#1
Whats the fingering for a a minor 7 flat 5 with a e flat in the bass and , d minor 7 flat 5 with a flat in the bass, also, e7 sharp five Thanks.
#2
If you know your chord formulas and the notes on the fret board, you'll be able to work them out yourself.
#3
Learn how intervals, and major and minor scales work. Then you'll be able to figure out the notes of each of these chords. Then, if you know your notes on the fretboard, you should be able to figure out these chords pretty quickly. You will find there are many different positions and shapes in which these chords can be played in.
#4
yeah i figured them out, but they dont sound jazzy just like a reg a minor dosent sound like jazz a minor i forget which notes i add
#5
Ami7b5 could also be F9 (no root) or a Cmi6 or a B7b9#5 (no root)...there are four close voices inversions for this form on each set of four strings so you have 12 voicings for each form...add wide intervals and your possibilities increase so you have many possibilities...

do an intense study of the inversions of all chords...its alot of work but worth the effort and the harmonic and melodic doors that open will be priceless in your jazz studies..

one form of the Ami7b5 with Eb in the bass is

Fret 5 6 7 8
Note C Eb A G

this voicing may require some getting used to..depending on how it is used in a progression...there are other voicings that may be more pleasing to the ear..experiment

play well

wolf
#6
Quote by wuffwuffwuffy
yeah i figured them out, but they dont sound jazzy just like a reg a minor dosent sound like jazz a minor i forget which notes i add



It's all about context. A chord on it's own isn't necessarily going to sound "jazzy".


Quote by mdc
If you know your chord formulas and the notes on the fret board, you'll be able to work them out yourself.


+ 1 Ultimately this is what your going to have to do.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by wolflen

Fret 5 6 7 8
Note C Eb A G

this voicing may require some getting used to..depending on how it is used in a progression...there are other voicings that may be more pleasing to the ear..experiment


that chord only has 2 different tones.
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
#8
If you don't know how to form those chords (and, indeed, if you think there are sych things as "jazz chords", then you aren't ready to be playing jazz. Find yourself a teacher and pickup a good textbook on the subject.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
It's all about context. A chord on it's own isn't necessarily going to sound "jazzy".


this. major +1

the easiest way to do those chords would be to make a barre chord of the non-altered chord, and start altering it... ie: make an E minor chord at your seventh fret, A string:

e|-7-
b|-8-
g|-9-
d|-9-
A|-7-

then make it a minor seventh:

e|-7-
b|-8-
g|-7-
d|-9-
A|-7-

then make the fifth flat too:

e|-7-
b|-8-
g|-7-
d|-8-
A|-7-

I would finger that chord by using my index finger for the bass note, and barre it so that you get the high note and the g string as well. middle finger on the D string, ring finger on the B string. use the same pattern for your other chords.

there are other ways to grip any chord, but forming them off of barre chords is a pretty easy trick.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Jan 2, 2009,