#1
One of the goals as a musician is getting to a point of being able to play what I hear. How do I get to this point?

I'm begun taking lessons, and the guy is hitting me with full theory. I know that's a major part of it. I of course intend on continuing.

I have a software on the Iphone that's playing a note and asking me to identify it. I currently have about a 70% correctness on white keys on the keyboard after 2 months of playing with it.

I have another software that's more focused on relative pitch, but I've yet to find time to start on it.

I'm getting the basic progression, but how do I get to the point of hearing something and recognizing the progression?

What else should I do? I think my biggest weakness on the guitar is not being to identify notes on my guitar.
#2
It just takes practice. The more you play the guitar, the more familiar you'll become with it.

Figure out songs by ear instead of reading tabs.
#4
I believe that you will need to learn to stop trying to play what you hear by picking out what the individual notes are and instead focus more on movement of the music. It's great to be able to recognize a note, but if you have to do that same thing for every note in the song, than it's going to take a lot longer than if you were to recognize a pattern you already know and base it off that.

What theory does is point out the relationships between notes and turns them into patterns. Ear training helps you play with other notes, but it doesn't help you do anything but to hear a note faster and more accurately. It's the theory that turns those series of single notes into a phrase, and within every phrase is any number of patterns that theory can teach you.
#5
play patterns on your guitar, say three note patterns like say the first second and third of a major scale for example. in a major scale the first second and third make the pattern Whole then another whole. this pattern would be like playing a 7--9---11 in tab. pick diffrent patterns and try to be able to play the patterns from a song without looking at the tab from ear. once you can hear patterns in lines, and tell the relative distance between notes you can start to learn to play things by ear.

hopefully that made sense to you lol.
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#6
Quote by PlayingWithFood
I believe that you will need to learn to stop trying to play what you hear by picking out what the individual notes are and instead focus more on movement of the music. It's great to be able to recognize a note, but if you have to do that same thing for every note in the song, than it's going to take a lot longer than if you were to recognize a pattern you already know and base it off that.

What theory does is point out the relationships between notes and turns them into patterns. Ear training helps you play with other notes, but it doesn't help you do anything but to hear a note faster and more accurately. It's the theory that turns those series of single notes into a phrase, and within every phrase is any number of patterns that theory can teach you.


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Last edited by Tempoe at Jan 1, 2009,
#7
I'm assuming that you're wanting to play on your guitar what you hear right?

Cause in that case, it really helps to know the fretboard.
Play a note and try to identify it and imitate it with your voice.

And try to hear the intervals and stuff in music. Visualize them without the guitar in front of you.
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#8
Quote by PlayingWithFood
I believe that you will need to learn to stop trying to play what you hear by picking out what the individual notes are and instead focus more on movement of the music. It's great to be able to recognize a note, but if you have to do that same thing for every note in the song, than it's going to take a lot longer than if you were to recognize a pattern you already know and base it off that.

What theory does is point out the relationships between notes and turns them into patterns. Ear training helps you play with other notes, but it doesn't help you do anything but to hear a note faster and more accurately. It's the theory that turns those series of single notes into a phrase, and within every phrase is any number of patterns that theory can teach you.


Okay what's actual drills I can do that? I hear something, and I'm able to identify a phrase. I can reproduce the song by singing it.

What's drills I can do to figure the progressions? I can figure out the progression by looking at the lead sheet and chord. But I can't figure out it by just listening to a song.

One of the goals for these couple of months is be able to know where all the notes are on a fretboard.
Last edited by d1sturbanc3 at Jan 5, 2009,
#9
Quote by d1sturbanc3
I have a software on the Iphone that's playing a note and asking me to identify it. I currently have about a 70% correctness on white keys on the keyboard after 2 months of playing with it.


I envy you.
#10
TS, it sounds to me like you've got the right idea about this, keep going and good luck.

What else should I do? I think my biggest weakness on the guitar is not being to identify notes on my guitar.


Try the first 3 theory links in my sig. I'm sure you'll have a few "duh, that's obvious!" moments, but I've tried to organise fretboard principles in such a way that you'll find it much easier to learn the whole fretboard.
#12
I would try taking a common melody (nursery rhymes, anthems, traditional songs etc...) and try working them out. Don't worry about the rhythm, but try to, in your head, hear what note it is, so that you get every note right on the first try. Eventually it will come faster, and youll be able to do it in time.

It also helps to be very conscious of the key its in....
#13
It also helps greatly if you memorise exactly what each interval sounds like by associating it with something (e.g. minor 6th -> November Rain solo etc.). That way, when you hear the interval, even if just in your head, you'll know what it is, so that will help you out greatly.
#14
What is that Iphone app you have TS?
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#15
Quote by HyperBoy2519
What is that Iphone app you have TS?

