#1
so I was listening to The Beatle's Let it Be solo (the album version) on guitar pro and noticed all the notes were in the key of C major. My question is this: does the solo sound in key (or any solo in general) because the key signature of the song is C major and the notes are all in that key, or do you have to look at each chord your playing over? would any notes in C major sound good?

thanks
#2
Well in most songs, like Let it Be, the chords are made up of the notes in the C major scale anyway, so a solo will sound best when the notes from the piece's key (here, C major) are played. Its only really in more complex pieces (such as jazz), where more unusual chords and progressions are used where you'd begin to use notes based on the current chord, as the notes within these chords may not come under the piece's key signature.
#3
Quote by J C
Well in most songs, like Let it Be, the chords are made up of the notes in the C major scale anyway, so a solo will sound best when the notes from the piece's key (here, C major) are played. Its only really in more complex pieces (such as jazz), where more unusual chords and progressions are used where you'd begin to use notes based on the current chord, as the notes within these chords may not come under the piece's key signature.

so why doesn't it sound as good if I use other notes in the solo from the key of C major?
#4
Quote by beatles34
so why doesn't it sound as good if I use other notes in the solo from the key of C major?

try the c minor pentatonic, or just c major, it should sound fine if its in the key of c.
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#5
any of the notes in C major will sound okay in theory, but you will find that some sound better than others at certain points of the progression. it will depend largely on context, meaning what chord you are specifically playing over, as well as what notes you just played in your solo, must be considered. long story short, you may find that, for example, playing the 2nd note of the scale as the leading tone in your solo might just sound like a mistake, since you'd basically be playing a big fat D note over a C chord... see what i mean?

you should try to avoid starting on, ending on, or focusing on notes that sound unpleasant over the chord changes. that doesn't mean you can't use certain notes, just be sure to use them in the right context, like as passing notes or just as part of a more complex line that starts and ends on stronger notes.
#6
Quote by beatles34
so why doesn't it sound as good if I use other notes in the solo from the key of C major?

Because you can't just play random notes and expect it to sound good, you need to take the chords you're playing over into account. Certain scale degrees, the notes of a scale, are more consonant than others withing the scale structure, that means they resolve better and sound more "right". How consonant they are is also dependent on the particular chord you're playing over within the key...following on from what frigginjerk said if you ry to resolve to, for example, an F note whilst playing over the Em chord your playing a minor 2nd which is going to jar horribly, and that goes for all the chords - if a note isn't in the chord or doesn't complement its notes then you need to be very careful how you use it.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
Because you can't just play random notes and expect it to sound good, you need to take the chords you're playing over into account. Certain scale degrees, the notes of a scale, are more consonant than others withing the scale structure, that means they resolve better and sound more "right". How consonant they are is also dependent on the particular chord you're playing over within the key...following on from what frigginjerk said if you ry to resolve to, for example, an F note whilst playing over the Em chord your playing a minor 2nd which is going to jar horribly, and that goes for all the chords - if a note isn't in the chord or doesn't complement its notes then you need to be very careful how you use it.

so instead should I look from the notes in the chord I'm playing over, rather then the key?
#8
Quote by mick13
so instead should I look from the notes in the chord I'm playing over, rather then the key?

they're saying that in theory you could solo entirely in C-major but you need to realize that just becuase each note theoretically works, that doesn't mean that it will sound particularly good.
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#10
Quote by mick13
so instead should I look from the notes in the chord I'm playing over, rather then the key?

The key will point you in the direction of a scale which gives you a group of notes you can use, however the individual chords within that key are what you need to consider when choosing which of those notes to use.
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#11
IIRC the solo in Let It Be is C major pentatonic. So no F or B notes to be found in that solo. (Altho I'm doing this from memory so I could be wrong).

The major pentatonic scale is more commonly used in rock then the plain old major scale.
#12
Quote by Cammeh
You could try its minor relative, but i don't know what that is.


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#13
Quote by Cammeh
You could try its minor relative, but i don't know what that is.

relative minor of C major is A Minor
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If we did tune using the 5th fret on the G string it'd be a C. At the moment it goes G B which stands for George Bush. So obviously GB doesn't want you to C the truth! To the conspiracy cave!