#1
I'm not sure if this is on the right forum so point me in the right direction if it isn't.

Question: Is it common for artists now-days to have gone through Uni and gotten some degree in Music/Performance? I've been beginning to practice but i'm not sure if one of the essential parts of being recognised is having some kind of qualification to back you up.

I could understand this being the case for a violinist wanting to get into a symphony orchestra but i'm talking more along the lines of a singer/pianist. Any help on this is appreciated.
#2
To me it seems like they all act like they have just to endorse somebody
#3
Elton John.
Piano legend.
Formal training.

Ben Folds.
Piano legend.
No formal training.

Wolfgang Mozart.
Piano legend.
Formal training.

Ludwig Beethoven.
Piano legend.
Limited training.


You be the judge.
#4
It's not even remotely common. Dream Theater, as an example, dropped out of music college to play music.

It's just one of those things where experience is a better teacher. It's because with experience you develop your own style and become your own artist. With formal training it's all the same stuff.
#6
So i suppose then as long as you're a good musician, and the people signing you like you and so on there's no real need for a degree or anything
Known.
Some.
Call.
Is.
Air.
Am?

Now though, I realise what i should have said - in the spirit of the dark; in the spirit of the staircase -
"Known some call is air am."
Which is to say-

"I am not what i used to be"
#7
That's right.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
It depends on what you want to do. If you want to be a pop star, a degree in music probably won't be essential. If you want to make a career playing in jazz or classical, then yes, a university degree would help you greatly. Keep in mind, there are many more gigs in those genres than in the pop world.
#9
Quote by koslack
It depends on what you want to do. If you want to be a pop star, a degree in music probably won't be essential. If you want to make a career playing in jazz or classical, then yes, a university degree would help you greatly. Keep in mind, there are many more gigs in those genres than in the pop world.


+1

It doesn't take years of music training to play something by Hannah Montana.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc

Hi 5 man! this is what Im talkin bout!


Rig:
05' B.C. Rich Warlock
Line 6 Spide III 75 Watt Combo
Behringer Cry Babe
Digitech Death Metal
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Rodam Cables
D'aDarrio XL
Chain for a strap
#10
I want to go to music school to meet other musicians and fine tune and perfect my craft, and make connections with other players for future help. Hang out with those MPE guys and they'll give you free recording later on
#11
I'm thinking more along the lines of Pianist/Singer, so perhaps something of a few short courses would help. I won't go for Jazz/Classical, although it is an option. Lol i just want a few pub gigs to start with, that doesn't take a qualification...
Known.
Some.
Call.
Is.
Air.
Am?

Now though, I realise what i should have said - in the spirit of the dark; in the spirit of the staircase -
"Known some call is air am."
Which is to say-

"I am not what i used to be"
#12
Quote by LJonesy
I'm thinking more along the lines of Pianist/Singer, so perhaps something of a few short courses would help. I won't go for Jazz/Classical, although it is an option. Lol i just want a few pub gigs to start with, that doesn't take a qualification...


Experience doesn't speak for itself. If you want to book gigs you have to get your music out there.

Degrees however, say that you're trained and know what you're doing.

Consider what you want to do, then consider the fastest way to it. Ultimately degrees and qualifications mean training, which is never a bad thing. Learning something about playing music is always useful if you want to play music.
#13
Quote by kyle62
Not a chance in hell. Record labels don't give a crap about who you are, as long as your music and image is a product they think people will actually buy....



what???

I always thought that record labels would want someone who is coming from a decent lifesytle.

After all, they are investing time and money into you. It would be a shame to lose out on someone who had to get locked up in a bubble room.
bro0otal

Drummer



Guitarist___________Bassist________________Vox______________________Lead Guitarist
______________________________________________________
#14
If you're looking to make a living from playing music, you could do a lot worse than to get some kind of recognised accreditation from somewhere. Being able to say that you have a music degree, and that you're a formally trained musician might be the difference between you getting a session gig or losing it to someone else.

Is it essential? No, probably not. But chances are, it'll broaden your horizons musically and maybe open some doors for you. The pro's of doing something like this probably outweight the cons, but you'd have to be willing to sacrifice the time to do it.

Then again, for getting a few pub gigs, I'd say you'd be fine with a decent repertoire and a modest amount of talent.
#15
Quote by Banana Man
what???

I always thought that record labels would want someone who is coming from a decent lifesytle.

After all, they are investing time and money into you. It would be a shame to lose out on someone who had to get locked up in a bubble room.


Nope, it's all just product. Sometimes they'll intentionally scout out someone from a specific background to appeal to a wider audience.

For example, you don't think Avril Lavigne got a contract based purely on singing ability, do you? The big marketing executives will work out that the label could benefit from, say, 'a raw, edgy character that'll appeal to alternative teenage girls' and then go out and find someone who fits the bill, and can sing reasonably well. In these days of pro tools and autotune, the talent itself doesn't even have to be top-notch; that can be 'fixed in the mix'.


Of course, for most highbrow and instrumental styles like jazz and classical, the rules are vastly different.
#16
I suppose i'm fortunate here, because i've had to commit myself to getting some sort of qualification anyway. But for personal reasons i will have to go into a different course other than music. A double degree would fix that, which is possible, or perhaps something in the lines of Bachelor of Arts could accommodate both in the one... hm...

Getting a degree wouldn't be a bad idea in the sense that it's extra time to practice and do local gigs
Known.
Some.
Call.
Is.
Air.
Am?

Now though, I realise what i should have said - in the spirit of the dark; in the spirit of the staircase -
"Known some call is air am."
Which is to say-

"I am not what i used to be"