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#16
by listening to what you play, what others play and how instruments interact with each other.

whether it be from on a record, in a live situation, in your own jams.

the key word is listening to the music and it's underlying rhythm/beat, even the stuff you product from dicking around.

through trial and error you'll learn what notes sound good over certain chords (e.g f over a, ab over g - no no no), which notes sound good together (e and d, vomit, g# and anything - bucket time) and what notes you can quickly pass over, what notes you can very subtly (think jeff beck subtle) bend and add vibrato to to make them fit in with the surrounding notes, even though, normally, it would sound very dissonant.

additionally, or at least, in my opinion, your views on dissonance are altered as you begin to view it as a viable tool, another option in your repertoire since you know when it will sound acceptable and when it won't.

essentially, the main thing you want to remember is that you are in control of the guitar (and amp); not the other way around. thus, you are free to coax, smash, squeeze, wrench, pluck, batter, ggg, force, encourage and punch sounds of it.
#17
Quote by Tagg

through trial and error you'll learn what notes sound good over certain chords (e.g f over a, ab over g - no no no), which notes sound good together (e and d, vomit, g# and anything - bucket time)


this is inaccurate. when used properly ANY note/s can sound good over any other grouping/s of note/s. jazz is pretty much proof of this

as for playing what you hear, it takes time. more for some people than others. just keep playing and keep playing, i've found that it usually takes years and years and eventually one day you'll hear something on the radio and say "i bet thats this and this" then you'll pick up your guitar and find that you're either spot on or got most of it right.
#18
Z4twenny made a valid point on that part of ur reply.

However I agree with some of that TAgg.

This has been asked quite frequently in MT, and I made a analysis and problem solving text for it, which is written below;


Analysis & Solving


-You get overwhelmed by the amount of notes.
I can remember when I heard my first shred line, I found it difficult to transcribe. I isolated the licks, I learned what they played.

Start out by checking for traits of ur favourite artists. What scale he uses, or better yet which notes he favours, and his techniques. Often there's a chance it's not in the notes he play, but in the way he phrases, which could be "misleading" in what you hear. This is especially true for guitar players because of the (infinite) amount of ways to sonically produce sound out of the instrument. (Whammy pedals, whammy bars, Volume swells, fx units in general, pinch/natural/semi harmonics, slides & bends) etc.

-You don't listen good enough-

Self explanatory really. You get to much carried away by 1 thing in the piece that you let the other stuff that's going on in the music subconsciously pass by.

When you listen to music, this is not that weird, and Imo even preferred to not lose focus of how everything sounds as a whole. However when you want to transcribe, you have to change this approach and need "to sit down and really listen" to the different instruments.

You subconsciously hear what you wanna hear

This is very common, and perhaps the most common. Sometimes people transcribe, and mix up notes with other notes that work well over the chord. They get carried away by the feeling of "it sounds right".

There's a difference between playing the sound and playing the sound that could aurally also be pleasant to play(over the chord or given passage). To give a very rough example: 'playing 2 different solo's in the pentatonic scale over the same progression'. Only you don't mix entire solo's up, but interchange some pentatonic notes for other pentatonic notes (What I see often with my students is interchanging the note and it's relevant 5th, and sometimes even 3rds).

Aurally it doesn't sound "Wrong", but you will end up with a feeling of "it misses something" or "it doesn't sound quite right as the original"

This just takes a thorough listening, and not only will it increase ur aural abilities, but there's a big chance you will listen to artist and "hear stuff" in a different way.


-You are Deaf-

If your deaf you can't transcribe, likewise you can't hear the music so you don't have to. I know it sound stupid, but just stating the possibilities

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 6, 2009,
#19
Quote by d1sturbanc3
Okay what's actual drills I can do that? I hear something, and I'm able to identify a phrase. I can reproduce the song by singing it.

What's drills I can do to figure the progressions? I can figure out the progression by looking at the lead sheet and chord. But I can't figure out it by just listening to a song.

One of the goals for these couple of months is be able to know where all the notes are on a fretboard.


You don't need to do drills. You already know the entire fretboard, and don't need to focus so much on knowing exactly where every single note is at a moments notice. What drills will do is help you play faster. Your hands don't know what notes you want to play, and sure as hell doesn't know what notes you hear. While you can play incredibly fast with enough practice, if you don't understand or feel the music, than your speed of sound hands will sound like crap.

If you really want practice tips though, instead of using that ipod thing by itself, you should have your guitar handy. Listen to the note on the ipod and then try to play it on the guitar. Then check to see if you're right. When you feel confident enough, start picking out songs you don't know how to play that sound easy and put them on the ipod and listen. Enjoy it, but learn it at the same time.

In my opinion, you should learn to identify the patterns you play in songs or riffs you already know, and find out where you can hear them in other songs. When you listen to music you need to actively hear those patterns that you're familiar with, then string together those patterns to get the finished product, which is you playing a song that you just heard.

Now, to keep learning new patterns, you have to learn the deviations from the patterns. Notice that the drummer doesn't hit the snare on a certain beat when he normally does? Do a few notes in the guitar riff suddenly descend instead of ascending? When you figure these out you won't be surprised by changes in the pattern, and you'll have more control over them.

Turn on the radio and listen for a 3-4 note phrase that you think you might already know how to play and try to play it. If you can play it, then great, do it again. If not then try again with a different phrase. Eventually the amount of notes you could play along with should increase, and the radio can be a limitless supply of new things to hear to keep you on your toes.
Last edited by PlayingWithFood at Jan 6, 2009,