#1
since i'm getting into writing music and improvising stuff if i'm just pissing around, i would like to know some good scales for funk music.

second question i was looking about how to create chord progressions and use already made one's, i noticed that sometimes they would use i- or I- does it matter or do they both still mean 1st note.

just questions i had in my head figure i would ask them

thanks nathan
#2
first question i have no answer to, but am interested to see what people come up with.

second question, when talking about chords, I means a major chord, i means minor.
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#3
Quote by TK1
first question i have no answer to, but am interested to see what people come up with.

second question, when talking about chords, I means a major chord, i means minor.


o ok so say c is the first note I would mean C major and i would mean C minor. does this mean capitals are always major lower case are minor? lets say iV and IV and lets say c is the 4th note again would this mean iV is minor and IV is major?
#4
The i or I refers to the root chord of a key. The lower case i refers to a minor chord and the upper case I refers to a major chord. Very briefly, let's refer to the key of C major - it has no sharps or flats, so it's easier to work with.

C D E F G A B

There's all of the notes we'd expect to find in the key of C major. These also happen to be the chords in the key of C:

I ii iii IV V vi VII
C Dm Em F G Am B

You'll notice I've placed Roman numerals above each of the chords. The numerals specify whether a chord is major or minor. The ii, iii and vi chords are minor. In reality, the VII chord is actually diminished, but for the sake of this lesson, we're not going to worry about that. All of these chords are said to be diatonic to the key of C. In other words, they all naturally occur in the key of C. If we were to see a C# in a song written in the key of C, this chord would not be diatonic.

Chord progressions can be anything that sounds good to your ear, but common ones include the I, IV, V, the I, vi, IV, V, the I, ii, IV, V and countless others.

We can also have a song that's written in a minor key. Let's take a brief look at the key of Am, with Roman numerals:

i II III iv v VI VII
Am B C Dm Em F G

Anything about that key look familiar? It should. If you said it has the same notes as the C major, you'd be right. Now you can see why the Roman numerals are so important. This minor scale was developed from the vi scale degree of the key of C major. It goes by a couple of different names:

Relative minor
Natural minor
Aeolian

The first two mean the same thing, but the last one is actually a mode. Without going into a lot of theory or detail, a mode is nothing more using a different root note of a major scale. By the way, the modal name for C major is Ionian. If I were to play the notes of C major, but start off on a D as my root, I'd be playing in Dorian mode. You're probably scratching your head right now, but not to worry, you'll learn this stuff in time.

That should be more than enough to get you going and creating chord progressions. One last thing you need to know. The formula for creating any major scale is W, W, H, W, W, W, H.

W = Whole step
H = Half step

Go back and look at the key of C major and this should make sense. Good luck! Any questions? Just drop me a PM.
#5
funk guitar is usually pretty simple in terms of the composition... the guitar is more of a rhythm instrument for 90% of your average funk jam, and it usually just plays one or two chords over and over, or one riff / hook / melody line over and over. there is sometimes a bridge, which is also quite rhythmic for the guitar.

the solos in funk guitar are off the hook though... minor pentatonic is by far the most common, since it's easy to apply to any tune, and most funk is in a minor key anyways. you could obviously use the natural minor, and any the minor-sounding modes too, such as phrygian and dorian. the harmonic and melodic minor scales work well too. the nice thing about funk is that when you do a guitar solo, it's usually a very simple, rhythmically pleasing jam that you get to solo over, and you can use almost any scale you want.
#6
Quote by nath1142
o ok so say c is the first note I would mean C major and i would mean C minor. does this mean capitals are always major lower case are minor? lets say iV and IV and lets say c is the 4th note again would this mean iV is minor and IV is major?



We'll never mix upper and lower case for the same chord. You'll never see a chord identified as Vi, or iI. It just isn't possible. A good understanding of chord construction would really help here. Since we're only talking about major and minor chords, let's do a real quick lesson on building chords.

C D E F G A B

Up above, we see the notes from the key of C major. We don't have any chords constructed yet, since we're only looking at notes. Let's take a quick peek at what makes a major chord major.

I iii V

This is the formula for making a major chord - any major chord!!! Let's take another look at the notes and their Roman numeral designations:

I ii iii IV V vi VII
C D E F G A B

I didn't include the minor designations after D, E and A, since we're interested in making a chord. Remember that I said the formula for making any major chord is I, iii, V? Look at those notes and tell me which notes those are. Did you say C, E and G? You're right. When you play a C major chord, you're only playing a C, E and G, even if you're playing a barre chord and have all 6 strings being played. Check it out for yourself. Now then, let's say we need an F major chord. We can use this same scale to figure out which notes it has. Start on the F and skip 1. We have an A. Start on the A and skip another. Now we have a C. The F major chord should have an F, A and C in it. It sure does. Cool, eh? How about a C minor chord? What makes it minor? That's an easy one. The minor chord has a flatted 3rd degree, or biii. That means it should have the notes C, Eb and G. If we play those notes, we have our Cm. You'll notice I said Eb instead of saying D#. Why? Because each note must be named in our scale. If I said C, D# and G it's technically correct, but then we end up with a scale progression of C, D, D#, F, G, A, B. See what happened? We ended up with D being named twice and skipped E. Each note must be used once and once only. We could actually create another scale, one that has Eb in it, and build our minor chord that way, but I really want to keep this simple and not overload you.

