#1
How do you figure out what power chord is what chord? If you play an A5 power chord is that the same as an a chord?
#2
No. A power chord is not a real chord, a chord technically requires at least 3 notes. A5 is not the same as an A, although similar.
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#3
It's not the same, but if you play an A5 then it is one of the many A chords, likewise with B, C, D, E, F and G.
Quote by krims0n
No. A power chord is not a real chord, a chord technically requires at least 3 notes. A5 is not the same as an A, although similar.

i'm pretty sure power chords do have 3 notes? For instance A5 =


|e||------------|
|B||------------|
|G||------------|
|D||------7-----|
|A||------7-----|
|E||------5-----|


No?
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Last edited by Yngwi3 at Jan 2, 2009,
#4
It's a fake chord. You need the third of the chord in order to make it minor, major, dimished, or augmented.
#5
what about a suspended? That only needs a 1 4 and 5 doesn't it? Not that I know much, though I'm still kind of new.
#6
I know theyre not the same as real chords or classical or whatever. thats what Im asking. How would for examble take a song thats for power chords and then turn it into a song with real chords? You know like if I took lets say blitzkreig bop and tried to play a acoustic style without using the power chords? Someone said I need the third of the chord to make it minor, najor, ect. What exactly does that mean and how do I do it? How do I figure out what power chords are what "real" chords or whatever is what Im asking. This kinda seemed answered already but sine the A5 isnt the same as an a chord but one of many how do I know which one? or does it matter according to what key youre playing in?
#7
Quote by Yngwi3
i'm pretty sure power chords do have 3 notes?

Nope. Pay attention to what notes you are actually playing in a power chord. Their is a root & a 5th. The 3rd string is just the root again played an octave higher.
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#8
Quote by Yngwi3
It's not the same, but if you play an A5 then it is one of the many A chords, likewise with B, C, D, E, F and G.

i'm pretty sure power chords do have 3 notes? For instance A5 =


|e||------------|
|B||------------|
|G||------------|
|D||------7-----|
|A||------7-----|
|E||------5-----|


No?

That's two notes and an octave.
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#11
Quote by FlyingSorcerer
I know theyre not the same as real chords or classical or whatever. thats what Im asking. How would for examble take a song thats for power chords and then turn it into a song with real chords? You know like if I took lets say blitzkreig bop and tried to play a acoustic style without using the power chords? Someone said I need the third of the chord to make it minor, najor, ect. What exactly does that mean and how do I do it? How do I figure out what power chords are what "real" chords or whatever is what Im asking. This kinda seemed answered already but sine the A5 isnt the same as an a chord but one of many how do I know which one? or does it matter according to what key youre playing in?



It has to do with whatever key the song is in. That is determined by what notes are in the power chords* that you are playing. It takes more than one power chord to determine a key. All the combined notes of the power chords give you the key of a song.

Blitzkrieg Bop is made up of an A5 power chord, D5 power chord, and an E5 power chord.

The A5 has A and E; the D5 has D and A and the E5 has E and B.

So we A, B, D and E. Now we look at what keys have those notes in them.

Lots of keys have those notes in them but something you want to do when your determining the key of a song is figure out what chord has the strongest feel, or resolution. The one chord that everything seems to come back to. In this case its the A5. The song begins and ends on the A5 power chord. Also the chord progression of the song is a standard I-IV-V in the key of A major, so we can safely say that this song is in A major.
#12
Quote by hendrixism
what about a suspended? That only needs a 1 4 and 5 doesn't it? Not that I know much, though I'm still kind of new.



it's called suspended cause you "suspend" the 3rd and play the 4th instead

the only thing you need to call it a chord (not a power chord) is a triad, which is 3 different notes
#13
Quote by FlyingSorcerer
How do you figure out what power chord is what chord? If you play an A5 power chord is that the same as an a chord?

You don't, you do it the other way round....take a chord, remove the 3rd and hey presto, you've got a powerchord.

The reason you don't do it the other way round is because a powerchord progression is generally taken from the corresponding major or minor key. The chords of that key will contain major, minor and possibly diminished chords. That means if you're just presented with some powerchords it may not be possible to definitely identify the related key which means you won't know what those powerchords originally would have been.
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#14
Incidentally, no matter what you do, a song made up of power chords isn't really going to sound the same if you make them into full chords. There's also no reason you can't play power chords on an acoustic.

And as people have said there's no simple way to determine what the 'correct' full chord to replace each power chord with would be in most (all?) cases.
#15
a powerchord is kind of a dead tone, sounds great when adding some gain, but really its what comes AFTER the 5th that gives a chord its identity
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#16
Quote by TSelman
Those are triads, not chords.




triads are chords..
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#17
Quote by Yngwi3
It's not the same, but if you play an A5 then it is one of the many A chords, likewise with B, C, D, E, F and G.

i'm pretty sure power chords do have 3 notes? For instance A5 =


|e||------------|
|B||------------|
|G||------------|
|D||------7-----|
|A||------7-----|
|E||------5-----|


No?



5th Fret E and 7th Fret D are both A, just not the same octave...

Power chords are simply the root note and a fifth

Major chords are just the root note, the major third and perfect fifth

A5 powerchord = A E A
Amaj = A C# E


so they aren't exactly the same and a powerchord is usually not considered a triad