#1
Out of curiousity, what exactly do these things do? I'm assuming you control how far up or down you want to shift pitch, but are they exact? In other words, if I tune my guitar to standard and shift one whole step down, will the 6th string be a perfect D, or will it be off?

Also, how far do they typically go? I don't know any specific models, so if anyone could refer one to me that would help. But if it goes more than an octave, you can also use a pitch shifter like an octave pedal, can't you?


The reason I'm asking is that I had a crazy idea. Double locking floating trems certainly have their advantages, but one of the major disadvantages is that you can't change tunings quickly. So could you use a pitch shifter with a guitar in standard tuning to drop it a full step, or more? Obviously, you couldn't drop one string by itself, but wouldn't it be effective for tuning the whole guitar down?
#2
some pitch shifters go 2 octaves(whammy), but they dont like chords, single notes are all right though
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#3
It depends on which shifter you get.

I own a Digitech Whammy [IV], and it isn't that bad. It's just that chords are a bit of a problem. Some people also whine about the tone-suck, but again, it's not that bad. You'll find that the majority of the people on this board that say that, don't even own one. Or they tried it in a store with gear different than their own.

I really wouldn't recommend using the Whammy for what you had in mind, but Buckethead used his for awhile to play a live version of Nottingham Lace, and it doesn't sound that bad. I can't figure out if he used a Whammy II or IV though, probably a II. Which does sound different. It's also the one I'd recommend getting, although you'll have to get it used and it'll likely be more expensive than a new IV.
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#4
please, please, please don't use a pitch shifter in place of a tuner.

take the time and do it properly.


by the way, it's not a crazy idea, lots of people think of it and are thouroughly disappointed.

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#5
the pog (polyphonic octave generator, polyphonic means multiple notes) can do entire chords.
the Hog (polyphonic harmonic generaror) actually can be used with an expression pedal.
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#6
Thanks for the help. I'm not getting any of these anytime soon, it was just a thought.

No, a whammy isn't really what I had in mind - I had this in mind for a guitar with an LFR/OFR that makes it difficult to change tunings, and you can whammy on those without a pedal. I dunno why exactly a whammy pedal also let's you shift the pitch octaves, whether it's just an extra feature or like that on all whammy pedals.
#7
Quote by tigerking615
Thanks for the help. I'm not getting any of these anytime soon, it was just a thought.

No, a whammy isn't really what I had in mind - I had this in mind for a guitar with an LFR/OFR that makes it difficult to change tunings, and you can whammy on those without a pedal. I dunno why exactly a whammy pedal also let's you shift the pitch octaves, whether it's just an extra feature or like that on all whammy pedals.


The Digitech Whammy is supposed to be a tremolo bar on steroids in pedal form, not a replacement for a Floyd. For instance, a Floyd can't go up or down two octaves, and it's hard to flutter on a whammy. Pitch shifting (in terms of a whole or half step) is possible, but difficult and requires some precise adjustment of the treadle.
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Last edited by Raijouta at Jan 2, 2009,