#1
hello, my yougner brother, 8 years old, wants to learn to play guitar and i figured i should try teach him. I've never taught anyone from scratch and cant really remember begining myself.
so i have a few questions:
full size electric or 3/4 size acoustic for an 8 year old to begin with?
steel or nylon strings?
he doesnt listen to music so i dont know any songs to teach him, nursery rhymes to start with?
pick or fingers?
how can i tell if he is too tense?
how do i convice him to use a metronome, or is it unnecessary to start with?
his goal is to be able to busk with me and make some money, is this enough motivation or should i try motivate him some other way?

and most of all...how do I teach him?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
I tought my brother with an 3/4 acoustic, I started off with the basic chords like G, C etc. (with and without pick( Then proceding to fingerpicking these chords.
The i tought him easy songs with these chords. A year later he got a cheap electric strat copy , then i tought him powerchords and green day. Now, a year later, he can play Metallica, some A7X etc.

for the actual teaching: just tell him which frets to put fingers on and the name of the chord and tell him to practice these every day, so he knows them by heart eventually
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Last edited by Skywalker007 at Jan 3, 2009,
#3
On the guitar, take him to a guitar shop and see what size is right for him.

Electric vs acoustic, steel vs nylon should be up to him at that age, otherwise he could give up.

What kind of TV/movies does he watch? Teach him the theme tune to his favourite cartoons etc.

Introduce him to music. Give him the most popular, easy listening of each genre; and see what he likes. Probably start off with the timeless classic rock riffs.

Pick vs fingers - give him some picks of various thickness, and just let him use what he wants, be it pick or finger.

Don't worry about tension. The important thing is to get him interested in the guitar and music - don't put him off by focusing on technique just yet.

Metronome - again, he'll only want to be having fun at this stage, so let him decide whether or not to use a metronome. Explain how it works and how to use it, but leave it up to him.

His goals are his goals. Encourage him, and get to busking together as soon as possible.
#4
Quote by Skywalker007
I tought my brother with an 3/4 acoustic, I started off with the basic chords like G, C etc. (with and without pick( Then proceding to fingerpicking these chords.
The i tought him easy songs with these chords. A year later he got a cheap electric strat copy , then i tought him powerchords and green day. Now, a year later, he can play Metallica, some A7X etc.

for the actual teaching: just tell him which frets to put fingers on and the name of the chord and tell him to practice these every day, so he knows them by heart eventually

Yep, he tought me that. ( i'm his brother)
You lost the game...... again...

Born on the same day as Buckethead.
Coincidence? I don't think so
#5
^ The minimum age on this forum is 13 years old, so if you want to delete that post, I'll delete this one.
#6
When I try to teach friends I try to begin them on steel to strengthen the fingers and break them in faster. Nylon is quite a bit softer which gives them an easier time, but I've always thought it best to work with steel to begin with.

I started by teaching basic chords, then showing them how to pick out strings in a chord and mix that around to create different sounds and progressions.

One thing you shouldn't do is teach them that playing fast is good. I know its probably going to be something he is interested in with current music, but don't go there. Show him through example that playing slow and smooth is just as good as playing fast ( let him listen to some lightening from Michael Angelo then throw him Dark Side of the Moon or some Stevie Ray Vaughan ).

Once he has picked up on it a bit, try teaching some basic scales like the blues, etc. Don't overwhelm him or he won't be able to take in as much to learn the scales. Also try to teach him to pick with a pick and finger picking, that is always important.

Edit - As said above, find a guitar shop and see whats best for him. 3/4 is usually a good place to start, expecially if he is small, due to the size of the frets on the neck. It's much easier to stretch around while his fingers get coordinated.
Last edited by WeaponsTheyFear at Jan 3, 2009,
#7
Quote by blue_strat
^ The minimum age on this forum is 13 years old, so if you want to delete that post, I'll delete this one.

What seems to be the problem? I am 13.
You lost the game...... again...

Born on the same day as Buckethead.
Coincidence? I don't think so
#8
Quote by WeaponsTheyFear
When I try to teach friends I try to begin them on steel to strengthen the fingers and break them in faster. Nylon is quite a bit softer which gives them an easier time, but I've always thought it best to work with steel to begin with.

I started by teaching basic chords, then showing them how to pick out strings in a chord and mix that around to create different sounds and progressions.

One thing you shouldn't do is teach them that playing fast is good. I know its probably going to be something he is interested in with current music, but don't go there. Show him through example that playing slow and smooth is just as good as playing fast ( let him listen to some lightening from Michael Angelo then throw him Dark Side of the Moon or some Stevie Ray Vaughan ).

Once he has picked up on it a bit, try teaching some basic scales like the blues, etc. Don't overwhelm him or he won't be able to take in as much to learn the scales. Also try to teach him to pick with a pick and finger picking, that is always important.

Edit - As said above, find a guitar shop and see whats best for him. 3/4 is usually a good place to start, expecially if he is small, due to the size of the frets on the neck. It's much easier to stretch around while his fingers get coordinated.

I agree with the qoute