#1
I recently picked up an Ibanez bass a little over 2 months ago after playing guitar for about a year and a half. I have a 20W amp and a Boss Overdrive pedal. I enjoy playing the bass a lot more than guitar, but am having a little trouble practicing. I should tell you now that I play metal. I learned one scale and that's about it. I play for a little bit and then get bored. I know I should learn the scales and all the theory behind it, but I don't really want to. My question is will learning theory make the bass more fun when I play alone(I don't play with my band everyday)? Also is there something I can buy to get a jam-along function?

Thank you and any other practice tips will help me out greatly!
#3
Teach yourself all of the notes ALL over the fretboard, then, get chord sheets, and listen to the songs, playing to chords or root notes with them. And when you learn scales, don't even bother looking at the shape or pattern of them, learn the notes within the scale. Trust me on that one, I wish I NEVER looked at the shape. I now have to unlearn everything.
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#4
learning and practicing theory won't necessarily make your isolated practice exceptionally thrilling. what it will do is raise you to the next level when you're playing with your band. the reward is being more capable to expand on musical ideas and be able to work together easily with other musicians.
^^not necessarily helpful.
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Pete Wentz sig reaches level 32, it evolves into Mark Hoppus bass.
Mark Hoppus bass uses tone knob!
it's super unneffective!
#5
Quote by Cody_Grey102
Teach yourself all of the notes ALL over the fretboard, then, get chord sheets, and listen to the songs, playing to chords or root notes with them. And when you learn scales, don't even bother looking at the shape or pattern of them, learn the notes within the scale. Trust me on that one, I wish I NEVER looked at the shape. I now have to unlearn everything.


Cant you just relearn the scales, by memorizing the notes of the pattern?
it would be easier
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#6
Quote by The_Hammer2112
Cant you just relearn the scales, by memorizing the notes of the pattern?
it would be easier


He's saying, that when you learn all the notes on the fretboard, you wont need to memorize the pattern, if you know the notes you'll instantly know the shape.
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#7
Ok, so I learned two more scales and all the notes on the first octave and am starting to see how the notes in the scales relate to eachother. But I have one more question, how do I incorporate these notes into riffs that sound good with the rest of the band? I usually just play the same notes the guitarist is playing except for plam mutes and it sounds good, but I want to expand my bass lines to put a bigger emphasis on the song in general.
#8
the best thing to do is just start trying other stuff. with theory, you can experiment with actual method and direction. what you can start doing is identifying the tonality of the song you're playing with the band and experiment with other scale tones in that key. if you're not too familiar with key signatures, start by learning there.
^^not necessarily helpful.
Quote by the humanity

think pokemon
Pete Wentz sig reaches level 32, it evolves into Mark Hoppus bass.
Mark Hoppus bass uses tone knob!
it's super unneffective!
#10
I don't only play metal, I enjoy most genres of music, but it's just that my band plays metal. Thanks everyone for helping me out.
#11
Quote by Cody_Grey102
Teach yourself all of the notes ALL over the fretboard, then, get chord sheets, and listen to the songs, playing to chords or root notes with them. And when you learn scales, don't even bother looking at the shape or pattern of them, learn the notes within the scale. Trust me on that one, I wish I NEVER looked at the shape. I now have to unlearn everything.


The trouble is that you should see the shape almost instantly anyway. I mean, after I was first shown the F major scale, I asked if I was playing G major right. Just shifted everything up a step.
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+1