#1
Where can I start learning the notes on the fretboard ? I'm looking for something that I can print out nd is really simple. Thanks.
#3
In my experience you learn a lot more by drawing it out yourself or learning patterns of the major scale.

I have a wall chart of the fretboard, complete with a few of the major scale box shapes. When writing solos I tend to look at it instead of my hands.
#4
Thanks man. I got a question though. you know how there's more than 1 E on the fretboard? Are they all the same note or do they have different names like E# or something?
#5
The octaves have numbers. I believe the low E is an E2 and the high E is an E0. I would prefer somebody else to confirm it but you get the idea. Octaves begin on a C.
#6
They are called the same note, because once you go through all the notes up to G, you restart because the notes on fretboard go like this: A B C D E F G A

Then you just keep repeating... There are sharps and flats to some notes in there too but it gets complicated so your going to want to read a guide. Check out the lessons on this site, theres some good info.

Sorry if I didn't explain it well. >.<
#7
Thanks for the helpful replies! haha I sort of understand it but I'll check out the lessons like you said.
#8
One thing that's very helpful is to learn the relationships between the notes on the different strings. It cuts the amount of learning in half, at least.

Ok, take the low E string. Starting from the open position:

E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# and by the 12th fret it has reached E again, and the cycle repeats.

Now look at the 4th string, the D string.
D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C#

Notice that on the E string, the open note is an E, but on the D string, there is an E (one octave higher), that is two frets up. The notes are the same, 1 octave apart, and two frets higher on the D.

On the B string (2nd), the notes are the same as the 4th string, except 3 frets higher, and again one octave higher in pitch.

The same relationship as exists between the 6th, 4th and 2nd strings, exists between the 5th, 3rd and 1st string (which also happens to be exactly the same as the low E, except 2 octaves higher). The 5th string starts on an A.

Learning these relationships really, really helped me learn the fretboard faster.
#9
Quote by se012101
One thing that's very helpful is to learn the relationships between the notes on the different strings. It cuts the amount of learning in half, at least.



This. As soon as you get familiar with the chromatic scale on one or two strings it becomes so much easier to learn it on the others.