#1
Hey,

I'm just wondering how set necks are better or worse than bolt necks? I also heard that bolt necks loosen in time. is that true?

Thanks
#2
proly but u can just tighten them up
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#3
set neck generally have better sustain

but i prefer bolt ons

b/c they generally come unfinished and i think unfinished necks are faster
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#4
Back in the old days, the bolt-on necks were pretty crappy. They were improperly fitted on the guitar and tone would suffer, among other things. That's pretty much a thing of the past. The nice thing about a bolt-on, is that if you ever need to replace the neck, it's an easy affair. A set neck can be replaced, but it's more of a hassle. I've never heard of bolt-ons getting loose over time. That's a new one to me.
#5
Quote by justlivin
set neck generally have better sustain

but i prefer bolt ons

b/c they generally come unfinished and i think unfinished necks are faster


I've noticed that too.

Set necks do have better sustain because it's all one piece.

I don't mind either one.

Bolt-necks shouldn't loosen, the screws are about 2 inches long.
#6
i prefer a set neck for studio stuff, but if your doing any gigs or really taking your guitar anyone besides your house i only use a bolt on.


i dont like risking my set necks getting damaged, call me paranoid if you want.
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#7
Quote by conor1148
i prefer a set neck for studio stuff, but if your doing any gigs or really taking your guitar anyone besides your house i only use a bolt on.


i dont like risking my set necks getting damaged, call me paranoid if you want.
I've heard gibson necks are poorly designed and break easy. Haven't heard of problems of set necks with other brands
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#8
very few set necks actually break unless ur trying cause that glue is tough lol. bolt ons are more likely to break what with tearing the wood out of the body and stuff. and when it comes to sustain a good bolt on can sound just as good as a set neck not to mention the convenience in maintenance and neck replacement. but then again u shouldn't have to replace the neck on a good set neck or bolt on.
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#9
Quote by mitch311
I've heard gibson necks are poorly designed and break easy. Haven't heard of problems of set necks with other brands


just the thought disturbs me though, im paranoid.
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#10
Neither is "better". Each has a different type of sound. A bolt-on is more functional and delivers more sustain, but has a brighter sound(take that as a pro or con depending on your tone) and is more prone to crapsmanship(if they do a switch from bolt-on necks to a set-neck in their line, their at the point where crapsmanship won't be tolerated except for an occasional lemon), and improper bolting from crapsmanship can yield zero sustain, while a set-neck is more stable and has a cleaner transfer of sound, but slightly less sustain and is a bitch to fix if broken(though not as much as neck-thru).

So yeah, it depends on what you want. Neither is better than the other though.
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#11
Quote by conor1148
just the thought disturbs me though, im paranoid.


Its like me and my paranoia every since I heard that edge trems can go out over time
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#12
Quote by TSelman
I've noticed that too.

Set necks do have better sustain because it's all one piece.

I don't mind either one.

Bolt-necks shouldn't loosen, the screws are about 2 inches long.


Actually, they've done studies and there's a very minimal difference. If the bolt on is done really well, they can actually sustain a fraction more than set necks.
It's all preference really. Some bolt ons have annoying upper fret access, because of the neck joint but then others, like ibanez for example, have a pretty good neck joint, which actually has good upper fret access.
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#13
Fact: bolt on necks sustain better than set necks... provided the bolt on is TIGHT. Like, I can't fit a .50mm pick in the neck joint, tight.
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#14
Quote by oneblackened
Fact: bolt on necks sustain better than set necks... provided the bolt on is TIGHT. Like, I can't fit a .50mm pick in the neck joint, tight.


There is usually a rubber pad between the neck and body, rubber won't hold vibrations like the rest of wood. It ruins it.
#15
Quote by TSelman
There is usually a rubber pad between the neck and body, rubber won't hold vibrations like the rest of wood. It ruins it.

Well that's news to me, because I've NEVER seen that before.

I don't think usually is a good word there. Occasionally, sometimes, but not usually.
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#16
Quote by TSelman
There is usually a rubber pad between the neck and body, rubber won't hold vibrations like the rest of wood. It ruins it.

