#1
I was looking at the music theory lesson and i thought i understood steps until i reached this part of the lesson...

You apply that in any key (I'm using C again) and you get the major scale.

C D E F G A B C
W W H W W W H


Notice how those notes fit right into the formula? Let’s try it with E.

E F# G# A B C# D# E
W W H W W W H


i dont understand. i thought when you go up a whole step, it goes up a whole letter and a half step its sharp or flat.

help?
#3
The difference between notes is not always a whole tone (whole step)

Inbetween B and C is only a half step, and the same with E and F.

So B-C is only 1 fret difference on a guitar and so is E - F - A whole step up from B is C# and a whole step up from E is F#.
wat.
#4
it depends. in the case of E, a half step would be an E# (or F, as it is more commonly known), and a whole step from E is E double sharp (or F#). certain notes don't have a note inbetween the next whole note, such as B to C and E to F. a Cb for example is enharmonic with B.

C major, A minor, E Phygrian, B Locrian, D Dorian, F Lydian, and G Mixolydian are the only scales that won't have any accidentals (all these scales are in the C Major mode, which is why)
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#5
The entire scale is A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#
between b-c and e-f, there is no sharp or flat, so it is a half step between those notes
#6
Quote by SsPunk
The difference between notes is not always a whole tone (whole step)

Inbetween B and C is only a half step, and the same with E and F.

So B-C is only 1 fret difference on a guitar and so is E - F - A whole step up from B is C# and a whole step up from E is F#.

oh yeah, i forgot that step. thanks... im prolly gonna use this thread in the future since im still learning about music theory