#1
I think this belongs seeing as how this does in fact relate to bass, but my question is really, how would I go about becoming a session bassist? What would be a good road to take? I am planning on attending college next year or the year after, and I am going to take as many music theory courses as possible, I know some basic music theory and such, or at least it is basic in my eyes. I know that session musicians need to be incredible versatile and able to play many styles of music, which I am trying to learn, but I was just wondering if any of you had suggestions for my achieving my current career choice?

I know I need to update my rig too, right now it is a Squier VM Fretless Jazz Bass, a P.A. head, and a spectra cab. I know pathetic. Anyways... Pretty much anything that you can think of to help me. You can always learn something.

Thanks much.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#2
Get networking skills.

Music is, IMO:
50 percent "Talent"
50 percent "Knowing the Right People"
Last edited by Captain Insano at Jan 3, 2009,
#3
Quote by JF-SH1
I think this belongs seeing as how this does in fact relate to bass, but my question is really, how would I go about becoming a session bassist? What would be a good road to take? I am planning on attending college next year or the year after, and I am going to take as many music theory courses as possible, I know some basic music theory and such, or at least it is basic in my eyes. I know that session musicians need to be incredible versatile and able to play many styles of music, which I am trying to learn, but I was just wondering if any of you had suggestions for my achieving my current career choice?


Good job, take as many theory classes as you can. Then after that, take more. Work on perfecting every technique possible. There's more but that's all I can think of right now.
#4
Know how to improvise. Along with all of that mentioned above, song producers will often ask you to give a certain sound with your playing. I don't know if I remember correctly, but in an interview with guitarworld, a session musician said that he encountered such a situation; a producer asked him to "play something like the killer's Mr. Brightside." Know how to give hooks in your bassline, make it catchy. Bands like Steely Dan can often cycle through session musicians looking for the right sound or solo, so try to make it the best of the bunch.

But seriously, networing is everything. Even if you are talentless, you can make it in the music biz as long as you have the rigt people behind you. *COUGH Pete Wentz COUGH*
-Instruments-
Squier frankenbass
LTD Deluxe EC-1000 in Vintage Black
1960's Banjuke
#5
Like everyone else said, learn a lot of theory. Most bands will ask for a specific sound or say to you 'make it sound like this song, but not this song' y'know? Play along to a lot of music and try to play each song in a different genre bass line to see how it fits.
DB Player
#6
Learn a lot of theory, sight reading in particular.

Also, learn new genres, including pop, rnb, soul etc. As if you do make it, it's most likely thats what you'll be playing.
Quote by guitarhero_764
I think you need to stop caring what people think about it. I stayed home all day today and masturbated like 5 times. Fucking blast.

Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#7
Sight reading can take up to a couple years to learn fluently. Its a lot of work, but learn the theory of pop, rnb and soul like Scott said.
DB Player
#8
Finding work as a session musician depends A LOT on reputation. Learn your theory/sight reading, practice a good work ethic, and meet a lot of people.
Call Me Joe
Quote by wesleyisgay
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FUK



Communist Mormon of 2.21.19.8

Caffeine Head of The Bass Militia
#10
Youll need proficiency in a variety of techniques, that way in the studio, if the songwriter decides that the song might move better with a funky slap n pop riff, you wont look like a tool trying to teach yourself how to slap and pop on the spot Being proficient with a plectrum would also be helpful, since in session music its definitly far from uncommon to be asked to play your bass track with a pick. Youll being playing second fiddle to whoever is writing the music really, but that doesnt mean you wont have your own time to shine. Alot of really great bassists were/are session musicians rather than full band members. John Paul Jones was a session musician for some time before Led Zeppelin formed, and Duck Dunn is a superb bassist, and (i think, im no expert) hes been primarily just a sesh musician most of his career.

Oh, and ill stress flexibility again - know your musical genres/play styles. Jazz and blues and variations/sub genres of those two are the most important i think, as they can be applied to almost any genre as a bass player. And as Kranos mentioned, knowing how to make a hook is important. Listen to some older pop music (think what you will of Micheal Jackson, the bassline for Billie Jean is pure sex ) and hip hop. Even modern hip hop, the generic sh!t on the radio, has some catchie bass (real or synthesized/studio produced).
#11
You really have to know how to do everything expertly, thats all there is to it really

Somethings to do to start the road would be:

Learn how to read music (very well too, almost no mistakes on the read)
Learn theory (not just major/minor scales, things like counterpoint, modal playing, everything)
Become a master at dialing in any tone for any genre (ANY genre)
Get professional looking equipment (forget the case with 147 stickers about your political views)
Learn to play in any genre
#12
Play stuff you absolutely hate and dissect it from every which way theory-wise.
You might even start to like that stuff, once you know all the ins and outs of it.
GHOST BLOWJOB!
WHOOO! WOOOOOOOOOOOO!
#13
"If you wanna make it to the top, prepare to kiss a lot of bottom."


You gotta know people... Best way to know people? Suck lots of c0ck.....


Figuratively of course.
Schecter Stiletto Studio 5
Ibanez SRX2EX1
Gallien Krueger 1001rbii
Gallien Krueger Neo 410
#14
Dont ever turn down a chance to learn something no matter how minuscule and pointless it may seem give it ur all and try to do it the best u can cause those stupid little things make a world of difference. And be open to as much different equipment as possible. active pickups passive pickups 20 frets 24 frets 4 to 12 string and all amps solid state tube modulated different speaker combination's and sizes and pedals galore. it helps to have the equipment for a thousand different sounds
Keep On Keepen' On