#1
With some pedals, it says for the power "DC9v80mA" (the 80 being an example).

Does this mean the pedal won't work with less than 80mA?

Also, I have some pedals with an unspecified value of mA - would it be safe to use the AC adapter from my old computer speakers which runs at 1000mA?
#3
nope, you`ll fry the internals, but if you find an old printer, take the power supply off that, im using it for my metal muff
~Defiant~
#4
dont ever mix A/c Adapters, you'll fry sh¡t, if you REALLY have no clue, take it into your local music store
#5
If it draws 80mA, you need to have a power supply that will produce at least that much current. Using one with less current will cause erratic operation with the pedal and likely cause the adapter to overheat and fail.

The adapter MUST be able to provide not only the proper current, but the polarity and voltage must be right, too. If the polarity is reversed, you risk damaging the pedal. If the voltage is too high, you risk damaging it. If it's too low, it won't work right.
#6
Quote by KG6_Steven
If it draws 80mA, you need to have a power supply that will produce at least that much current. Using one with less current will cause erratic operation with the pedal and likely cause the adapter to overheat and fail.

The adapter MUST be able to provide not only the proper current, but the polarity and voltage must be right, too. If the polarity is reversed, you risk damaging the pedal. If the voltage is too high, you risk damaging it. If it's too low, it won't work right.


The voltage is correct, the polarity is correct, just that the adapter is 1000mA and the pedal has an unspecified value of mA.
#7
Quote by michal23
The voltage is correct, the polarity is correct, just that the adapter is 1000mA and the pedal has an unspecified value of mA.


What is the pedal?
#8
Quote by michal23
The voltage is correct, the polarity is correct, just that the adapter is 1000mA and the pedal has an unspecified value of mA.
Well the pedal draws as much amperage as it needs. The voltage remains a constant, as does polarity, so it's fine. As long as the supply is regulated (it probably is) then you'll be fine. You could run millions of pedals off of it.
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#9
Quote by a_man
What is the pedal?


Yamaha CH10-m2

and thanks guys, I'll try it out!

EDIT:

Just to double check with the polarity. The "-" and "+" signs match on the adapter and the pedal. But the little semi circle that surrounds one half of the dot in the middle differs. I didn't notice this before, I presume it matters?
#10
well pedals are usually center pin negative. this means that the dot in the middle should be labeled with the "-" sign on both, and the semi-circle around it should be labeled with the "+" sign. im not sure what you mean about the semii-circle being different though.
ie, they should both look like the second one: pic

or of course if they both look like the first one, then thats cool too. they just both need to have the same polarity.
#11
^ Yeah, I figured. I was just confused, because the pedal has negative polarity, but the diagram is a bit like the second one but mirrored. See, the "-" and the "+" are as with the positive arrangement, but the semicircle in the middle suggests it is negative.

Anyway, I ain't gonna risk frying the pedal

Thanks for your help guys.