#1
So the action on my acoustic guitar is kinda high and it makes it difficult to play. Is there anyway to lower it?
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#2
Sand down the bridge.
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#3
how would I do that?
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#4
Sandpaper
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
yeah was weird cause she liked us both but she loved him and for some reason she let me know beforehand.

i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

so i had myself some poon.
#5
lol no sh*t, but how would I get the bridge off and back on again
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#6
First of all you can lower it with the truss rod. There are a lot of people to say you can't do that to lower action. I used to think that. I took a guitar to a luthier for a bone saddle. He adjusted the string height with the truss rod. I stood there and watched him.

What you need to do is loosen the strings and make 1 complete turn of the truss rod clockwise and repeat until you get the height you want. Then tighten then tune to pitch. Do not over tighten. If it is overly difficult to turn stop.
#7
I recently had this problem with my acoustic guitar as well. This site was a great guide to lowering the action via saddle. Doesnt take long at all and works great!
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#8
Yeah, by bridge he meant saddle. You know, that little white thing on the bridge? You sand a little bit off of the top.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#9
Quote by Guitar Hack
First of all you can lower it with the truss rod. There are a lot of people to say you can't do that to lower action. I used to think that. I took a guitar to a luthier for a bone saddle. He adjusted the string height with the truss rod. I stood there and watched him.

What you need to do is loosen the strings and make 1 complete turn of the truss rod clockwise and repeat until you get the height you want. Then tighten then tune to pitch. Do not over tighten. If it is overly difficult to turn stop.


Okay, do NOT do that! You can go that route, but in the case of truss rods, little by little works best, 1/4 turn at the most at a time, unless you want to warp your neck and cause ir-repairable damage. My buddy did that on his Taylor that his rich parents bought him.... I couldn't help but laugh as he tightened it on accident and snapped the neck in two haha.
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
yeah was weird cause she liked us both but she loved him and for some reason she let me know beforehand.

i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

so i had myself some poon.
#10
ok sweet thanks for the help
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Peavey Vypyr 75
Digitech Metal Master
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Yamaha Acoustic
#11
Quote by Guitar Hack
First of all you can lower it with the truss rod. There are a lot of people to say you can't do that to lower action. I used to think that. I took a guitar to a luthier for a bone saddle. He adjusted the string height with the truss rod. I stood there and watched him.

What you need to do is loosen the strings and make 1 complete turn of the truss rod clockwise and repeat until you get the height you want. Then tighten then tune to pitch. Do not over tighten. If it is overly difficult to turn stop.


I would suggest that you find a different repair person to bring your guitars to in the future. Did he explain to you the mechanics of how a truss rod works? Do you understand how they work? Have you ever seen the inside of a guitars neck? One complete turn of any truss rod is extreme, and damage very well can result from such a drastic change to the geometry of the neck. It's all about tension here and gradual changes which allow the neck time to adapt to those changes. One whole turn of the truss is overdoing it by a long shot.
Truss rods do effect string height, but only marginally as compared to saddle and nut height. It's there to compensate for the natural inward pull of the strings on the neck. It's most effective in the middle of it's range of influence on the fretboard, which is around the 7-9th fret area. Moving out away from that point, the effect that the truss has on the neck gets less until you reach the nut and the joint where the neck joins the body of the guitar, typically the 14th fret. Beyond those two points, the truss rod has no effect on string height.
Not only all of that, but there is a logical progression of adjustments that are made to a guitar for a good setup. Nut slots/height need to be considered, then the truss/fretboard relief should be addressed. Lastly the bridge saddle height and compensation for intonation needs to be checked/adjusted.
#12
For such a commonly asked question Im suprised at the amount of misinformation in this thread.

Sand down the bridge.


You mean saddle, not bridge.

First of all you can lower it with the truss rod. There are a lot of people to say you can't do that to lower action. I used to think that. I took a guitar to a luthier for a bone saddle. He adjusted the string height with the truss rod. I stood there and watched him.

What you need to do is loosen the strings and make 1 complete turn of the truss rod clockwise and repeat until you get the height you want. Then tighten then tune to pitch. Do not over tighten. If it is overly difficult to turn stop.


I would strongly advise against this.

Yeah, by bridge he meant saddle. You know, that little white thing on the bridge? You sand a little bit off of the top.


Dont sand off the top. Remove it and sand the bottom.

Threadstarter, if you're in a DIY mood, go here: http://frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/LowerAction/loweraction01.html

If not, take it to a shop and tell them what you want.
#13
Quote by tom183
For such a commonly asked question Im suprised at the amount of misinformation in this thread.

Dont sand off the top. Remove it and sand the bottom.

Threadstarter, if you're in a DIY mood, go here: http://frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/LowerAction/loweraction01.html

If not, take it to a shop and tell them what you want.

Oh, right. Sorry, forgot about that. I was thinking of shaping a saddle, not lowering action.

My bad dude, sorry!
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#15
Bring your guitar to a professional. Once you shave your bridge down, your action will be what it will be....Very easy to screw up your guitar for good.... Bring it to a shop with truss rod and see if adjustment does trick..If not.let THEM work with bridge/saddle...
#16
honestly its a pretty easy thing to do. I havent done anything to my guitars, other than change strings and what not, and shaving down the bridge wasnt hard to figure out. Just read the links Tom183 or I gave (they are the same) and follow what he did. Dont waste money on something that is simple and rewarding to do by yourself! You can learn quite alot from the site, and I definitely recommend trying it out

If you read it all and still arent confident then maybe take it to someone
Epiphone G-310 SG
Epiphone Hummingbird
Yamaha CG-101
Peavey Classic 30
#17
Yeah, basically if you ever have a question about acoustic guitars, just go to frets.com. That place is AWESOME!
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#18
The action on an acoustic is the result of a whole matrix of things that work in concert with one another. None of these suggestions are worth the time it took to write them, absent any idea of the CAUSE of the high action. It could be something as simple as the string gauges being too heavy for the guitar, or as nasty and unbiddable as the neck needing to be reset.

If you're new enough to this that you would ask if it's "possible" to lower the action then I would suggest that you need someone experienced with setups on acoustics (don't go to a Strat guy). Hopefully he will be honest enough to tell you if it's worth your trouble and expense...depends what kind of guitar it is and what its worth.

If it's a beater it might cost more than the axe is worth to make it play right.