relatively clean. Try your middle pick up if you have one; I find it yields a cleaner tone. Of course the best possible way to practice this would be to cut of any over drive completely. Accent notes with a completely clean tone precisely and accurately and keep on adding the distorting until you get to that point, as Edg pointed out, where everything is just plain loud and nothing in between.


Although, I must add; there's nothing wrong in adding a lot of gain so as to compress any dynamics to the extreme of not hearing any distinct accents but it is VERY important you accent notes that are supposed to be. It helps with your rhythmic groupings and yields a cleaner a more accurate style of playing even if the accents themselves are not heard in very high gain and effect settings. What can I say, you can and should always 'feel' the accents.
#11
I agree about the palm muting thing, and i think the string rings slightly louder just before it's muted because the harder pick attack pushes it further from the palm.
#12
Quote by edg
Accenting IS putting more force into the string causing a larger amplitude in vibration.
It's usually related to both the force of the pick stroke and other aspects of pick attack.

Of COURSE you can hear it through an amp. That is, unless you've gobbed on so much
gain, effects and distortion that you've removed all the dynamics from your signal. That's
entirely possible. The simple cure is to adjust your settings to allow the dynamics you
play to be transmitted. The downside is you'll actually HAVE to control your dynamics.
A lot of people can't and that's why they set the equipment to eliminate most of the
dynamics.

yes. if you can hear it through the amp, probably have too much distortion or effects.