Again, if you have any questions, just drop me a PM.
#7
Quote by KG6_Steven
The i or I refers to the root chord of a key. The lower case i refers to a minor chord and the upper case I refers to a major chord. Very briefly, let's refer to the key of C major - it has no sharps or flats, so it's easier to work with.

C D E F G A B

There's all of the notes we'd expect to find in the key of C major. These also happen to be the chords in the key of C:

I ii iii IV V vi VII
C Dm Em F G Am B

You'll notice I've placed Roman numerals above each of the chords. The numerals specify whether a chord is major or minor. The ii, iii and vi chords are minor. In reality, the VII chord is actually diminished, but for the sake of this lesson, we're not going to worry about that. All of these chords are said to be diatonic to the key of C. In other words, they all naturally occur in the key of C. If we were to see a C# in a song written in the key of C, this chord would not be diatonic.

Chord progressions can be anything that sounds good to your ear, but common ones include the I, IV, V, the I, vi, IV, V, the I, ii, IV, V and countless others.

We can also have a song that's written in a minor key. Let's take a brief look at the key of Am, with Roman numerals:

i II III iv v VI VII
Am B C Dm Em F G

Anything about that key look familiar? It should. If you said it has the same notes as the C major, you'd be right. Now you can see why the Roman numerals are so important. This minor scale was developed from the vi scale degree of the key of C major. It goes by a couple of different names:

Relative minor
Natural minor
Aeolian

The first two mean the same thing, but the last one is actually a mode. Without going into a lot of theory or detail, a mode is nothing more using a different root note of a major scale. By the way, the modal name for C major is Ionian. If I were to play the notes of C major, but start off on a D as my root, I'd be playing in Dorian mode. You're probably scratching your head right now, but not to worry, you'll learn this stuff in time.

That should be more than enough to get you going and creating chord progressions. One last thing you need to know. The formula for creating any major scale is W, W, H, W, W, W, H.

W = Whole step
H = Half step

Go back and look at the key of C major and this should make sense. Good luck! Any questions? Just drop me a PM.


lol thanks man i already new that guess i probable could have answered my own question i might pm u some more complicated stuff but again thanks
#8
Quote by frigginjerk
funk guitar is usually pretty simple in terms of the composition... the guitar is more of a rhythm instrument for 90% of your average funk jam, and it usually just plays one or two chords over and over, or one riff / hook / melody line over and over. there is sometimes a bridge, which is also quite rhythmic for the guitar.

the solos in funk guitar are off the hook though... minor pentatonic is by far the most common, since it's easy to apply to any tune, and most funk is in a minor key anyways. you could obviously use the natural minor, and any the minor-sounding modes too, such as phrygian and dorian. the harmonic and melodic minor scales work well too. the nice thing about funk is that when you do a guitar solo, it's usually a very simple, rhythmically pleasing jam that you get to solo over, and you can use almost any scale you want.


thanks ya the solo's is what i really wanted to know the scales for just something to mess around with
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
We'll never mix upper and lower case for the same chord. You'll never see a chord identified as Vi, or iI. It just isn't possible. A good understanding of chord construction would really help here. Since we're only talking about major and minor chords, let's do a real quick lesson on building chords.

C D E F G A B

Up above, we see the notes from the key of C major. We don't have any chords constructed yet, since we're only looking at notes. Let's take a quick peek at what makes a major chord major.

I iii V

This is the formula for making a major chord - any major chord!!! Let's take another look at the notes and their Roman numeral designations:

I ii iii IV V vi VII
C D E F G A B

I didn't include the minor designations after D, E and A, since we're interested in making a chord. Remember that I said the formula for making any major chord is I, iii, V? Look at those notes and tell me which notes those are. Did you say C, E and G? You're right. When you play a C major chord, you're only playing a C, E and G, even if you're playing a barre chord and have all 6 strings being played. Check it out for yourself. Now then, let's say we need an F major chord. We can use this same scale to figure out which notes it has. Start on the F and skip 1. We have an A. Start on the A and skip another. Now we have a C. The F major chord should have an F, A and C in it. It sure does. Cool, eh? How about a C minor chord? What makes it minor? That's an easy one. The minor chord has a flatted 3rd degree, or biii. That means it should have the notes C, Eb and G. If we play those notes, we have our Cm. You'll notice I said Eb instead of saying D#. Why? Because each note must be named in our scale. If I said C, D# and G it's technically correct, but then we end up with a scale progression of C, D, D#, F, G, A, B. See what happened? We ended up with D being named twice and skipped E. Each note must be used once and once only. We could actually create another scale, one that has Eb in it, and build our minor chord that way, but I really want to keep this simple and not overload you.

Again, if you have any questions, just drop me a PM.


MY GOD thank you for this chord construction is the only basic( i guess i could say that probable a better way to put it) thing i still have trouble with that cleared ALOT of stuff about thanks. and again might pm you some other questions