#1
My band is just starting out and everything and we are starting to get some songs together. We are really wanting to put them up on myspace and such, but we are basically broke. I was wondering if anyone knows of any recording interface for my computer and mic that would be a good quility product to start out with? I'm thinking a price under 200 US dollers.
Last edited by espltdm100fm88 at Jan 7, 2009,
#3
uh. that's not going to help him much if he's planning on recording an entire band.

TS, you're not going to need alot to record half decent guitars, bass, and vocals, or whatever else you may need. the only problem is recording drums. i recommend trying to get some sort of a decent drum machine, and record with that. because depending how well done the software is, it'll probably sound better than a crappy, airy, reverb filled drum track you would get from recording with one mic.
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#4
Quote by ugmung
uh. that's not going to help him much if he's planning on recording an entire band.

TS, you're not going to need alot to record half decent guitars, bass, and vocals, or whatever else you may need. the only problem is recording drums. i recommend trying to get some sort of a decent drum machine, and record with that. because depending how well done the software is, it'll probably sound better than a crappy, airy, reverb filled drum track you would get from recording with one mic.

I don't know much about a drum machine, how much do those cost?? cause if they aren't too much i think im gona try to get a cheaper usb interface and record guitar, bass, and vocals through that and then buy a drum machine.
#5
a mixer with enough inputs with a usb connection and maybe a trial of adobe aduition or adaucity
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#6
I suggest you put as much time as possible into learning how to record and mix first, or you'll be wasting every penny. Here's how I'd do it:


  • Download demo versions of all the major software DAWs (Cubase, Sonar, etc), and also the free software Reaper and Ardour. Then mess around for a while to try and learn the basics. Once you you've found a preference and have some basic recording skill, you should be able to get a cheap, stripped down version for around $100 (eg Cubasis Vst, Sonar Home Studio). Sometimes audio interfaces will come with one of these included, so you can kill two birds with one stone.

  • For drums, you can download the free Mydrumset virtual instrument and use MIDI to sequence the drum tracks - this way you can mix them properly and edit to your heart's content, with a better sound than any budget hardware drum machine.

  • You'll need at least one mic, preferably two. Get a USB condenser mic like the Samson C01U for vocals, acoustic guitar and whatever else, and if there's any money left over you can maybe get a dynamic mic+preamp for guitar amps.

  • For guitar/bass, there are two choices. You can use an audio interface (or just the Line In jack if you're really skint) to plug the guitar into the computer, then use virtual amps/effects to make it sound half-decent. Or you can do it the typical way and mic up your amps. It depends how good your amps/mics are, and whether you've got somewhere you can crank them up. I personally prefer the 'silent' way of using software guitar amps, but it depends on your circumstances.

  • You need decent monitor speakers, or your recordings will sound totally different everywhere they're played. However good monitors are way outside your budget, so I suggest using good-quality computer speakers and a good pair of headphones for reference. At the moment I get by using 'Diamond' PC speakers, and a pair of Sennheiser HD497 headphones. The Sennheisers give me a reasonable indication of the frequencies, while the mid-heavy speakers are fine for rough mixing and getting the stereo image right. you can mix on any speakers, provided you take the time to learn exactly what frequencies they emphasise and which ones they mask. The speaker/headphone route is the best way of doing it on a bidget, and I usually get good results. Expect to spend upwards of $50 on 'phones. Here's a great little guide on Amazon.


There's loads of great internet resources on home recording for a deeper look, try websites and free forums like Recording Review and Sound On Sound.

Best of luck
Last edited by kyle62 at Jan 3, 2009,