Where did you get that from?

I have a starcaster (cheap indonesian strat copy licensed by fender, made in indonesia) that's a bolt on and doesn't have this "rubber pad". I took it apart, so don't think i dont know.

I also have a peavey wolfgang. Another bolt-on neck. No rubber pad.
#17
Sustain differences are utterly negligible in relation to different neck constructions.

Les Pauls do generally sustain better than Strats and the like, but's that's got nothing to do with being a set-neck and everything to do with being a nine-pound chunk of mahogony and maple.

Tonal differences, now? Hm. I could buy that.
#18
Quote by TSelman
There is usually a rubber pad between the neck and body, rubber won't hold vibrations like the rest of wood. It ruins it.


Complete and utter bullsh*t. There IS sometimes a rubber pad in between the body and neck plate so it doesn't scratch the body maybe thats what you got mixed up but no way in hell is there one in between the neck heel and neck pocket sorry.
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#19
Quote by TSelman
There is usually a rubber pad between the neck and body, rubber won't hold vibrations like the rest of wood. It ruins it.


Your an idiot. Have you ever looked at a bolt-on neck joint before?
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#20
Quote by necrosis1193
Your an idiot. Have you ever looked at a bolt-on neck joint before?


Yes, my first guitar was a bolt on, took that apart. I've built guitars before. I know what I'm talking about.

There's screws that go into a metal plate, that go through a rubber pad, that go through the body, and into the neck joint. The rubber disrupts vibrations.

Yes, I did mix up the position of the rubber, but it's still there, and it still doesn't do anything for the sustain.
#21
Quote by TSelman
Yes, my first guitar was a bolt on, took that apart. I've built guitars before. I know what I'm talking about.

There's screws that go into a metal plate, that go through a rubber pad, that go through the body, and into the neck joint. The rubber disrupts vibrations.

Yes, I did mix up the position of the rubber, but it's still there, and it still doesn't do anything for the sustain.


Yes, well, as I've taken apart two strat copies and had my uncle do so to make sure every last detail was in order with my Fender, I'd have to say you got a bad guitar.
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#22
Quote by necrosis1193
Yes, well, as I've taken apart two strat copies and had my uncle do so to make sure every last detail was in order with my Fender, I'd have to say you got a bad guitar.


It was an Ibanez Starter, of course it was bad hahaha
#23
Quote by TSelman
Yes, my first guitar was a bolt on, took that apart. I've built guitars before. I know what I'm talking about.

There's screws that go into a metal plate, that go through a rubber pad, that go through the body, and into the neck joint. The rubber disrupts vibrations.

Yes, I did mix up the position of the rubber, but it's still there, and it still doesn't do anything for the sustain.


read what I wrote a few posts up. That rubber pad does not 'disrupt vibration' the transfer occurs where the contact is between the neck heel and neck pocket on the body WHICH IS ALWAYS BARE WOOD. If you really do built guitars you should know that the littler rubber pad in between the neck plate and body doesn't do anything bad but instead protects the finish from scratches
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#24
Quote by TSelman
Yes, my first guitar was a bolt on, took that apart. I've built guitars before. I know what I'm talking about.

There's screws that go into a metal plate, that go through a rubber pad, that go through the body, and into the neck joint. The rubber disrupts vibrations.

Yes, I did mix up the position of the rubber, but it's still there, and it still doesn't do anything for the sustain.

The only thing the rubber pad would be doing is:
A) Preventing the finish under the plate from being scratched and digging into the neck heel joint (which i suppose could, under extreme circumstances, crack the finish or possibly the wood).
B) Causing less transfer to the little metal plate that isn't at a transfer joint between two pieces of wood.

Therefore, that little rubber pad isn't hurting anything, in fact it's helping protect the guitar.
#27
Quote by Pac_man0123
>_<

Curse me and taking time to make a well thought-out and organized post that goes into more detail.


naa its cool, was just kidding around
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